Tag Archives: hook

30 Memorable Last Lines


“30 Memorable Last Lines” by Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright 2018 Joan Y. Edwards
As writers you’ve heard many times, “Have a good hook. Have an opening that hooks the reader into staying for the whole show. In other words, have an opener that gets readers to keep reading your book until the very end.

 

Today I’d like to focus on the last words of your book, the message you want to resonate in the hearts of your readers for a really long time. The one you want them to keep hearing over and over. I’ve put the spotlight on the last lines of books and a few movies. Film makers choose many books to make into movies.

 

You want your readers to define the closing a good one…a satisfactory conclusion. And even more than that, you want the last words of your book to resonate in the ears and hearts of your readers for their lifetime. You want them to be memorable. They will be memorable if they are meaningful to your readers.

 

I found many links online to what others believe are the most memorable last lines of books and movies. I shared them in the resources section below.

 

It seems difficult to fathom anyone being able to read every book or to see all movies. However, if you’re like me, you love to read and you love to watch good movies. You read the books or watch the movies that meet a need of yours. You have your opinions about the books you’ve read or movies you’ve seen. 

 

I believe that like the beginning of books, the closing of books can also hook readers. I listed stories I’ve read or would like to read because of the impact, the closing had on me.  Some are serious and others are humorous, but all are meaningful to me. These closing lines hooked me. 

 

Please share your favorite last lines of books or movies with me.

 

30 Memorable Last Lines

  1. “The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.” –George Orwell, Animal Farm (1945)
  2. “It was a fine cry—loud and long—but it had no bottom and it had no top, just circles and circles of sorrow.” –Toni Morrison, Sula (1973)
  3. “But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she’s going to adopt me and civilize me and I can’t stand it. I been there before.”  –Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885)
  4. “Maybe I will go to Paris. Who knows? But I’ll sure as hell never go back to Texas again.” –James Crumley, The Final Country (2001)
  5. “Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman; and how she would keep, through all her riper years, the simple and loving heart of her childhood; and how she would gather about her other little children, and make their eyes bright and eager with many a strange tale, perhaps even with the dream of Wonderland of long ago; and how she would feel with all their simple sorrows, and find a pleasure in all their simple joys, remembering her own child-life, and the happy summer days. –Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865)
  6. “P.S. Sorry I forgot to give you the mayonnaise.”
    –Richard Brautigan, Trout Fishing in America (1967)
  7. “Columbus too thought he was a flop, probably, when they sent him back in chains. Which didn’t prove there was no America.” –Saul Bellow, The Adventures of Augie March (1953)
  8. “We shall never be again as we were!” –Henry James, The Wings of the Dove (1902)
  9. “Tell me how free I am.” –Richard Powers, Prisoner’s Dilemma (1988)
  10. “But wherever they go, and whatever happens to them on the way, in that enchanted place on the top of the Forest, a little boy and his Bear will always be playing.” – A. A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner (1928)
  11. “Don’t ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody.” – J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye (1951)
  12. I taker her hand, squeezing it tightly, and we walk on. -Monika Schröder  My Brothers Shadow (2011)
  13. “But I knew that Catherine had kissed me because she trusted me, and that made me happy then but now I am sad because by the time my eyes close each night I suspect that as usual I have been fooling myself, that she, too, is in her grave.” –William T. Vollmann, You Bright and Risen Angels (1987)
  14. “Vaya con Dios, my darklin’, and remember: vote early and vote often, don’t take any wooden nickels, and”—by now I was rolling about helplessly on the spare room floor, scrunched up around my throbbing pain and bawling like a baby— “always leave ’em laughin’ as you say good-bye!” –Robert Coover, The Public Burning (1977)
  15. “I never saw any of them again—except the cops. No way has yet been invented to say goodbye to them. –Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye (1953)
  16. “He heard the ring of steel against steel as a far door clanged shut. –Richard Wright, Native Son (1940)
  17. “I ran with the wind blowing in my face, and a smile as wide as the valley of Panjsher on my lips. I ran.” – Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner (2003)
  18. Jerry: “But don’t you understand, Osgood? Oh… I’m a man!”
    Osgood Fielding: “Well, nobody’s perfect.” – Some Like It Hot Film adapted by director Billy Wilder and comedy writer, I.A.L. Diamond from Fanfare of Love, a story by Michael Logan.
  19. “I’m so glad to be at home again” – L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900)
  20. Jim: “Where you headed, cowboy?”
    Bart: “Nowhere special.”
    Jim: “Nowhere special? I always wanted to go there.”
    Bart: “Come on.” -Mel Brooks, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor, Norman Steinberg, and Al Uger, and was based on Andrew Bergman’s story and draft, Blazing Saddles.
  21. “But the miracle of it all is, when push comes to shove, we can be just as tough as hickory. It mostly burns at first. After a while it starts to feel better.” -Joyce Moyer Hostetter,  Blue
  22. E.T.: “I’ll be right here.” – Steven Spielberg, E.T. the Extraterrestrial
  23. Louis: “Looking good, Billy Ray!”
    Billy Ray: “Feeling good, Louis!” – 
    Timothy HarrisHerschel Weingrod,  Trading Places
  24. “But the sky was bright, and he somehow felt he was headed in the right direction.” – E.B. White, Stuart Little (1934)
  25. “Tomorrow, I’ll think of some way to get him back. After all, tomorrow is another day.” – Margaret Mitchell, Gone With The Wind (1936)
  26. “And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us, Every One!” – Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol (1843)
  27. “A LAST NOTE FROM YOUR NARRATOR. I am haunted by humans.”- Markus Zusak, The Book Thief (2006)
  28. “The scar had not pained Harry for nineteen years. All was well.” –  J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. 
  29. “But that is the beginning of a new story—the story of the gradual renewal of a man, the story of his gradual regeneration, of his passing from one world into another, of his initiation into a new unknown life. That might be the subject of a new story, but our present story is ended.” –Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment (1866; trans. Constance Garnett)
  30. “From here on in I rag nobody.” –Mark Harris, Bang the Drum Slowly (1956)

 

Advertisements

You Have the Luck of the Irish – Submit a Manuscript Today (PubSub3rdFri)


Dear Pub Subbers,
It’s the luck of the Irish. Submit a manuscript on the third Friday of March or any month. If you’re not Irish, it’s still a lucky fun-filled day for you. Get that creative work ready and send it off the next third Friday that rolls around. Submit regularly and often to raise your chances of being published.

I’d like to share a little personal history of my submissions. In 2009, before I started PubSub3rdFri, I submitted four times. All four had negative responses of “NO.”
In 2010 after I started PubSub3rd Fri, I submitted 30 times.
As a result of pitching to an agent and 2 editors at online/in-person interviews, I got three “YES, I want to see your manuscript” responses, followed by two “NO, Your manuscript does not meet our needs.” However, one publishing company editor responded in 2011 that they are tentatively interested in publishing “Joan’s Elder Care Guide.” That is one “MAYBE.” This is farther than I’d gotten previously.
As a result of a query to Working Writer Newsletter for an article about PubSub3rdFri, I received a “YES.”
Out of the 30 submissions, 4 answers were “YES.” Four out of 30 equals 13% Yes. That is really an improvement.
87% said, “NO.” However, I’m going to focus on the 13% Yes.

Do I have a book accepted by a publishing company yet? No. Does submitting more often improve your chances of getting a “YES?” I think so. Has my writing and my understanding of the getting published process improved? Yes. Am I getting closer? Yes, I believe I am. My belief is half the battle.

I truly want each of us to get published. In inspiring you, I find encouragement for myself.

I’m making a list of people who submitted work because of PubSub3rdFri during 2010. If you submitted and want to be listed on the  Pub Subbers 2010 list, please email me at the address listed in the left-hand column with your name and blog/website. Tell me at least one title, place you submitted to, date submitted, and whether it was by email or snail mail. Tell me your name and blog/website.  If you don’t have a blog/website, I’ll just list your name. I’ll choose a Pub Subber 2010 member at random to win a free critique  on April 1, 2011 at noon EST.

For all of you who participate in PubSub3rdFri during 2011, I’d like to list your name and a link to your website/blog on a Pub Subbers 2011 page on this blog. If you don’t have a blog or website, I’ll list your name by itself.

To be eligible to win a free critique during March
1. Submit a manuscript for a picture book, chapter book, middle grade, young adult novel, adult novel, play, movie, song, puzzle, article, illustration, query, proposal to a publisher, editor, agent, or contest.
2. Make a comment below with the following information:
Title of Project
Name of Contest, Publisher, Editor, Agent
Date you submitted
Email or Snail Mail
Your Name
Link to Your Personal Website or Blog
3. Your name will be put in a drawing to receive a FREE CRITIQUE by me. The winner will be announced on April 1, 2011 at 12:00 noon EST.
4. Your name and your personal blog/website will be listed on a Pub Subbers 2011 page on my blog. If you don’t have a blog or website, I’ll list your name by itself.

I hope you’ll join us in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year. Of course, you can submit your work to more than one publisher or agent a month.

Honor your dreams by submitting a manuscript this month. It’ll get you started. If you do it at least three months in a row, I believe you’ll be creating a life-long habit. It’ll start your ball rolling to knock down all the publication pins in your alley.

Believe in yourself. Your belief will spread to others who will believe in you, too. All of your experiences will lead you to be a stronger person, wiser, skilled, and energetic. Your belief is half your battle. I know for sure that publishers do not come searching the drawers or computers where your manuscripts or other creative works are hidden in your home. You have to let them know about your creative treasures. Take action. Submit to publishers and/or agents. Celebrate each step on your path to publication!

Here are steps for each week to get you ready to submit your work to a publisher or agent: say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

Get your manuscript, and use the resources below to accomplish your Pub Sub 3rd Fri goal:

Steps for Week One Smile, Giggle, Laugh . See the humor.
1. Read this book or a similar one, or search online publisher/agent websites for current guidelines.

Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman

http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

2. Choose three publishers/agents to submit a manuscript/query letter/illustration.

a. Read the guidelines of all three publishers/agents.

b. Select the publisher/agent to use this month.

c. Print out a copy of the publisher’s guidelines and save it in your submissions folder.

3. Fine tune your manuscript.

a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

d. Here are fourteen books that may help you with your writing skills. They are listed in alphabetical order according to author’s first name. If you click on the title, it’ll take you to Amazon.com. Check out the book from your local library for free or buy it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for beginning and improving your story. Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

1. Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis
2. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction
3. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel
4. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook
5. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel
6. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II
7. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Mystery
8. James N. Frey The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth
9. Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact
10. Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories
11. Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages
12. Jordan E. Rosenfeld: Make a Scene
13. Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch
14. Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri Smile, Giggle, Laugh .

1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter, then write your query letter.

3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor. Refer to my blog for more information about writing your pitch: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/how-to-entice-an-editoragent-with-a-pitch-logline.

b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On (date 3 months from your submission) I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

4. Write your resume.

a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

c. Include all of your publishing credits.

5. If needed, write your proposal.

Steps for Week Three Smile, Giggle, Laugh:

1. Read out loud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

3. If you see errors, correct them.

4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

11. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

Pub Sub 3rd Friday Laugh, Smile, Laugh
12. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

13. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

Dance! Sing! Celebrate Your Submission!

Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on the third Friday of this month, go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog posts for more information: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri.

To those of you who are reading this. Thank you. I am honored. Good luck in publishing your work. For more encouragement to submit your work, read Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works. Let me know if Pub Sub 3rd Fri helps you get published. I’d love to hear from you. Feel free to share a link to my blog with others.

1. Sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block at the top of the left hand column. 2. If you want to be listed on the Pub Subbers 2012 list, email me at the address listed in the left-hand column with your name and blog/website. If you don’t have a blog/website, I’ll just list your name.

Never Give Up!
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2011 Joan Y. Edwards and her licensors.

Help Celebrate PubSub3rdFri’s First Birthday – Submit on Friday, February 18, 2011


PubSub3rdFri Participant

Dear Pub Subbers,

Happy Birthday, PubSub3rdFri! Happy Birthday to you! Happy Birthday to you. Happy Birthday, Pub Sub, Happy Birthday to you.
The first official Pub Sub day was February 15, 2010. We’re going to have a great celebration on Friday, February 18, 2011.  As a Valentine’s Day present to yourself, I would like for you to join me in submitting a query, manuscript, or proposal on that day (or any day during February).  You can count it as a submission if you enter a writing contest or an illustrator contest. If you submit your work during February, read the directions at the end of this blog post to have a chance to receive a FREE CRITIQUE by me.

I hope you’ll join us in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year. Of course, you can submit your work to more than one publisher a month. Yes, indeed, you can submit to more than one agent a month. Honoring your dreams by submitting a manuscript this month is only to get you started. I hope that once you get started, you’ll be submitting as a habit. I hope that your belief in yourself will grow and branch out to all aspects of your life and will indeed help you reach your goal of getting published. I know for sure that publishers do not come searching the drawers where your manuscripts are hidden in your home. You have to let them know about your writing treasures. Take action. Submit to publishers and/or agents.

It is very important in life to take time to do what is important to you.  By honoring yourself by working on your writing, you are being a good example to your family that each person should take time to do what is vitally important to them.  Be creative. You can do it. You can find 15 minutes for you each day.  There are different parts to writing:  1. Experience life and watch people. 2. Read. 3. Write down ideas that intrigue you. 4. Write about the ideas that won’t let you go…the what ifs. Drop the excuses. It’s just as easy to say the words, “I have the time,” as it is to say, “I don’t have the time.” One empowers you and the other stops you in your tracks. So you don’t do it every month, but you do it more than you ever have in the past. Hurray for you! Celebrate! Even if it’s with a cup of coffee. Celebrate your submissions. Celebrate you…there’s only one of you.

Here are steps for each week to get you ready to submit your work to a publisher or agent: say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

Besides a manuscript or article, below are the resources you need to accomplish your Pub Sub 3rd Fri goal:

Steps for Week One Smile, Giggle, Laugh . See the humor.
1. Read this book or a similar one, or search online publisher/agent websites for current guidelines.

Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman

http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

2 Choose three publishers/agents to submit a manuscript/query letter/illustration.

a. Read the guidelines of all three publishers/agents.

b. Select the publisher/agent to use this month.

c. Print out a copy of the publisher’s guidelines and save it in your submissions folder.

3. Fine tune your manuscript.

a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

d. Here are fourteen books that may help you with your writing skills. They are listed in alphabetical order according to author’s first name. If you click on the title, it’ll take you to Amazon.com. Check out the book from your local library for free or buy it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for beginning and improving your story. Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

1. Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis

2. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction

3. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel

4. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook

5. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel

6. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II

7. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Mystery

8. James N. Frey The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth

9. Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact

10. Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories

11. Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages

12. Jordan E. Rosenfeld: Make a Scene

13. Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch

14. Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri Smile, Giggle, Laugh .

1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter, then write your query letter.

3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor. Refer to my blog for more information about writing your pitch: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/how-to-entice-an-editoragent-with-a-pitch-logline.

b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On (date 3 months from your submission) I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

4. Write your resume.

a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

c. Include all of your publishing credits.

5. If needed, write your proposal.

Steps for Week Three Smile, Giggle, Laugh:

1. Read out loud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

3. If you see errors, correct them.

4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

11. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

Pub Sub 3rd Friday Laugh, Smile, Laugh
12. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

13. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on the third Friday of this month, go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog posts for more information: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri.

To those of you who are reading this. Thank you. I am honored. Good luck in publishing your work.  For more encouragement to submit your work, read Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works. Let me know if Pub Sub 3rd Fri helps you get published. I’d love to hear from you. Feel free to share a link to my blog with others.

Never Give Up!
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2011 Joan Y. Edwards.

 

Twelve Gifts for You in 2011: Submit Once Each Month (PubSub3rdFri)


Participant Badge of Pub Sub 3rd Fri

Dear Pub Subbers,

Happy New Year! It’s time to give yourself twelve gifts for 2011. You thought gifts were for Christmas. Gifts are for all year long. This is a gift of believing in yourself. Show that you believe in your writing by submitting your work to a publisher or agent at least once a month during 2011. I hope you’ll join us in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year.  Of course, you can submit your work to more than one publisher a month. Yes, indeed, you can submit to more than one agent a month. This promise of a gift to yourself is only to get you started. I hope that once you get started, you’ll be submitting as a habit. I hope that your belief in yourself will grow and branch out to all aspects of your life and will indeed help you reach your goal of getting published. I know for sure that publishers do not come searching the drawers where your manuscripts are hidden in your home. You have to let them know about your writing treasures. Take action. Submit to publishers and/or agents.

Even though you are helping others, even though you are taking care of your young family of three, even though your responsibilities are great. You deserve and must have time to fill yourself with the fuel to do something for you.  Fifteen minutes a day time for you. If your daughter or son wanted to do this, would you help them find the time to write and submit? Drop the excuses. It’s just as easy to say the words, “I have the time,” as it is to say, “I don’t have the time.” One empowers you and the other stops you in your tracks. So you don’t do it every month, but you do it more than you ever have in the past. Hurray for you! Celebrate! Even if it’s with a cup of coffee. Celebrate your submissions. Celebrate you…there’s only one of you.

Here are steps for each week to get you ready to submit your work to a publisher or agent: say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

Besides a manuscript or article, below are the resources you need to accomplish your Pub Sub 3rd Fri goal:

Steps for Week One Smile, Giggle, Laugh .
1. Read this book or a similar one, or search online publisher/agent websites for current guidelines.

Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman

http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

2 Choose three publishers/agents to submit a manuscript/query letter/illustration.

a. Read the guidelines of all three publishers/agents.

b. Select the publisher/agent to use this month.

c. Print out a copy of the publisher’s guidelines and save it in your submissions folder.

2. Fine tune your manuscript.

a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

d. Here are thirteen books that may help you with your writing skills. They are listed in alphabetical order according to author’s first name. If you click on the title, it’ll take you to Amazon.com. Check out the book from your local library for free or buy it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for improving your story.  Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

1. Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis

2. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction

3. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel

4. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook

5. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel

6. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II

7. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Mystery

8. Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact

9. Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories

10. Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages

11. Jordan E. Rosenfeld: Make a Scene

12. Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch

13. Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri Smile, Giggle, Laugh.

1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter, then write your query letter.

3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor. Refer to my blog for more information about writing your pitch: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/how-to-entice-an-editoragent-with-a-pitch-logline.

b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On (date 3 months from your submission) I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

4. Write your resume.

a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

c. Include all of your publishing credits.

5. If needed, write your proposal.

Steps for Week Three Smile, Giggle, Laugh:

1. Read out loud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

3. If you see errors, correct them.

4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

11. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

Pub Sub 3rd Friday Laugh, Smile, Laugh
13. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

14. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on the third Friday of this month, go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more information: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri.

Thank you for reading my blog. Good luck in publishing your work. Let me know if Pub Sub 3rd Fri helps you get published. Please sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column.

The 50th person to subscribe by email from the left will receive a free paperback copy of Flip Flap Floodle or a 1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer.

January 11-18th There are three ways to have a chance to win a free copy of “Jeff Herman’s Guide to Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents:”

1. Visit my blog and leave a comment on my blog review of his book.

2. Visit my blog and leave a comment on my blog interview with Jeff Herman

3. Visit my blog and sign up for an email subscription to my blog.

Smile, Giggle, Laugh

Happy New Year!

Joan Y. Edwards

Only $10.00 Flip Flap Floodle, Delightful Duck Who Never Gives Up on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Flip-Flap-Floodle-Joan-Edwards/dp/1594572852/

Pub Sub 3rd Fri webpage http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm

Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog pages https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri/

Joy Acey Says Pub Sub Works


Participant Badge of Pub Sub 3rd Fri

“Joy Acey Says Pub Sub Works” by Joan Y. Edwards

It’s time to fill Your Writer’s Bag of Success with Submissions on the next third Friday to come around. You may say, “I’m too busy. Honor yourself. Take the time to submit at least one submission before the next month ends. Let this be your gift to yourself.

I am happy to announce that on November 23, 2010, Joy Acey wrote the following:

“Hey Joan,

It worked!  I offered to read a poem for the local community radio station and they asked me to come in and record it.  I went last night and had a ball.  I was wowed watching the announcer digitally edit out my submitted beginning on one word.  I learned so much from this experience.  I even got to record my counting Christmas poem.  And as I was leaving they gave me a copy of one of the poems on CD with the announce and closing on it. Thank you for 3rd Friday.  It certainly helped me. JOY.”

Joy Acey’s Christmas poem was aired on the radio station KXCI  91.3 on Dec. 24th, 26th, 28th, and 29th, 2010. It was a great experience for Joy and all the listeners. You can leave her a comment below.

I hope you’ll join Pub Subbers. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year.

If you haven’t submitted lately, spend the next three weeks getting your creative work ready to send off. Start today to say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

Besides a manuscript or article, below are the resources you need to accomplish your Pub Sub goal:

Steps for Week One
1. Read this book or a similar one, or search online publisher/agent websites for current guidelines.

Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

2  Choose three publishers/agents to submit a manuscript/query letter/illustration.

a. Read the guidelines of all three publishers/agents.

b. Select the publisher/agent to use this month.

c. Print out a copy of the publisher’s guidelines and save it in your submissions folder.

  1. Fine tune your manuscript

a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

d. Here are ten books that may help you with your writing skills. If you click on the title, it’ll take you to Amazon.com. Check out the book from your local library for free or purchase it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for improving your story. Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

  1. Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers
  2. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction
  3. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel
  4. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook
  5. Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact
  6. Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories
  7. Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages
  8. Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis
  9. Jordan E. Rosenfeld: Make a Scene
  10. Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch

Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri

  1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.
  2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter, then write your query letter.

  3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor.  Refer to my blog for more information about writing your pitch:  https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/how-to-entice-an-editoragent-with-a-pitch-logline.

b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On (date 3 months from your submission) I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

4. Write your resume.

  • a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.
  • b. List all memberships in professional organizations.
  • c. Include all of your publishing credits.
  1. If needed, write your proposal.

Steps for Week Three:
1. Read out loud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

  1. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.
  • If you see errors, correct them.

  • Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

  • Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

  • Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

  • Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

  • Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

  • Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

  • Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

  • Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

  • Pub Sub Day
    13. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

    1. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

    Thank you for reading my blog.  Good luck in publishing your work. Let me know if Pub Sub 3rd Fri helps you get published. Please sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column. .

    Never Give Up
    Joan Y. Edwards

    Flip Flap Floodle at Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Flip-Flap-Floodle-Joan-Edwards/dp/1594572852/

    Joan’s Elder Care Guide: Empowering You and Your Elder to Survive

    4RV Publishing

    Amazon

    Barnes and Noble

    Stuff Your Turkey with Submissions in November (Pub Sub 3rd Fri)


    Dear Pub Subbers,
    It’s time to stuff your Submissions Turkey in November.

    In 2009 I noticed that I had many manuscripts ready to send off, but I wasn’t sending them often. Perhaps one every six months. Excuses were fear, insecurity, bashfulness, and clueless about where to send them. I didn’t like receiving all those no’s. And even more, I didn’t like the passive no’s, the no response.

    I remembered that at a workshop Pam Zollman said the more submissions you have out there, the better chance you’ll have of getting your work published. That made sense to me. I set my goal to submit work once a month. To make it fun for me, I invited others to join me: my Wordmunchers’ online writing group, my friend, Linda Andersen, and the email list members of SCBWI-Carolinas and the Muse Conference Board (participants of the Muse Online Writer’s Conference hosted by Lea Schizas).

    I hope you’ll join us in Pub Subbers. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year.

    If you haven’t submitted lately, spend the next three weeks getting your creative work ready to send off. Start today to say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

    Besides a manuscript or article, below are the resources you need to accomplish your Pub Subbers goal:

    Steps for Week One
    1. Read this book or a similar one, or search online publisher/agent websites for current guidelines.

    Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman

    http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

    2  Choose three publishers/agents to submit a manuscript/query letter/illustration.

    a. Read the guidelines of all three publishers/agents.

    b. Select the publisher/agent to use this month.

    c. Print out a copy of the publisher’s guidelines and save it in your submissions folder.

    1. Fine tune your manuscript

    a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

    b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

    c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

    d. Here are ten books that may help you with your writing skills. If you click on the title, it’ll take you to Amazon.com. Check out the book from your local library for free or purchase it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for improving your story. Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

    Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

    Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction

    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel

    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook

    Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact

    Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories

    Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages

    Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis

    Jordan E. Rosenfeld: Make a Scene

    Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch

    Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri

    1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.
    2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter, then write your query letter.

    3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

    a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor.  Refer to my blog for more information about writing your pitch:  https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/how-to-entice-an-editoragent-with-a-pitch-logline/

    b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

    c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

    d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On (date 3 months from your submission) I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

    1. Write your resume.

    a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

    b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

    c. Include all of your publishing credits.

    1. If needed, write your proposal.

    Steps for Week Three: The next Pub Sub day is November 19, 2010.

    1. Read aloud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.
  • Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

  • If you see errors, correct them.

  • Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

  • Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

  • Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

  • Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

  • Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

  • Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

  • Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

  • Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

  • Pub Sub 3rd Friday
    13. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

    1. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

    Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on Friday, November 17, 2010, go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm

    See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more information. https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri/
    Thank you for reading my blog.  Good luck in publishing your work. Let me know if Pub Sub 3rd Fri helps you get published.

    Please sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column. The 50th person to subscribe from the left will receive a free paperback copy of Flip Flap Floodle or a 1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer.Writer/Illustrator Flip Flap Floodle http://www.joanyedwards.com/FlipFlapFloodle.htm

    Joan Y. Edwards

    Flip at Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Flip-Flap-Floodle-Joan-Edwards/dp/1594572852/

    Pub Sub 3rd Fri webpage http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm

    Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog pages https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri/

    Start Your Submissions (PubSub3rdFri)


    Pub Sub 3rd Fri – Start Your Submssions

    Participant Badge of Pub Sub 3rd Fri

    Dear Pub Subbers,
    You’ve heard the saying, “Start your engines.” I changed it to “Start Your Submissions.”

    Thanks for joining me in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year. We started in February 2010. I’m glad I can count you in. It’s good to see you here.

    Each time you submit a manuscript or query, say, “Hurray for me. I’m getting closer to publication.”

    If you haven’t submitted lately, spend the next three weeks getting your creative work ready to send off. Start today to say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

    Steps for Week One
    1. Choose three possible publishers for the kind of writing you are submitting:

    a. Read all three publishers’ guidelines.

    b. Select the publisher to use this month.

    c. Print out a copy and save a copy of the publisher’s guidelines in your submissions folder.

    2. Fine tune your manuscript

    a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

    b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

    c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

    d. Here are eight books that may help you with your writing skills. Check out the book from your local library for free or purchase it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for improving your story. Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

    Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

    Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction

    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel

    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook

    Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact

    Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories

    Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages

    Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis

    Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri

    1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

    2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter , then write your query letter.

    3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

    a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor.

    b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

    c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

    d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On December 17, 2010 I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

    4. Write your resume.

    a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

    b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

    c. Include all of your publishing credits.

    5. If needed, write your proposal.

    Steps for Week Three: Pub Sub day is the third Friday of the month.

    1. Read aloud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

    2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

    3. If you see errors, correct them.

    4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

    5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

    6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

    7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

    8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

    9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

    10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

    11. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

    Pub Sub 3rd Friday
    13. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

    14. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

    Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on on the next third Friday, go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm

    See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more information. https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri/

    Thank you for reading my blog. Please sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column.

    Saturday, October 9, 2010 was my Never Give Up blog’s FIRST BIRTHDAY.  Because of the generosity of Rebecca Lukowski, from marketing at Maupin House and as a way to celebrate, I chose one subscriber to receive a copy of Carol Baldwin’s book:

    Teaching the Story: Fiction Writing in Grades 4-8; http://www.maupinhouse.com/index.php/teaching-the-story-fiction-writing-in-grades-4-8.html. It explains all aspects of the writing process. More than seventy transparency masters and reproducibles are included on the Resource CD which accompanies the book. Thank you, Carol and Rebecca. What a treasure!

    Another thank you to Carol Baldwin and Maupin House because they allowed me to add the following links for readers of my blog to download, save, and/or print four of the graphic organizers from her book.

    Exercise Muscle Words(PDF) http://kvisit.com/S-8pu

    Create Your Character (Word Doc) http://kvisit.com/SxYZ-

    Create Imaginary Characters (fantasy or science fiction) (Word Doc) http://kvisit.com/ShfCJAQ

    Build a Plot (PDF) http://kvisit.com/SxIZ-

    I chose the winners for the contest using www.random.org. I appreciate Darcy Pattison for telling about random.org in her blog. So cool.

    Please leave a comment, question, or resource.

    Never Give Up
    Live Write Laugh
    Joan Y. Edwards
    http://www.joanyedwards.com/FlipFlapFloodle.htm
    Author/Illustrator
    Flip Flap Floodle on Amazon.com

    Copyright 2010 Joan Y. Edwards. All rights reserved.

    Five Good Things to Do after a Writing Conference


    Dear Honored Readers,

    What are five good things to do after a writing conference? Here are things I believe would be helpful to you as a serious professional writer. My goal is to keep you enjoying living and writing, too.

    1. Sleep if you are tired. Accept yourself as you are and where you are. Accept others as they are.  Focus on what you want. Be thankful for what you have and where you are.  Put the fun back into your writing.

    2. Read and organize your notes from each workshop.  Write at least three major things you learned from each workshop. You can write down more details if you want.

    3. Make a top ten list of things that you learned at the overall conference.

    4. After all this information soaks into your mind, body, and spirit, write/revise three goals for your writing to use what you learned. (Be patient with yourself.)

    a. Writing Skill/Genre

    1) Read 10 books in your chosen genre and 3 books on the craft of writing.

    2) Revise your favorite manuscript and submit it to an editor or agent.

    3) Learn a new technology.

    b. Marketing

    1) Submit manuscripts/sample illustrations to different agents and/or editors on a regular basis.  (See my Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog posts)

    2) Prepare a book presentation for schools/organization.

    3) Prepare a proposal to present a workshop for a writing conference.

    4) Prepare a pitch for a manuscript. Go from a page summary and then focus on the words to hook readers. Keep shortening your pitch: 200-100-50-25 words.  The ultimate goal would be to have a pitch that is 140 characters long  to fit in Twitter. If you have all these, then if you need one for your cover letter, you’ll have it. If you want a blurb to put on your book, you’ll have it.  If a teacher asks you about your book, you’ll have a pitch to get them to want to buy your book.

    5) Prepare a post card, business card, bookmark, signature for email to promote you and your writing.  Use your book titles and pitch blurbs.

    c. Networking

    1) Website, Blog, Critique Group

    2) Book Presentations for schools and organizations

    3) Facebook Author/Illustrator Page; Twitter; Linked-In, others

    5. Contact at least three of the people who gave you a business card.  If you remember your conversation with them, remind them of how you enjoyed talking about “their love of horses” or  “their sadness at being rejected.”  Thank them for sharing a resource. Congratulate them on their manuscript. Compliment them for being brave and reading their story at open mike.  Thank them for giving you a new way to look at a problem you were having.  Visit their websites or Facebook pages, they might refresh your memory and/or give you new information to mention to them.

    I hope these ideas help you.

    Please share your comments, questions, and/or resources below. I’d love to hear from you.

    Thank you for reading my blog. Please sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column. Nineteen sweet people have subscribed so far. The 50th person to subscribe from the left will receive a free paperback copy of Flip Flap Floodle or a 1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer.

    Joan Y. Edwards, Author/Illustrator
    http://www.joanyedwards.com/FlipFlapFloodle.htm
    Flip Flap Floodle on Amazon.com

    Copyright © 2010 Joan Y. Edwards. All rights reserved.

    Prepare Submission for Third Friday (PubSub3rdFri)


    Prepare Submission for Third Friday (PubSub3rdFri)

    Participant Badge of Pub Sub 3rd Fri

    Dear Pub Subbers,
    Thanks for joining me in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year. We started in February 2010. I’m glad I can count you in.

    Each time you submit a manuscript or query, say, “Hurray for me. I’m getting closer to publication.”

    If you haven’t submitted lately, spend the next three weeks getting your creative work ready to send off. Start today to say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I CAN DO IT.”

    Summary of Week One
    Summary: During Week One, you will send your creative work to your critique group or to a professional editing service for critique. You will choose the publisher for this month’s submission. You will print out this publisher’s guidelines and save them to your computer in your submissions folder. You say to yourself, “I can do it.” You’ve take action.

    Steps for Week One
    1. Choose three possible publishers for the kind of writing you are submitting:
    a. Read all three publishers’ guidelines.
    b. Select the publisher you will use this month.
    c. Print out a copy and save a copy of the publisher’s guidelines.

    2. Fine tune your manuscript
    a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.
    b. Here are eight books that may help you with your writing skills. Check out the book from your local library for free, a used book store, or purchase online.

    Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

    Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction

    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel

    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook

    Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact

    Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories

    Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages

    Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis

    Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri
    1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

    2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter , then write your query letter.

    3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

    a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor.

    b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

    c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

    d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On December 17, 2010 I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

    4. Write your resume.

    a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

    b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

    c. Include all of your publishing credits.

    5. If needed, write your proposal.

    Steps for Week Three for Pub Sub 3rd Fri: Pub Sub day is September 17, 2010

    1. Read aloud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

    2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

    3. If you see errors, correct them.

    4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

    5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

    6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

    7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

    8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

    9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

    10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

    11. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

    Pub Sub 3rd Friday
    13. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

    14. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

    Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on Friday, September 17, 2010 Go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm

    See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more information. https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri/

    Thank you for reading my blog. Please sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column. The 50th person to subscribe from the left will receive a free paperback copy of Flip Flap Floodle or a 1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer.

    Please leave a comment, question, or resource.

    Never Give Up
    Live
    Joan Y. Edwards
    http://www.joanyedwards.com/FlipFlapFloodle.htm
    Author/Illustrator
    Flip Flap Floodle on Amazon.com

    Copyright 2010 Joan Y. Edwards. All rights reserved.

    Pub Sub 3rd Fri – Count Down to Submission on Friday, August 20, 2010


    Participant Badge of Pub Sub 3rd Fri

    Pub Sub 3rd Fri – Count Down to Submission on Friday, August 20, 2010

    Dear Pub Subbers,
    Thanks for joining me in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year. We started in February. Wow! We’ve been doing it for six months now. I’m glad I can count you in.

    One lady wrote saying she had just about given up on her writing and that my blogs had changed her way of thinking. She has become very enthusiastic about her writing and is enjoying it more. She even printed out 25 pages of my blogs to help her. I am very happy that she found my blog helpful. The purpose in my blog is to encourage you and to share skills, websites, and knowledge that I believe will help you and me make a better submission that will attract the editor or agent’s attention. I want each one of us published. Since it worked really well last month sending all the tips for the month’s PUB SUB 3RD FRI in one blog, I’m doing that again. That way it’ll all be in one place for you.

    If you submitted one month or several months, congratulations to you! Do the Pub Sub Dance listed below or make up your own dance. Celebrate you! You’re one of a kind.
    Stand up.
    Turn yourself to the left and say, “Hurray for me.”
    Turn yourself to the right and say, “I’m getting better and better.”
    Turn all the way around in a circle with your hands up in the air and say, “Yippee. I submitted a manuscript. I’m getting closer to publication.”

    Like the little duck in Flip Flap Floodle say, “I won’t give up.” Get your creative work ready to send off. Go For It. Start today to say you can. Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I CAN DO IT. I CAN REALLY DO IT.”

    Dan Dierdorf (American football player born in 1949) said, “You go for it. All the stops are out. Caution is to the wind, and your’re battling with everything you have. That’s the real fun of the game.”

    Howard Thurman (American Theologian, Clergyman and Activist, 1900-1981) “Don’t ask wha the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”

    Without further ado, here are hints to get your submission ready to send off on Friday, August 20, 2010. Three weeks…21 days. Long enough to break a habit or make a new habit stick.
    Summary of Week One
    Summary: During Week One, you will send your creative work to your critique group or to a professional editing service for critique. You will chose the publisher for this month’s submission. You will print out this publisher’s guidelines and save them to your computer in your submissions folder. You say to yourself, “I can do it.” You’ve take action.

    Steps for Week One
    1. Choose three possible publishers for the kind of writing you are submitting:
    a. 2010 Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market (Children’s Writer’s and Illustrator’s Market) (Paperback)

    b.2010 Novel-Short StoryWritersMarket

    c. Free Fiction Factor Marketing information for writers of adult and children’s fiction. they have a section for Christian Fiction, too.

    d. Free online Sally Stuart’s Christian Book Publishers

    e. Free online Sally Stuart’s Christian Magazine Publishers

    f. Subscribe (Purchase) Online Writers Market

    (1)FAQs about Writer’s Market
    What is the cost of WritersMarket.com?
    A one year subscription to the complete Writer’s Market database costs $39.99 (renews automatically until you cancel) and a two year subscription costs $54.99. Monthly subscriptions are $5.99 per month (renews automatically until you cancel). WritersMarket.com now offers one year niche subscriptions to Children’s Poetry, and Novel & Short Story for $19.99 (renews automatically until you cancel).

    When you sign up for a one or two year subscription you will receive a 7 day risk free trial at the beginning of your subscription. If you cancel at anytime during your first 7 days you owe nothing. However, if you use a debit card to subscribe the funds may be held for 7 days. If you cancel during the risk free trial the funds will not be processed.

    2. This week make a list of three possible publishers for this particular creative work of yours.
    a. Read all three publishers’ guidelines.
    b. Select the publisher you will use this month.
    c. Print out a copy and save a copy of the publisher’s guidelines.

    3. Fine tune your manuscript
    a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.
    b. Read Self-Editing for Fiction Writers by Renni Browne and Dave King. Your local library may have a copy. I put a link the book on Amazon. It has come highly recommended to me from many sources. I’ve ordered it from the library.
    c. I recommend “Writing for Emotional Impact,” by Karl Iglesias http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1595940286/ref=oss_product, It really speaks to me. It explains the parts of a story clearly. It explains emotional story values. In addition to calling a part of the story the conflict, it explains that it should be a disturbance for the protagonist. It disturbs his life so much he can’t ignore it. It upsets him so much that he has to do something. Karl Iglesias uses movies like the Godfather, Ferris Beuller’s Day Off, Casablanca, and others to show you the beginning, middle, and end. He relates them to a three act play. However, you can use almost all of his explanations in the writing of scenes and whole novels. You can also use them for a short story. You can use them for a children’s picture book. Check for the book at your library.
    d. Here are six books that have helped me with my writing skills. Checking out the book from your local library is free.
    If you want your own copy, usually you can buy used ones on Amazon for $5.00 or less plus $3.99 shipping. You can also check a used book store in your area.

    Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction.</em>
    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel.
    Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook.
    Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages.
    Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories
    Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis

    e. Here are links to just about every kind of Graphic Organizer you can think of:
    (1)Thinkport Character, Plot, Sequence of Events Choose the PDF files so you can print them out.
    http://www.thinkport.org/technology/template.tp

    (2)http://www.teacherfiles.com/resources_organizers.htm Each one listed where you can see it with a separate link to PDF files.

    (3)http://freeology.com/graphicorgs/index.php PDF files Character, Plot, You have to search through each page to see what’s there.

    f. Perhaps you did more research for your article. You have photos and information from an interview to add to it.
    g. Maybe you rewrote the second chapter of your novel because it needed better dialogue.
    h. Ask your writing group to critique your work.
    or
    i. Ask a professional writer/editor to edit your work.
    or
    j. Critique it yourself.

    Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri
    1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

    2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter and not to send the manuscript, then write your query letter.
    a. You can go to Query Shark http://queryshark.blogspot.com/ and check out Charlotte Dillon’s website http://www.charlottedillon.com/query.html/. She has a query sample, names of books, and links to online articles about query letters. Awesome resource!
    b. Here’s another telling you how to write a pitch letter for that indepth article you’ve written: http://www.ehow.com/how_2117753_write-pitch-letter.html
    c. “Write a Query Letter That Is Pitch Perfect” by Suzanne Pitner
    http://writingfiction.suite101.com/article.cfm/write-a-query-letter-that-is-pitch-perfect
    d. Make the Perfect Pitch – The Novel Query by Kelly James-Enger
    http://www.right-writing.com/pitch.html

    3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it. Good sources for cover letter notes are:
    a.Moira Allen’s http://www.writing-world.com/basics/cover.shtml
    b. http://resourcesforwriters.suite101.com/article.cfm/how_to_write_a_cover_letter/.
    c. What to do/what not to do in query and cover letters from “Rites of Submission: Cover Letters and Query Letters” by Jacqueline K. Ogburn: http://www.underdown.org/covlettr.htm

    a. Write a pitch for your manuscript, article, or illustration of 25 words or less and include it and include it in your cover letter. A pitch is an eye catching, heart trapping summary of your book or article. It can also be called your “Hook.”

    Here is a great site to see a few pointers about writing a pitch: http://www.ehow.com/how_5824250_write_novel_pitch.html/.

    Read my blog entitled How to Entice an Editor/Agent with a Pitch (Logline).
    You can submit your pitch to the SCBWI list serve email group and ask them for suggestions on revisions of your pitch. Write it on a 3×5 inch card. If you can’t get it all written on the front side of the card, it’s too long.

    b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours would hook readers and attract them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

    c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

    4. Write your resume. Here is a link to Moira Allen’s site that will walk you through a good resume. http://www.writing-world.com/rights/resume.shtml

    a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

    b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

    c. Include all of your publishing credits.

    5. If necessary, write your proposal.

    a. Here’s a link to a site that also has videos on you-tube. http://www.bookproposalwriting.com/ Each time you read over your proposal, you will see something to add to make it more appealing to the editor to whom you are sending it.

    b. Book Proposal: “Selling Your Non-Fiction Book, Part II: Making Your Pitch”
    http://www.writing-world.com/publish/bookprop2.shtml

    Steps for Week Three for Pub Sub 3rd Fri: Pub Sub day is August 20, 2010

    1. Reread a hard copy of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

    2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud.

    3. If you see any errors, correct them.

    4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

    5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

    6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

    7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If email submission, follow their guidelines about attachments. Some publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

    8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope. Also put that fact in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On November 20, 2010 I am submitting it to other publishers.”

    9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

    10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

    11. If guidelines ask for a self-addressed stamped envelope, fix one and enclose it.

    12. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night.

    Pub Sub 3rd Friday
    13. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

    14. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

    Each time you submit, you will be getting better and better. In case you’re not ready on Friday, August 20, 2010, I created a raincheck with an encouraging letter filled with quotes to help you get your submission in the mail before a month elapses. You can also print just the Raincheck without the letter. Go to my website to copy a certificate, badge, or raincheck: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm

    See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more information.

    I would be honored if you would sign up for an email subscription to my blog from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column. The 50th person to subscribe from the left will receive a free paperback copy of Flip Flap Floodle or a 1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer.

    Please leave a comment, question, or resource.

    Never Give Up
    Live Today
    Joan Y. Edwards
    http://www.joanyedwards.com/FlipFlapFloodle.htm
    Author/Illustrator
    Flip Flap Floodle on Amazon.com

    Copyright 2010 Joan Y. Edwards. All rights reserved.

    Uplifting, Encouraging, Motivating, and Educational