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One Point Perspective – Art


Pixabay one point perspective road-166543__480

Pixabay – Creative Commons

“One Point Perspective – Art” by Joan Y. Edwards

When I was in college at Western Carolina University, I took a few art courses. In one of them the instructor taught us one point perspective. We went outside and painted different buildings from across the street in one point perspective. My sister, Janet, says she still has those drawings. It’s amazing that watching You-Tube videos can refresh your memory and also give you new techniques to help you improve your drawing of things in perspective. I listed resources I personally liked that teach you one point perspective.

Definition: What is perspective?

Helen South states that “Perspective drawing gives a three-dimensional feeling to a picture. In art, it is a system of representing the way that objects appear to get smaller and closer together the further away they are in the scene.”

Things seem to get farther and farther away until they vanish at a point. Many times that point is near the middle of the page, but doesn’t have to. If you’re looking down the street, objects closer to you look larger than the objects farther away from you.

Here are a few other images that show you one point perspective:

Pixabay tree path road-21205__480

Pixabay Image – Creative Commons

Notice how everything seems to lead to one particular point in the images near the back of the picture. Everything close to you looks bigger and items farther away get smaller.  With the trees you can see more of he front tree than you can of the others. You can see more of the buildings that are closer to you, than the ones that are farther away.

Pixabay sidewalk-657906__480

Here are hints for drawing in one point perspective:

  • Make all diagonal (slanted) lines so that they come from the single dot vanishing point. The Vanishing Point marks where you stop seeing separate diagonal lines going away from you. It looks like they come together there. It makes things look smaller as they get farther away from your eyes. It makes things look larger as they get closer to your eyes. In other words, these diagonal lines that look like an upside down V help you see things on the page in perspective.
  • All straight lines across will be parallel with the horizon line.
  • All straight up and down (vertical) lines will be parallel with the right and left side edges of the paper.

Activities

Materials You’ll Need:  8.5 x 11 inch piece of paper, a ruler, a pencil, and a white eraser. 

If you are drawing a room in one point perspective, here is one way to begin:

IMG_0745

  1. Draw a line from the top left hand corner to the lower right hand corner of your paper.
  2. Draw a line from the top right hand corner to the lower left hand corner of your paper.
  3. Draw a straight line across the middle of the page. This will be your horizon line.
  4. Mark a dark dot in the middle of the horizon line. You can use a red colored pencil to help it stand out. This dot is called your vanishing point. 
  5. If you want, you can draw a rectangle to represent the wall at the far end of the room or hall.
  6. Now draw the hallway or room in detail with pictures on walls, desks, chairs, and doorways or windows.  Good luck😊!

If you are drawing a street scene, road, or railroad track scene, you might want to start with these directions:

IMG_0739

  1. Draw a straight line across the page close to the middle of the paper. This will be your horizon line.
  2. Draw a dot near the middle of the page. This will be your vanishing point.
  3. Decide how far apart you want your up-side-down V-shaped diagonal lines. Draw two diagonal lines that go from the vanishing point to the bottom of the page so that they are wider at the bottom.
  4. Draw the other items. Any slanted line will go through the vanishing point. The straight lines will be horizontal or vertical.

Exercises

  1. Print out one of the three pictures above or another one point perspective image from your own personal photo collection. Trace it or draw it using pencil and ruler. Be sure to note your horizon line and vanishing point, as well as the slanted, diagonal lines that all lead to the vanishing point.
  2. Sit in your front yard and sketch what you see in one point perspective.
  3. Sketch a hall scene from your house. Take a picture of it and draw it or sit at one end of the hall and draw it.
  4. Sketch a garden scene in one point perspective.

 

Resources

Graph Paper – Grid Paper

  1. Graph Paper Perspective. You can choose the size paper and how many inches you want the lines to be apart, etc. https://incompetech.com/graphpaper/perspective/
  2. Printable Paper.net. Free to print. One Point Perspective guide lines on paper
    Perspectivehttps://www.printablepaper.net/category/perspective

Written Step-by-Step with Images and Text

  1. http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/one-point-perspective-drawing
  2. C. Ibarra. “How to Create a Hallway With One Point Perspective:” https://snapguide.com/guides/create-a-hallway-with-one-point-perspective/
  3. Drawing Coach.com. “1 Point Perspective Drawing – Lesson 2 How to Draw a Circle:” http://www.drawingcoach.com/1-point-perspective.html
  4. Helen South.  “How to Draw One Point Perspective:” https://www.thoughtco.com/one-point-perspective-drawing-tutorial-1123412

Videos on You-Tube

  1. Fletcher Ceramics. “Easy 1 Point Perspective.” (brick building on a street)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFmek_sesfo
  2. Matt – Virtual Instructor. “One Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJYBMr5MKoo
  3. Melinda Nguyen “One Point Perspective – Streetscape:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phiEaRGBv-4
  4. Milton Kaynes You-tube Channel. “How To Draw A Room with One Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30tzJG6EOTo
  5. Otis Art Docents. “Lesson 5B – One Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twcFW0RyOO8
  6. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw 1-Point Perspective for Beginners: A Hallway:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ICyLN6I2cY
  7. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw a House in One-Point Perspective.”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i776k0zEzEc
  8. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw a Room in One-Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEymIyLbiAI
  9. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw Using One Point Perspective: (Railroad Track)” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRrKohWdpeQ

Thank you for reading my blog. I appreciate you very much. I’d love to hear from you.

Click comment below and scroll down to bottom of page to leave a comment.

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Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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    Live with Enthusiasm
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    Joan Y. Edwards
    Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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Never Give Up

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I Was Tagged in a Writer’s Game of Tag


“I Was Tagged in a Writer’s Game of Tag” by Joan Y. Edwards

http://www.freestockphotos.biz/stockphoto/16869

by Tjoepoe freestockphotos.biz
You’re It. I tagged you for a fun, inspirational, and enlightening blog.

On September 13, 2012, Linda Andersen, writer of “A Writer’s Playground” blog: http://www.lindamartinandersen.wordpress.com tagged me and asked me to play. The way the game is played, I tag four bloggers and ask that they share comments about what they’re writing on their blog and tag four other blogs.

I found this clever looking robot created by Tjoepoe on http://www.freestockphotos.biz. I thought he looked like he might play tag with us.

Here are four blogs to which I subscribe that are fun, inspirational, and enlightening.  I believe you would enjoy them, too.

My picks are:

1. Kena Paranjape In Life and in Fashion  She has really good advice about life and about fashion. She started her own business so she hasn’t been blogging as much. But the blog posts that are there are wonderful.

2. Daniel Postlethwaite’s blog Fresh Ink.  He showcases new writers. He has guest bloggers present their work or hints about writing.  You could post your work or critique work. Submit your work or guest blog to FreshInk@wordsformwindows.com

3.Suzie Townsend Confessions from Suite 500  Suzie is an agent with New Leaf Literary. She takes Middle Grade, Young Adult, and Adult queries in this blog and evaluates them. Follow her guidelines for the different blogposts and queries to her as an agent.

4 Tracy Marchini Tracy Marchini. Tracy writes Middle Grade and also is a freelance editor.

Here are my responses to the questions about my work in progress that accompanied this Tag game:

1. What is the working title of your book? Follow Your Immigrant Heart (by Joan Y. Edwards)

2. Where did the idea come from the book? In 2001, my husband, Carl and I were in a museum in Pueblo, Colorado that showed how Italian and other immigrants were mistreated at Ellis Island. How if they were lame, they marked an “L” on their shoulder and sent them back home. I thought of what it would be like to even think of having to separate from the ones you love so much. Would you go back, too? Or would you stay? Difficult choices: a dilemma because neither one is what the person wanted. I wrote a beginning called, “The Separation.” I only wrote a little about a young woman with a child and her grandfather, but it got really complicated with the baby and I only wrote a few pages. I later decided I wanted it for Young Adults and would leave the baby out.

3. What genre is your book? Historical Fiction, Mystery

4. Which actors would you choose to play the characters in a movie? Young Italian girl, aged 16. Old Italian Man in 70’s. Middle Aged Italian Man 30’s.

5. What is a one sentence synopsis of your book? In 1902, a young Italian girl’s dreams of high fashions and acceptance by her father are shattered when she arrives at Ellis Island and authorities mark an “L” for lame on her grandfather that might send them both back to Italy and she finds out that her father may have been killed in a train wreck.

6. Will your book be self-published, represented by an agency, or published by a traditional publisher? My goal is to have it published by a traditional publisher and to be on the New York Best Seller list.

7. How long did it take you to finish your first draft? 30 days in November during 2007 NaNoWriMo.

8. What other books would you compare yours to in this genre? Janna Mysteries by Felicity Ann Pulman. There are six of these. Rosemary for Remembrance is Book 1.

9. Who or what inspired you to write this book? See number 2.

10. What else about your book might pique a reader’s interest? The female protagonist is witty, smart, and will do anything to protect her family.

Linda, thanks again for inviting me to play tag with you and other bloggers. It was fun.

Read exciting interviews and activities for each month to inspire you on Linda’s blog at http://www.lindamartinandersen.wordpress.com.

We have 93 subscribers now. Thanks. Only 7 subscribers away from our big celebration. When we reach 100 subscribers, ten lucky subscribers will win a free pitch and 1000 word manuscript critiques. I’ll choose one winner from first ten subscribers, second ten, etc. One lucky person will win a free pitch and 5000 word manuscript critique. Would you like to win? Get your name in the hat, now.  Subscribe now by email from the left hand column.

Thank you for reading my blog. I hope you will come back often. It’s great to see you whenever you come.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2012 Joan Y. Edwards

After the Conference – 13 Ways to Optimize Your Learning


“After the Conference – 13 Ways to Optimize Your Learning” by Joan Y. Edwards

The conference was a fun, powerful blast of friendly writers, illustrators, editors and agents sharing expertise and spreading optimism and inspiration. I am thankful to Teresa Fannin, the SCBWI-Carolinas, Regional Administrator and her committee for the planning and organization of it.

I hope you learned a technique that inspires you to believe in yourself and to grow in your skills as a professional writer and/or illustrator.  My goal is to help you keep going and saying to yourself, like Flip Flap Floodle in my picture book, “I won’t give up.”

After the Conference

1. Sleep, if you’re tired. Accept yourself and others as you are. Focus on what you want. Be thankful for what you have. Be grateful for where you are. Put the fun back into your writing.

2. What skill did you most want to improve? Name 3 things that you learned from the workshop in that area.

3. Visit the webpages of at least three of the presenters that intrigued you. Check out their books at the library or on www.Amazon.com.

The following links are from the SCBWI-Carolinas Fall Conference 2011.

Amanda Brice, attorney and author: http://amandabrice.net/
Amy Lennex, editor with Sleeping Bear Press: http://www.sleepingbearpress.com/
Angie Smibert, award-winning author: http://www.angiesmibert.com/blog/
Beth Revis, award-winning author: http://www.bethrevis.com/
Bettina Restrepo, award-winning author: http://bettinarestrepo.com/
Carol Baldwin, author/educator: http://maupinhouse.com/index.php/authors/carol-baldwin.html
Chris Roerden, free-lance editor: http://www.writersinfo.info/about.html
Curtis Sponsler, media consultant: http://www.animill.com/_downloads/Sponsler-Curtis_GraphicArtist-resume_06.pdf
David Diaz, Caldecott award-winning illustrator: http://www.amazon.com/Smoky-Night-Caldecott-Medal-Book/dp/0152699546
Jenn Bailey, social media expert: http://www.thesociallites.com/jennbailey/
John Claude Bemis, award-winning author: http://johnclaudebemis.com/
Josh Adams, agent with Adams Literary Agency: http://www.adamsliterary.com/
Katy Kelly, award-winning author http://katykellyauthor.com/katy_kelly_lucyrose_melonhead/Katy_Kelly_Home_Page.html
Lucy Ruth Cummins,  Associate Art Director with Simon & Schuster BFYR: http://jacketknack.blogspot.com/2009/11/interview-with-lucy-cummins-at-simon.html
Mallory Kass, editor and author with Scholastic: http://bookwizard.scholastic.com/tbw/viewWorkDetail.do?workId=1316275
Mary Kate Castellani, editor with Bloomsbury Children’s Books: http://writergirl.myartsite.com/2009/10/20/paying-it-foward-day-2/
Marietta Zacker, agent with the Nancy Gallt Literary Agency: http://nancygallt.com/whoweare.html
Rachel Orr, agent with Prospect Agency: http://www.prospectagency.com/zoo.html
Susan Uhlig, award-winning author: http://www.susanuhlig.com/
Sheila O’Connor, award-winning author: http://www.sheilaoconnor.com/

4. If you had specific questions for presenters, but didn’t get to ask them at the conference, find their contact information page and write them.

5. Make note of errors you found on your business cards or postcards so you can change them next time you order.

6. Read, edit, and organize your notes. Copy or scan them into your computer, along with information from your handouts. Highlight three major things you learned from each workshop. Write more details, if you want. Put notes into the reference section of your writing/illustrating files so you’ll be able to find them quickly.

7. Rewrite your pitch for three of your manuscripts in view of what you learned at the conference.  Read my blog How to Deliver a Short Gutsy Pitch to Entice Editors, Agents, and Readers. Write your pitches on 3×5 cards, 4×6 inch cards, or plain 8.5 x 11 printing paper. Practice giving your pitch in front of a mirror. Use eye contact. Memorize it. Put it in 1, 2, 3, 4 order. It’ll help you remember it. Practice on the phone with friends. Practice in your critique groups. Tell people to ask, “What do you write?”

8. List top ten reasons you’re thankful you went to the conference.

9.  Send an individual letter to the organizers of the conference. Tell them what you liked and make suggestions for improvements or presentations you’d like next year.

10. After the conference information soaks into your mind, body, and spirit, write/revise three writing goals using the skills and information you learned. (Be patient with yourself.)

I allow myself to be a paid published writer/illustrator.

I allow my books to be on the New York Times Best Selling list.

I am happy and grateful that I am…

I am happy, excited, and grateful that I have…

I am happy, excited, and grateful that I can…

11. Develop your Writing/Illustrating Skills/Genre Goals

a) Read ten books in your chosen genre

b. Read three books on the craft of writing and/or illustrating.

c) Revise your favorite manuscript/illustration. Be a Pub Subber. Submit it to an editor or agent from the conference following their guidelines on the third Friday of the month (PubSub3rdFri).

12. Develop and Achieve Marketing Goals

a) Learn a new technology.

b) Be a Pub Subber. Submit manuscripts/sample illustrations to different agents and/or editors on a regular basis. (See my Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog posts)

c) Prepare a book presentation for schools/organization.

d) Prepare a proposal to present a workshop for a writing conference.

e) Prepare a pitch for a manuscript. Go from a page summary and then focus on the words to hook readers. Keep shortening your pitch: 200-100-50-25 words. The ultimate goal is a pitch that is 140 characters long (approximately 25 words) that fits in Twitter. If you have all these different lengths, you will have a pitch to use in your cover letter, proposal, and for the rave blurbs for the back cover of your book. Youll have a pitch to put in your book trailer. Your pitch is the magnetic tool that entices people to buy your book.

f) Prepare a post card, business card, bookmark, signature for email to promote you and your writing. Use your book titles and pitch blurbs.

13. Develop and Achieve Networking Goals

a) Create a website and/or blog.

b) Join a writer’s critique group.

c) Give book presentations/workshops for schools and organizations

d) Create an author/illustrator page on Facebook and post news of your publishing journey.

e) Create a Twitter Account. Twitter your blog posts and your publishing news.

f) Create a TweetDeck account to better organize Twitter, Facebook, and/or Linked-In.

g) Create a Glog (Big Poster) on Glogster: http://www.glogster.com

g) Visit the websites of three people who gave you a business card.  Email them. Here are possible points to include in your email. Remind them of how you enjoyed talking with them. Thank them for sharing a resource. Congratulate them on their manuscript or book. Compliment them for being brave, if they read their story at open mike. Thank them for giving you a new way to look at a problem.

Thank you for reading “After the Conference – 13 Ways to Optimize Your Learning.” I hope my blog leads you to have more faith in yourself. I hope you experience success in every way imaginable.

Please leave a comment. I value your opinion.

***I hope you’ll consider signing up for an email subscription to my blog from the left hand column. If you’re the 50th subscriber, you will win a choice of a free paperback copy of Flip Flap Floodle or a 1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer.  Thank you to everyone who has signed up for an email subscription.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2011 Joan Y. Edwards

How to Deliver a Short Gutsy Pitch to Entice Editors, Agents, and Readers


“How to Deliver a Short Gutsy Pitch to Entice Editors, Agents, and Readers” by Joan Y. Edwards

Your Gutsy Pitch will entice editors, agents, and readers

Is your ball (pitch) attached to a paddle? 

If you don’t ever pitch your story to a publisher or agent, how can you get it published?

Does your ball (pitch) have holes in it?

Have you told all the essential information to entice an editor or agent?

Does it matter if what you ball (pitch) is colorful and flashy?

Using colorful fonts, gifts, and flashing text won’t entice the editor or agent.

Use vivid and descriptive words – they’ll be enough to entice anyone.

Does it matter what size the ball (pitch) is? 

The logline, elevator pitch, and the Gutsy Pitch is short enough to get an editor, agent, or reader’s interest in 30 seconds or less.

If an editor or agent asks you for a plot summary, query pitch, summary pitch or a 100-150 word pitch, you give additional engaging and intriguing information about your characters and plot.

Today I’m focusing on what I call the Short Gutsy Pitch.

Like a ball attached to a paddle, it could be that you don’t know how to pitch. You don’t know if you’ve got something ready to pitch. You feel you can’t do it. It has you muddled. You are frozen on the pitcher’s mound of your writing career.

If you were a pitcher for the Colorado Rockies, you’d know what to pitch and how to pitch. Here is a video of Colorado Rockies baseball pitcher, Ulbado Jimenez: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5gSHz9_n0s

You’re a professional writer. You need to know what a pitch is, when to write a pitch and how to write a pitch to get on a major league team with publishers, agents, and thousands of readers.

In this article, I explain what a pitch is, why you need a pitch, how to write a pitch, and where to find pitches to study. WIIFY(What’s In It For You) By the end of this article, you’ll know how to write your pitch to wow editors, agents, and thousands of readers.

Amy Burkhart, agent, says the pitch has to tell, “Who, What, When, Where, and Why should I care?”

Kathleen Antrim, award-winning author, says a pitch must tell, “What if… and so what?”

A pitch must tell who the character is, what their situation is, and tell us why we should care. That helps readers connect emotionally with a story.

What is a pitch? A group of words chosen to compel editors, agents, and thousands of readers to have an obsessive need to read your book to find out the rest of the story…to find out what happens. Screenplay pitches are called log lines. A pitch is used in person, online, chats, query letters, cover letters, proposals, and on the covers of books.

A pitch tells about the situation your main character is in, describes what he wants so badly that when his world falls apart and his way to the goal is blocked, he’s willing to do ridiculous, difficult, risky, death-defying, and life changing things to achieve it. He won’t let anyone or anything keep him from reaching his goal.

Write your pitch before you write your story. It will help you write a better story. If you’ve already written your story, write your pitch now.

A pitch is a teaser – a hook that grabs the listener’s attention through his head, heart, and soul. When a bookseller reads a catalog with a listing of 400 books, you have only 15-20 seconds to capture his interest. When talking to another person, you have 30 seconds before their attention wanders elsewhere.

Choose 17-25 words of the most crucial information for your pitch that summarize the main character, flaw, situation, conflict, and aha moments to entice editors, agents, and thousands of readers to read your story.

If you were an editor, would you buy your book after hearing your pitch? If not, rewrite your pitch.

Write your pitch on a card (business card, index card, or poster). Put it in your wallet or put it on your mirror in the bathroom. Be creative. Be able to tell it with ease to anyone who asks what you write. If an editor or agent asks you for a plot summary or a 100-150 word pitch, you give additional engaging and intriguing information about your characters and plot.

Short Gutsy Pitch Parts

Part 1 Introduction to You and Your Book: Your Name, Title of Book, Genre, and Word Count

Part 2: Short Gutsy Pitch (Synonym logline, elevator pitch): Main Character, What He Wants, What Stops Him, What is his worst case situation?(Tells who, what, when, and where) (Tells the what if)

Part 3: How Does the Main Character Change to Overcome Obstacles? (Tells editors/agents/readers Why Should I Care?)

Part 4: What Does the Main Character Learn (Universal Theme) (Emotional Premise) (Tells the editor/agent/reader Why Should I Care?)

                                                                                  

Short Gutsy Pitch Parts in Detail

Part 1 Introduction to You and Your Book

My Name, Title of book, Genre, and Word Count

My name is ______. Title is a magazine article, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult, non-fiction with  ____ words. If it’s a series, you can mention this here.

Part 2: Short Gutsy Pitch: Main Character, What He Wants, What Stops Him, What is his worst case situation?

Short Gutsy Pitch (Logline, Elevator Pitch) Choose 17-25 words, one or two sentences, For screenplays, it’s called a logline. In his “I Wrote a 120 Page Script, But Can’t Write a Logline,http://www.twoadverbs.com/loglinearticle.htm, Christopher Lockhart says a logline (elevator pitch, short gutsy pitch) has to have:

who the story is about (protagonist)
what he strives for (goal)
what stands in his way (antagonistic force).

You find these gutsy pitches in newspapers, movies, on book covers, query letters, etc. I don’t recommend comparing your work to other titles in your pitch. I think it distracts from your story and doesn’t explain enough about the main character’s problem and situation. However, if you feel compelled to put Star Wars meets Gone with the Wind, add it to the front of your short gutsy pitch (logline).

James Sallis wrote the book, Drive:  A Hollywood stuntman who moonlights as a getaway driver for thieves finds that a price has been put on his head after a failed robbery. Read more of pitch: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/drive_2011/

Sophie Kinsela wrote the book, Confessions of a Shopaholic: A college grad lands a job as a financial journalist in New York City to support her shopping addiction and falls for a wealthy entrepreneur. Read more of pitch: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/confessions_of_a_shopaholic/

Dale Launer write the script for My Cousin Vinny: When sweet Northern college boy and his buddy Stan are picked up and thrown into the slammer in a hick Alabama town, at first it looks like no big deal. Then they are informed that they are accused of murder. Read more of pitch: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/my_cousin_vinny/

It is a story about a the main character

(tell age and sex, use character name if you like, but it’s not essential)

(if historical fiction, tell the year and the place)

who is (describe character’s flaw and bottom of the pit, life-changing situation that forces him to act)

Who wants _____________________ more than anything else in the world? What is the crisis?

What is the problem? But Opponent, Unexpected Bad Happenings, Terrible Consequences _______________ stop him (Why Can’t He Get It?)

Apparent Defeat – Disaster – Describe the bottom of the pit situation that seems hopeless and where the character appears doomed to failure. Make the pitch a cliffhanger.

Part 3: What Does He Do and How Does the Main Character Change to Solve the Problem? (Icing on the Cake)

At a workshop and in her iPhone application, “Pitch Your Book,” Linda Rohrbough suggests that when writing a pitch, writers include how the main character changes while striving to reach his goal. The short gutsy pitch hooks your audience. The change your character goes through thoroughly is the icing on the cake that convinces them that they need to read your manuscript. Change is essential to a story. Chances are if no one changes, there is no story. That’s why the editors and agents want to know the change.

In “Our Idiot Brother,” the main character did not change, however other people’s opinions of him changed. It reminds me of how a boy at 18 might think his father is dumb. However, when this same boy reaches 25, he realizes how wise his father was. Did the father change? No. But the boy changed in his attitude about his father. The boy had experiences that made him see his father differently.

Part 4: What Does the Main Character Learn about Himself and/or about Life? What does the experience of the main character in this story teach him about life? What does your story prove? What is the universal theme? What is the emotional premise for your story?

State what the main character learn about himself and about life in general from striving to reach this goal? State a belief that is proved in your story. After you explain it in terms of the story experience, then put it in terms of universal theme, like…love plus deception leads to death. Or use a saying, proverb, or cliché.

Joan’s Emotional Premises for Movies

Blind Side (2009) Premise: trust plus compassion leads to family. Saying, proverb, cliche: One person can make a difference.  For more pitch information: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/1212694-blind_side/

Love Story (1970) Premise: courage versus illness leads to unselfish love. Saying: Perfect love means unselfishness. For more pitch information: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/love_story/

Confessions of a Shopaholic (2009) Premise: addiction plus respect leads to love. Saying: Practice What You Preach. For more pitch information: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/confessions_of_a_shopaholic/

Notes:  If you find conflicting opinions about this topic, go with your gut instinct.

Places to Find Pitches to Study

TV Guide
Newspaper listing of movies
Theaters listing of movies
Amazon Book listings
Back cover of your favorite books
Library book listings online
http://www.Rotten Tomatoes.com (for movies)

Other questions, people might ask you after your Short Gutsy Pitch.

How does your story end?
Why does this story belong with this publishing company or agent?
Why did you write this story?
Is it educational, inspirational, or entertaining?
What makes you the expert or the right person to write this story?
Are there other books in the market similar to this?
How will you help market this book?
Have you had any other works published?

Below is a pitch from one of my personal manuscripts. I hope they give you an idea of things to put in your pitch.  I left the parts named in it.

Short Gutsy Pitch  

Part 1 My Name, Genre, and Word Count

Hi, my name is ___________. Caesar and Cleopatra is Adult Romance and Intrigue, with 60,000 words.

Part 2: Plot, Character, Flaw, Situation, Internal/External Goal, Opponent, Ally, Apparent Defeat:

A young woman wants to marry. However, her intended’s son, job, and past keep getting in the way. She goes back in time and gets stuck in Cleopatra’s tomb. She strives to get out in time to stop the changes that will kill those she loves in the present time.

Part 3: How does the main character change to Overcome Obstacles?

She gains faith in herself and accepts others as they are.

Part 4: What does the main character learn (Universal Theme):  

She learns that she likes the present circumstances better than any that could be changed in the past. Love plus acceptance leads to wisdom.

Realize that your pitch must sound smooth when you tell it or when you place it in your pitch query. Call a friend and read your Gutsy Pitch. Send them an email with the pitch in it. Let them read it to you. Smooth out any rough edges in your delivery. I separated the parts so you would know what belongs where. However, you can deliver it in two paragraphs. The first paragraph entices with a “Wow.” The second paragraph holds them hostage. They’ve got to know what happens now. They’ll ask for your manuscript or buy a copy of your book.

Hi, my name is ___________. Caesar and Cleopatra is Adult Romance and Intrigue, with 60,000 words. A young woman wants to marry. However, her intended’s son, job, and past keep getting in the way. She goes back in time and gets stuck in Cleopatra’s tomb.

She strives to get out in time to stop the changes that will kill those she loves in the present time. She stops being selfish, gains faith in herself, and accepts others as they are. She learns that she likes the present circumstances better than any that could be changed in the past. Love plus acceptance leads to wisdom.

In this article, I explained what a pitch is, why you need a pitch, how to write a pitch, and where to find pitches to study.

How did I do? Do you know and understand about what to put in your pitch to wow editors, agents, and thousands of readers and hold them hostage until they read your book? Why?

Please leave a comment and let me know. Tell me where I confused or muddled you with foggy explanations. Tell me where I explained it clearly. I enjoy hearing from you.

I would be honored if you would sign up for an email subscription from the left hand column.

Please leave a comment below. I value your opinions.

Do something fun to celebrate you and your life. Check out the 26 Resources I used to write this article below.

Joan Y. Edwards
http://www.joanyedwards.com

26 Resources I used for this article: 

  1. Amy Burkhardt, agent, Kimberley Cameron & Associates, http://www.kimberleycameron.com/amy-burkhardt.php, “Who, What, When, Where, and Why Should I Care?” CD, http://www.vwtapes.com/whowhatwhenwherewhyshouldicarecd.aspx.
  2. Bill Lundy  “Create a Killer Log Line” http://writermag.com/The%20Magazine/Online%20Extras/2011/02/Create%20a%20killer%20log%20line.aspx
  3. Brian Godawar “How to Write a Pitch Letter for a Freelance Article” http://www.helium.com/items/2159225-how-to-write-a-pitch-letter-for-a-freelance-article.
  4. Cammy Tang, has a critique service, http://storysensei.blogspot.com/2005/08/50-word-elevator-pitch.html.
  5. Christopher Lockhart, “Logline,” http://twoadverbs.site.aplus.net/loglinearticle.htm.
  6. Cynthia Gallagher “How to Pitch Your Book at a Conference” http://www.writing-world.com/publish/pitch2.shtml
  7. David Macinnis Gill, “How to Write a Log Line,” http://davidmacinnisgill.com/2009/08/01/how-to-write-a-log-line/.
  8. Donna Ippolito, “Secrets of the Short Story,” http://www.expert-editor.com/id7.html.
  9. Dwight V. Swain, Techniques of the Selling Writer, http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0806111917/camysloft-20/.
  10. Guide to Writing a Book Pitch  http://bubblecow.co.uk/blog/2010/08/22/a-guide-to-writing-a-book-pitch-for-penguin-books/
  11. John Robert Marlow, “Building the Perfect Logline for Your Book, Screenplay, or Other Story,” http://makeyourbookamovie.com/building-the-perfect-logline-for-your-book-screenplay-or-other-story/441/.
  12. Kathy Kennedy and Dennis G. Jerz “Get Started: Emergency Tips,” http://jerz.setonhill.edu/writing/creative1/shortstory/
  13. Kimberly Howe. “Pitch Tips,” http://www.thrillerfest.com/agentfest/pitch-tips/.
    1. Kathleen Antrim http://www.thrillerfest.com/agentfest/pitch-tips/.
    2. Jon Land http://www.thrillerfest.com/agentfest/pitch-tips/.
  14. Kristi Helvig. “Two Minute Elevator Pitch,” http://www.sistersinscribe.com/2010/04/two-minute-elevator-pitch.html.
  15. Lee Nordling. “What It Takes to Sell Your Pitch Part 1” (The secret to the pitch-Tell the good part)http://www.comicsbulletin.com/wolfman/106478386819087.htm
  16. Lee Nordling. “What It Takes to Sell Your Pitch Part 2” http://www.comicsbulletin.com/wolfman/106538301215335.htm
  17. Lee Nordling. “What It Takes to Sell Your Pitch Part 3” (Publishers play in a certain sandbox) http://www.comicsbulletin.com/wolfman/10659851965461.htm
  18. Linda Rohrbough. Pitch Your Book, iPhone application http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pitch-your-book/id432755697?mt=8&ls=1.
  19. Maeve Maddox. “Writing a Pitch,” http://www.dailywritingtips.com/writing-a-pitch/.
  20. Moira Allen. “Selling Your Nonfiction Book, Part II: Making Your Pitch,” http://www.writing-world.com/publish/bookprop2.shtml.
  21. Rachelle Gardner, agent. “Questions for Crafting Pitch,” http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/07/secrets-of-a-great-pitch-2/ and http://cba-ramblings.blogspot.com/2010/09/11-questions-for-crafting-pitch.html.
  22. Randy Ingermanson. http://www.advancedfictionwriting.com/art/snowflake.php.
  23. Scriptologist.com. “Logline: What It Is, Why You Need It, How to Write It,” http://www.scriptologist.com/Magazine/Tips/Logline/logline.html.
  24. Squidoo.com. “The Logline. The Dreaded Logline:” http://www.squidoo.com/screenwriting-a-quick-guide-to-writing-a-killer-logline
  25. 2008 SCBWI-Carolinas Fall Conference – “Pitch Session” with Alan Gratz and Pam Zollman, et al.
  26. 2010 Pikes Peak Conference “How to Pitch Your Book” and “How to Talk with Editors and Agents” with Linda Rohrbough.

 

Copyright © 2011 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors.

 

Week 4: Educate and Motivate the Creative Muse (PubSub3rdFri)


Small Badge Pub Sub 3rd Fri

“Week 4: Educate and Motivate the Creative Muse” by Joan Y. Edwards

During Week 4 you can spend time to educate and motivate the creative muse within you. Here are a few choices:

1. Experience Life, attend workshops, take courses.

a. Bake cakes.
b. Go on a tour of an Historic house.
c. Attend a weekend workshop.
d. Volunteer at a homeless shelter for children.
e. Take a writing course at a community college or other learning institution.

2. Read three books about the craft of writing.

a. Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis
b. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction
c. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel
d. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook
e. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel
f. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II
g. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Mystery
h. James N. Frey The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth
i. Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact
j. Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories
k. Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages
l. Jordan E. RosenfeldMake a Scene
m. Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch
n. Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

3. Read three best-selling books in your favorite genre.

4. Watch three movies in the genre you write.

5. Study the websites of three best-selling authors.

Here is a list of many to choose from or search for your favorite online.

Best-Selling Authors for Children

James Patterson http://www.jamespatterson.com/

Rick Riordan http://www.rickriordan.com/

Jeff Kinney http://www.wimpykid.com/

Victoria Kann http://www.ilikeart.com/

Jane O’Connor http://www.fancynancyworld.com/

Suzanne Collins http://www.suzannecollinsbooks.com/

J. K. Rowling http://www.jkrowling.com/

Best-Selling Authors for Adults

John Grisham http://www.jgrisham.com/

George R. R. Martin http://georgerrmartin.com/

Catherine Coulter http://www.catherinecoulter.com/

Janet Evanovich http://www.evanovich.com/

6. Study and find three matching three publishers and agents for your manuscripts:

a. Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

b. Sally Stuart’s Christian Writers’ Market Guide http://stuartmarket.com/default.aspx

c. Children’s Writer’s And Illustrator’s Market, Writer’s Digest Books.http://www.amazon.com/2012-Childrens-Writers-Illustrators-Market/dp/1599632314

d. Writer’s Market by Writer’s Digest Books http://www.amazon.com/2012-Writers-Market-Robert-Brewer/dp/1599632268

c. Visit the Preditors & Editors website to check out the editors and agents you’ve chosen. It’ll tell you if they are legitimate or warn you about them. http://pred-ed.com/

f. Check the submission guidelines of the websites of the publishers and agents of three of your favorite books.

7. Write.

I hope you find the right experiences to educate and motivate the creative muse in you.

Become a Pub Subber.

You’re a Pub Subber when you submit one or more of your quality works on the third Friday of the month (or any other day of the month) to critique groups, editors, agents, or contests.  You believe that submitting work often leads to publication.

If you’d like your name listed on the Pub Subbers page, leave a comment or send an email to me at the email address in the left-hand column with your name, the title of your manuscript and where you sent it. Include your webpage or blog, if you like.

Surround yourself with other Pub Subbers.  Great minds wander in the same plane.

I invite you to join the Pub Subbers Yahoo group to post successes, receive encouragement when you receive a no, ask for advice or help, etc. The group has automated reminders for the weekly steps to get your work ready for submission. Join by sending an email to pubsubbers-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more reasons to submit your work often: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/?s=pubsub3rdfri.

Thank you for reading my blog.  Leave a comment, please. I love reading your stories and opinions.

Celebrate Yourself
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2011-2012 Joan Y. Edwards

Week Two: Writing the Pitch, Query Letter, Proposal, Resume (PubSub3rdFri)


PubSub3rdFri Participant

Pub Sub 3rd Fri Participant

“Week Two: Writing the Pitch, Query Letter, Proposal, Resume” (PubSub3rdFri)

Thanks for joining me in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, illustration, song, or book manuscript to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year or longer. I’m glad I can count you in.

You’ve said to yourself, “I can do it.” You’ve taken action. During Week One, you sent your creative work to your critique group or to a professional editing service for critique. You chose the publisher for this month’s submission. You printed out this publisher’s guidelines and saved them to your computer in your submissions folder.

Now here are the steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri – Week Two to take to help you achieve the PubSub3rdFri goal for the month.

Week Two
1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

  1. If the guidelines say to write a query letter and not to send the manuscript, then write your query letter. You can go to Query Shark http://queryshark.blogspot.com/ and check out Charlotte Dillon’s website http://www.charlottedillon.com/query.html/. She has a query sample, names of books, and links to online articles about query letters. Awesome resource! Here’s another telling you how to write a pitch letter for that in-depth article you’ve written: http://www.ehow.com/how_2117753_write-pitch-letter.html
  2. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it. Good sources for cover letter notes are Moira Allen’s http://www.writing-world.com/basics/cover.shtml and http://resourcesforwriters.suite101.com/article.cfm/how_to_write_a_cover_letter/.

a. Write a pitch for your manuscript, article, or illustration of 25 words or less and include it and include it in your cover letter. A pitch is an eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article. It can also be called your “Hook.” Here is a great site to see a few pointers about writing a pitch: http://www.ehow.com/how_5824250_write_novel_pitch.html/. You can submit your pitch to the SCBWI list serve email group and ask them for suggestions on revisions of your pitch. Write it on a 3×5 card. If you can’t get it all written on the front side of the card, it’s too long.

b. Mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours would hook readers and attract them to it.

c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

  1. Write your resume. Here is a link to Moira Allen’s walking your through a good one: http://www.writing-world.com/rights/resume.shtml

a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

c. Include all of your publishing credits.

  1. If necessary, write your proposal. Here’s a link to a site that also has videos on you-tube. http://www.bookproposalwriting.com/

 

Hopefully, at the end of this year, you will have submitted more creative work than you did last year! That’s something to be proud of! That is a great gift to give yourself!

I hope you hear a publisher say, “YES, I’d like to buy this manuscript of yours.”

Become a Pub Subber.

You’re a Pub Subber when you submit one or more of your quality works on the third Friday of the month (or any other day of the month) to critique groups, editors, agents, or contests.  You believe that submitting work often leads to publication.

If you’d like your name listed on the Pub Subbers page, leave a comment or send an email to to me at the address from the left-hand column with your name, the title of your manuscript and where you sent it. Include your webpage or blog, if you like.

Surround yourself with other Pub Subbers.  Great minds wander in the same plane.

I invite you to join the Pub Subbers Yahoo group to post successes, receive encouragement when you receive a no, ask for advice or help, etc. The group has automated reminders for the weekly steps to get your work ready for submission. Join by sending an email telling why you’d like to join to pubsubbers-subscribe@yahoogroups.com or to me at joanyedwards1@gmail.com/.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more reasons to submit your work often: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/?s=pubsub3rdfri.

Thank you for reading my blog.  Leave a comment, please. I love reading your stories and opinions.

Celebrate Yourself
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2011-2012 Joan Y. Edwards

Week One: Choose Publisher/Agent. Get Work Critiqued (PubSub3rdFri)


Participant Badge of Pub Sub 3rd Fri
Week One: Choose Publisher/Agent. Get Work critiqued.” by Joan Y. Edwards

Here are the steps for Week One to submit your work to a publisher on the third Friday of the month.  It can be an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie.

Like the little duck in Flip Flap Floodle say, “I won’t give up.” Get your creative work ready to send off. Go For It.

Automotive and assembly line industrialist Henry Ford said “Whether You Think You Can or think you can’t, You are Right.” Start today to say you can. Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I CAN DO IT. I CAN REALLY DO IT.”

Week One

1. Study and find three matching three publishers and agents for your manuscripts:

a. Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

b. Sally Stuart’s Christian Writers’ Market Guide http://stuartmarket.com/default.aspx

c. Children’s Writer’s And Illustrator’s Market, Writer’s Digest Books.http://www.amazon.com/2012-Childrens-Writers-Illustrators-Market/dp/1599632314

d. Writer’s Market by Writer’s Digest Books http://www.amazon.com/2012-Writers-Market-Robert-Brewer/dp/1599632268

c. Visit the Preditors & Editors website to check out the editors and agents you’ve chosen. It’ll tell you if they are legitimate or warn you about them. http://pred-ed.com/

f. Check the submission guidelines of the websites of the publishers and agents of three of your favorite books.

2. Make a list of three possible publishers for this particular creative work of yours.
a. Read all three publishers’ guidelines.
b. Select the publisher you will use this month.
c. Print out a copy and save a copy of the publisher’s guidelines.

3. Fine tune your manuscript
a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.
b. Ask your writing group  or a professional writer/editor to critique your work.

Become a Pub Subber.

You’re a Pub Subber when you submit one or more of your quality works on the third Friday of the month (or any other day of the month) to critique groups, editors, agents, or contests.  You believe that submitting work often leads to publication.

If you’d like your name listed on the Pub Subbers page, leave a comment or send an email to my address from the left-hand column with your name, the title of your manuscript and where you sent it. Include your webpage or blog, if you like.

Surround yourself with other Pub Subbers.  Great minds wander in the same plane.

I invite you to join the Pub Subbers Yahoo group to post successes, receive encouragement when you receive a no, ask for advice or help, etc. The group has automated reminders for the weekly steps to get your work ready for submission. Join by sending an email to pubsubbers-subscribe@yahoogroups.com or to my address from the left-hand column to let me know.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri posts for more reasons to submit your work often: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/?s=pubsub3rdfri.

Thank you for reading my blog.  Leave a comment, please. I love reading your stories and opinions.

Celebrate Yourself
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2011-2012 Joan Y. Edwards

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