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50 Publishers Who Accept Unsolicited Manuscripts


The Signs 41

Copyright © 2013-2017 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors.

“50 Publishers Who Accept Unsolicited Manuscripts” by Joan Y. Edwards

Your revised and edited manuscripts are saying:

“Send me to a publisher.  Send me. Send me. I’m ready!”

It’s okay if in the past you didn’t submit your work. Forget the past. Focus on right now. Check the guidelines for the publisher you’ve chosen. Look at the books they published. Do you like the illustrations on the covers? Are the books appealing to you?

If you’re like me, one of your stories says, “Send me to a publisher. Send me. Send me. I’m ready!” It’s waited anxiously for submission for days, months, or years. Now is the time to send your manuscript to a publisher. How can you turn down your sweet manuscript?

What? You’ve decided to do it now. Hurray!

It’s important to follow the very latest guidelines on the publisher’s website. Does this publisher accept unsolicited manuscripts?  Do they want paper or online submissions? Are there certain months, they don’t accept submissions?

Some companies may offer you the opportunity to self-publish or vanity publish with them. Don’t do it. Go to a traditional publisher who does not charge you money for anything. 

Adult

1. Baen Books (Adults) Submission Guidelines Specialized

Baen Books is a science fiction and fantasy publisher. It accepts unsolicited manuscripts for all books and prefers electronic submissions through its manuscript-submission form. Baen is very accepting of new authors and has a large e-publishing department.

2. Blaze Vox Books (Adults) Submission Guidelines – poetry and fiction submissions.

3. Chelsea Green Publishing (Adults) Submission Guidelines Specialized

4. DAW Books (Adults) Submission Guidelines Specialized

DAW Books is the science fiction and fantasy imprint of Penguin Books. It accepts unsolicited manuscripts and prefers them in paper form. It will respond in about three months and will not consider simultaneous submissions.

5. Chicago Review Press (Adults) Fiction, Nonfiction, Memoirs

6. Diversion Books (Adults)

Fiction: Romance (contemporary and historical), Thrillers, Mysteries, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Horror, and Young Adult 

Non-Fiction: Business, Sports, Health, True Crime, and platform-based general interest titles 

FAQs about Diversion Books

7. Harlequin Romance

8. Hub City Press

Hub City Press publishes books of literary fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, regional nonfiction, nature, and art.  Uses Submittable Software for submissions.

Hub City Press is not looking for submissions in the following categories: romance, science fiction, true crime, mystery, cookbooks, how-to books, horror/paranormal or specific-religion inspirational books. We also can no longer accept queries for poetry collections. We do not publish books for young people (YA, middle grade or children’s).

9. Joffe Books (Adult Novels)

  • Mysteries, Crime Fiction, Psychological Thrillers, Detective, Thrillers, and Suspense, are favourite genres
  • We’re not into kids books, sci-fi, non-fiction, conspiracy theories, or erotic (unless it’s amazing like Anais Nin) 

10. Kensington Publishing Corporation (Adults) Fiction and Non-Fiction. See this submission page for more information.

We are currently not accepting Children’s, Middle Grade, Young Adult or Poetry submissions.

11. NCM Publishing (Adults and Young Adult)

NCM editors are seeking tasteful provocative, intelligent fiction manuscripts in the areas of sexuality and erotica, romance, urban and street, science fiction, Christian fiction, and general interest, as well as nonfiction, and lively stories of all genres of fiction for the general population between the ages of 18 and older (as well as Young Adult fiction). 

11a McFarland Books

Non-Fiction only. McFarland welcomes proposals for nonfiction manuscripts on a wide range of subjects, not limited to the following: popular culture and performing arts (especially film, television, dance, gaming), military history (especially World War II and Civil War), international studies, health topics, sports (especially baseball, boxing, American football), automotive (and planes and trains), literary studies (including both classic and genre fiction, mystery, SF, fantasy, horror), medieval studies, mythology, folklore, and women’s and gender studies. Multicontributor manuscripts and edited collections of essays are welcome. We suggest you browse our catalog to get a feel for our offerings.

12. Press 53 (Adults poetry and short stories)

Uses Submittable Software for submissions.

13. Regal Crest Non-Fiction (Adults)

Topics of interest to both alternative (GLBTQ) readers as well as mainstream readers including, but not limited to humor, popular culture, current events and politics, psychology, erotica, education, health, sports, travel, pets, biography and memoir, social issues, and history. We are also interested in anthologies and How-To books (such as writing instruction), and depending upon the approach, we may also be interested in topics in the fields of business, sociology, and religion.

14. Persea Publishing (Adult and Young Adult)

15. Science Fiction and Fantasy Publications (Adults)

16. Sky Horse Publishing (Adult Non-Fiction)

17. City Lights Press (Adult and Young Adult)

18. Poets and Writers Small Presses Database for Poets and Writers (Adult)

Search for small publishers who publish poetry or collections of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction (memoir), etc. You can filter the genres and it will show you your choices.

 Adults and Children

19. Arthur A. Levine Books (Adults and Children)

20. August Books (Adults and Children)Adult books about storytelling and collections of folktales.

Children’s books – Original folktales

21. Chronicle Books (Adults and Children)

22. Dreaming Big Publications Submission Guidelines

(Calling for Submissions)

23. Free Spirit Publishing (Children, Teens, Parents, Educators, Counselors)

Free Spirit Publishing publishes high-quality nonfiction books and learning materials for children, teens, parents, educators, counselors, and others who live and work with young people.

24. Sterling Publishing (Adult and Children)

25. Stone Pier Press (Adult and Children)

26. TCK Publishing (Adult and Children)

Fiction and Non-Fiction

27. Woodbine House (Adult and will consider Children) (Marketing Plan)

Mostly publishes books for parents of disabilities and special needs, but said they would look at submissions for children’s books, too.

Children

28. Albert Whitman & Company (Children)

Picture book manuscripts for ages 2-8. Novels and chapter books for ages 8-12. Young adult novels. Nonfiction for ages 3-12 and YA. Art samples showing pictures of children.

29. Boyds Mills (Children)

Boyds Mills is the trade book division of Highlights for Children: publishes a wide range of high-quality titles for young readers—fiction and nonfiction picture books, middle grade and young teen fiction, and nonfiction novels. 

30. Calkins Creek (Children)

Division of Highlights for Children: publishes both nonfiction and historical fiction picture books and novels that introduce children to the many people, places, and events that have shaped US history. Calkins Creek titles present multiple points of view through original and extensive research, and each innovative and skillfully written book uses primary sources, such as timelines, bibliographies, historical notes, and glossaries.

31. Charlesbridge (Children)

Charlesbridge offers free activities and downloadable items:  http://www.charlesbridge.com/client/client_pages/downloadables.cfm

32. Curious Fox (Children)

Curious Fox does not publish picture books

33. Dawn Publications (Children)

Dawn publishes “nature awareness” titles for adults and children. Our picture books are intended to encourage an appreciation for nature and a respectful participation in it. We are seeking to inspire children as well as educate them. An inspired child is a motivated.

34. Dial Books For Young Readers (Children)

35. Flashlight Press (Children)

Flashlight accepts only picture books.

36. Guardian Angel Publishing (Children)

Open to submissions only from JULY 1, 2018 to AUGUST 31, 2018.

37. Highlights for Children (Children)

Highlights for Children Magazine, High Five Magazine, Hello Magazine, Hidden picture puzzles.

38. Ideals Children’s Books (Children)

39. Holiday House (Children)

40. Just Us Books and Marimba Books (Black and Multi-Cultural Children’s books) Click on Contacts and scroll down for submission guidelines.

41. Lee & Low Books (Children of Color)

Lee & Low Books publishes books for children and young adults with a multicultural theme. All manuscripts must be aimed at children of color, with an authentic voice. They accept submissions from new authors through regular mail. They accept no email submissions.

42. Little Pickle Press (Children) Middle Grade and Young Adult

43. Onstage Publishing (Children)  chapter books, middle grade novels and young adult novels

44. Peachtree (Children)

45. Redleaf Press (Children) Educational Market Must be related to early care and education issues and practices.

46. Ripple Grove Press (Children) Picture Books only (Ages 2-6)

47. Saguaro Books, LLC (Middle and Young Adult)

Saguaro Books, LLC is a publisher of middle grade and young adult fiction by first-time authors. They also accept unsolicited manuscripts.

48. Sky Pony Press (Children)

49. Tall Tails Publishing House (Children)

Small independent children’s press, Krystal Russell, Phone: 918-770-9923.

50. WordSong (Children) Poetry

WordSong is the only children’s imprint in the United States specifically dedicated to poetry. WordSong titles, both picture books and novels in verse, capture the vibrant, unexpected, and emotional connections between poetry of all types and young readers. 

RESOURCES

Charlotte Dillon has an awesome list of publishers and agents and many resources: http://www.charlottedillon.com/PubsAgents.html

Check these articles for romance publishers who accept unsolicited manuscripts:

Romance Publishers

  1. Karen Fox. “(Romance) Publishers:” http://www.karenafox.com/publishers.htm (worldwide)
  2. RTBookReviews. “Seven (Romance) Publishers Now Accepting Manuscripts:” http://www.rtbookreviews.com/rt-daily-blog/seven-publishers-now-accepting-manuscripts

Looking for an Agent? Check out “18 Literary Agents Who Are Looking for You:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2013/09/06/18-literary-agents-who-are-looking-for-you/

Use Pub Subbers to get your manuscript, query, cover letter, and/or proposal in gear:
Week 1 Send manuscript off for final critique before submission. Choose publisher or agent. Print Guidelines.
Week 2 Write pitch, query, cover letter, proposal, etc. to make a good impression.
Week 3 Proof read everything. Submit this week.

May you reach all of your heart’s desires!  Good luck with all your writing endeavors and your life.

Updated November 17, 2017.

Thanks for reading my blog. I hope you’ll subscribe.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Go ahead. Submit your work.

Enjoyable books:Please check out my books:
Flip Flap Floodle, Will this little duck’s song save him from Mr. Fox?
Joan’s Elder Care Guide A guide to help caregivers and their elders never give up.

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2013-2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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How to Reap the Most from the 2012 Fall SCBWI-Carolinas Conference


“How to Reap the Most from the Fall SCBWI-Carolinas Conference” by Joan Y. Edwards

The SCBWI-Carolinas Conference is September 28-30th. Here are a few hints to help you reap the most benefit from attending a writing conference. It’s in 3 parts: Before the Conference, During the Conference, and After the Conference. I hope that by reading my blog post or attending a conference, you’ll learn a writing skill or technique to inspire you to believe in yourself as a writer or an illustrator and never give up.

I am honored to tell you that I’ll be presenting an informal session at 8:45 p.m. on September 28th at the SCBWI-Carolinas Fall Conference called, “Blogging Basics.”

1. Why Blog and What Should I Blog? How Do I Find a Topic? Write a short opening blog and pictures.

2. How to Set Up a Blog on WordPress. Step-by-step Directions.

3. Actually set up a blog with WordPress or other blog service. I will schedule 15 minute sessions for 2 people at a time for Hands on Setting Up a Blog.

4. Post first blog and announce it on SCBWI-C list serve.

Before the Conference

1. What skill do you most want to improve? Attend the workshops that will help you improve that skill.

2. Visit the webpages of at least three of the presenters that interest you. Check out their books at your local library or on www.Amazon.com.

3. If you have specific questions for presenters, write them down and ask them at the conference. Most websites list a contact page with an email address, in case you don’t get to ask them then, you can write and ask them later.

4. Get business cards with your name, address, phone number, email address, website, and blog. Many people put an image and link to their published books on the back. Use  www.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.comwww.BCEofNC.com, or local print shop. You can also create business cards on your computer.

5. Get bookmarks printed: www.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.comwww.BCEofNC.com. You can also make bookmarks by hand or on your computer.

6. Buy a new spiral notebook with a bright colorful design or a composition book with a black and white cover. This way all of your notes are in one place. You can put it in front of your computer when you get home, and transfer your handwritten notes to your computer. You can add information from handouts by scanning them into your computer, or by typing what you want to remember from the handouts.

7. Buy two pens that write just the way you like a pen to write. Put them in your pocketbook to take with you.

8. Write a pitch for three of your manuscripts. Print out your pitches on 3×5 cards, 4×6 inch cards, or plain 8.5 x 11 printing paper. Carry two copies of each pitch with you to the conference. Put one copy in a folder and the other in your pocketbook. Practice giving your pitch in front of a mirror. Use eye contact. Memorize it.

9. Take comfortable clothing to wear in your favorite colors to keep your spirits high. Take a sweater or blazer, in case the air conditioning is too cool for your inner thermostat. If you’re hot, you can take off the blazer. Jeans, a shirt, and a blazer are good work attire for writers. Linda Rohrbough says that you want the editors to think you just left your computer to meet with them.

10. Check your laptop. Charge its battery. Purchase a portable disc drive or flash drive or thumb drive. Most of them are USB port compatible. Copy your full manuscripts of the Works in Progress and other pertinent information you may need for the conference.

At the Conference

1. Take notes using your new spiral notebook or composition book or take notes on your laptop or other device. When you get home, edit your notes and add information from your handouts. You can copy or scan pertinent information from the handouts into a computer.

2. Hand out business cards to everyone you with whom you talk. Ask for their business cards, too. This will give you resources to check after the conference. The more you do this, the more comfortable and natural it will be for you. Make a goal of handing out at least 5, 10, 15, or 20 cards.

3. Do you feel lonely and out of touch with people? Plan to talk to the people who sit beside you in the workshops. Exchange names, email addresses, and business cards with them. Here are possible questions to start your conversation:

“What are you writing?”
“Are you in writing group? Is it online or face-to-face?”
“How do you find time to write?”
“Do you write best in the morning or at night?”

4.  If you happen to meet an agent or editor in the elevator or at lunch, remember he/she is human, like you. Ask one of these questions or one of your own:

“What is your favorite project right now?”
“How do you know when a book is right for you?”
“What’s your advice for writers?”

5.  After your question for an editor or agent, there is a great possibility he/she will ask you, “What kind of writing do you do?” This is a perfect lead in for your pitch. Hold your head high. Look the editor/agent in the eye. Pretend he’s your best friend and tell him your pitch.

6. Take a short walk for exercise in between sessions.

7. Get plenty of sleep.

8. Eat healthy fruits, vegetables, and proteins. This will keep you alert and focused.

9. Enjoy yourself and learn as much as you can.

10. List twenty things for which you are thankful each morning before you get out of bed.

11. Thank the presenters and the organizers for what you liked about the conference. Make suggestions for improvements.

12. If you a book inspires you at the workshop, buy it or order it from your public library.

After the Conference

1. Sleep, if you’re tired. Accept yourself and others as you are. Focus on what you want. Be thankful for what you have. Be grateful for where you are. Put the fun back into your writing.

2. Read and organize your notes from each workshop. Write at least three major things you learned from each workshop. You can write down more details if you want.

3. Make a top ten list of things that you learned at the overall conference.

4. After this information soaks into your mind, body, and spirit, write/revise three writing goals using the skills and information you learned. (Be patient with yourself.)

5. Writing Skill/Genre Goals

a) Read ten books in your chosen genre and three books on the craft of writing and/or illustrating.

b) Revise your favorite manuscript and submit it to an editor or agent on the third Friday of the month (PubSub3rdFri).

6. Marketing Goals

a) Learn a new technology.

b) Submit manuscripts/sample illustrations to different agents and/or editors on a regular basis. (See my Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog posts)

c) Join my PubSub3rdFri – Pub Subbers Yahoo Group by sending an email to:
pubsubbers-subscribe@yahoogroups.com or write me at the email address from the left-hand column to let me know. Members post successes, ask other members for help. etc. The group has automated reminders for the weekly steps to get your work ready for submission.

d) Prepare a book presentation for schools/organization.

e) Prepare a proposal to present a workshop for a writing conference.

f) Prepare a pitch for a manuscript. Go from a page summary and then focus on the words to hook readers. Keep shortening your pitch: 200-100-50-25 words. The ultimate goal is a pitch that is 140 characters long (approximately 25 words) that fits in Twitter. If you have all these different lengths, you will have a pitch to use in your cover letter, proposal, and for the rave blurbs for the back cover of your book. Your pitch is the magnetic tool that will entice people to buy your book.

g) Prepare a post card, business card, bookmark, signature for email to promote you and your writing. Use your book titles and pitch blurbs.

7. Networking Goals

a) Create a website and/or blog.

b) Join a writer’s critique group.

c) Give book presentations/workshops for schools and organizations

d) Create an author/illustrator page on Facebook and post news of your publishing journey.

e) Create a Twitter Account. Twitter your blog posts and your publishing news.

f) Create a TweetDeck account to better organize Twitter, Facebook, and/or Linked-In.

g) Create a Glog (Big Poster) on Glogster: http://www.glogster.com

g) Visit the website of three people who shared a business card with you.  Email them. Here are possible points to include in your email. Remind them of how you enjoyed talking with them. Thank them for sharing a resource. Congratulate them on their manuscript or book. Compliment them for being brave if they read their story at open mike. Thank them for giving you a new way to look at a problem.

Below are four other articles to help you get the most out of a writing conference.

Kristen Lamb, “Getting the Most Out of Writing Conferences:” http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2010/04/07/getting-the-most-out-of-writing-conferences/.

Margo L. Dill, “Writers Conferences: Five Reasons Why You Should Go NOW, and How to Get the Most for Your Money:” http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/13-FE-MargoDill.html/.

Marita Littauer, “Four Keys for Writers Conference Success:” http://www.right-writing.com/conference-keys.html/.

Yvonne Russell, “Getting the Most out of a Writers’ Conference:” http://www.growyourwritingbusiness.com/?p=47/.

Thank you for reading my blog. I hope it leads you to have more faith in yourself. I hope you experience success in every way imaginable.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2012 Joan Y. Edwards

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