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21 Book Marketing Tips for Authors


21 marketing tips for authors

“21 Book Marketing Tips for Authors” by Joan Y. Edwards

Writing a book is a wondrous feat and getting it published is another great accomplishment. Selling your book is the next step and it is a very interesting endeavor today. You have to plan and take action. To make money; you have to spend money and/or time. You must be creative. Choose things to do that are fun for you. I suggest you work on three of them at a time. Choose two that you can do without any problem and one with a little challenge to it. Reward yourself for each step you complete.

I’ve read through many online sources and books about marketing to sell both Flip Flap Floodle and Joan’s Elder Care Guide.

I listed the resources I’ve found helpful. These marketing tips are ones I’ve used personally, witnessed other authors use them successfully, or plan to take action to make them a reality myself.

1. Place a profile on About.me. Mark Coker recommends this as a way to put all of your information in one place that many people look first. Place an About Me file on your website and blog.

2. Make a Facebook Author Page and a Facebook Personal profile page.

3. Twitter  – Open a Twitter personal account. Post about things relating to the book you’re writing. Follow and retweet other people’s tweets relevant to your favorite topics.

4. Set up pre-orders for your book. Helps build tension so people anticipate the big release date. After the release of your first book, as soon as you get the second book ready, do a pre-order for it. On the last page of your first book, let people know about your second.

5. Create a Video Trailer for your book.

Joanna Penn. “How to Create a Book Trailer:” http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2011/01/07/how-to-create-a-book-trailer/

Sandra Warren. “Book Trailers Made Easy:” http://sandrawarrenwrites.blogspot.com/2016/01/book-trailers-made-easy.html

6. Send out a News Release before your book launch. Put your press releases on your website. PRlog sends out free press releases (https://www.prlog.org/)

Sample Press Release

Rob Bignell. “Press Release: Advice on Day Hiking with Children:” https://www.prlog.org/11593433-new-book-provides-valuable-tips-advice-on-day-hiking-with-children.html; 

Stephen King. “Book Release American Vampire:” http://stephenking.com/promo/american_vampire/press_release/

7. Obtain 50 reviews of your books on Amazon, GoodReads, and Barnes & Noble. Use 50 as your top goal but be happy and celebrate each review you get. According to Brooke Warner Huffington Post, you need 50 reviews for Amazon to give you special notice. Be willing to give people who commit to review your book  a free PDF, Kindle, or paperback copy for their review.

If it’s an ebook on Kindle and you belong to GoodReads, Kindle asks you to review the book when you finish it. It posts it on both Amazon and GoodReads for you at the same time. 

It’s exciting to watch your book ranks after your book is released. To find statistics about your book sales and book rankings:

Sign into Amazon’s Author Central. It gives you the number of books sold. http://www.amazon.com/authorcentral

Check the listing of Best-Selling Authors from top down: https://www.amazon.com/author-rank

Ranks Amazon Book Sales  – website and app. https://www.novelrank.com/; 

I have 14 reviews on Joan’s Elder Care Guide and 18 for Flip Flap Floodle. So I need a lot more reviews to hit the lucky number of 50 reviews for each. If you’d be willing to do a review of either book for me, please let me know. I’ll send you a paperback copy. I’ll be willing to do a book review for you, too.

Put whole reviews or snippets of reviews with a book cover image and a link to purchase your book on your blog, website, emails, Facebook, Twitter, and your favorite social media.

8. Create Slide Presentation for your website. Linked-In has SlideShare where you can create and share slides about you, your writing, and your books. This SlideShare can be embedded on other people’s websites or blogs. You can even share it on your personal website or blog, too. To do the Linked-In SlideShare, go to Robert Sisson’s step by step directions: https://www.slideshare.net/RobertSisson/how-to-upload-your-powerpoint-slides-to-slideshare?qid=e74460bd-5446-41d3-894b-37cffb952803&v=&b=&from_search=11

9. Blog Tour – Ask 10 or more bloggers to interview you as a guest. Stagger the interviews. Have one each day for a week or two weeks. Include one review or snippets from 3 reviews with an image of your book cover and a link to purchase your book.

10. Book Blitz on the day of your book release – Ask 10 or more bloggers to put a copy of the specialized Book Blitz notices (format similar to a news release) on their blogs.

Sample Book Blitz:

Joan’s Elder Care Guide: Empowering You and Your Elder to Survive by Joan Y. Edwards

New Book? Spread the Word with a Blogging Book Blitz

11. Have a Book Launch Facebook or Twitter party

Lori Taylor. “10 Tips for a TweetWorthy Twitter Party:” http://lorirtaylor.com/top-10-tips-for-a-tweetworthy-twitter-party/

Lynne Hinkey. “Virtual Book Party” https://writerswin.com/virtual-book-party/

Katherine Mayfield. “Hosting a Book Launch Party on Facebook:” http://fundsforwriters.com/hosting-a-book-launch-party-on-facebook/

12. Create a book club study guide or teacher’s study guide for your book. Rob Bignell says this is a good way to entice book club members to buy copies of your book.

Sample Study Guide

“Charlotte’s Web Teacher’s Guide:” https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/unit-plans/teaching-content/charlottes-web-teachers-guide/

13. Make and distribute promotional materials: bookmarks, postcards, and business cards. You can print a coupon on the back of some of your business cards that say. If you’d like a free book, ask me for details. Willing to do a review – Free copy of book or something similar. Ask me: How can I get a free copy of your book?

14. Place a copy of you book in waiting rooms. Rob Bignell says to write a note inside your book that says, “Please leave for others to enjoy.”

15. Get your book into at least 2 local bookstores. If you or your publisher does not have a return book policy, you may want to see if local bookstores or businesses related to the subject of your book would sell your books on consignment. If your publisher has a return book policy, it will be easier to get your books on the shelves in a store.

16. Have a book signing event. Do a reading or a presentation. Mingle with the people in the store. 

17. Have contests to win copies of your book or give away copies of unpublished writing.

18. Do a joint venture advertising campaign with 2-4 other authors with similar subjects or genres or who live in your area or travel together to different states.

19. Ask your readers to write, call, and visit your local library and ask them to order your book. Make sure your ISBN number is on your business card or on your website.

20. Write articles for organizations, newspapers, blogs, ezine articles, HubPages. Rob Bignell says they pay freelance writers for writing. Perhaps they will allow a byline and add the title of your book, a book cover image, and a link to purchase it.

21. Set up a Google Alert for you book title, book subject, and your name. They will email you daily or weekly articles that contain the words you designate. This may help you find blogs or magazines with articles about your subject. Then you can pursue writing for them, doing a guest blog, etc.

Jessica Knapp. “How to Set Up a Google Alert and Why It’s a Good Idea:” https://www.bloggingbasics101.com/how-to-set-up-a-google-alert-and-why-its-a-good-idea/

RESOURCES

  1. Advisory HQ. “Top Free Press Release Distribution: https://www.advisoryhq.com/articles/top-free-press-release-distribution/
  2. Authors’ Community. “Marketing Your Books:” http://authorscommunity.net/category/marketing-your-books/
  3. Blog: Books on the Knob. “List of free books, coupons for Amazon:” http://blog.booksontheknob.org
  4. Book Enthusiast Promotions. “Release Day Event:” http://www.bookenthusiastpromotions.com/release-day-event/
  5. Bookmarket.com. Reputable Mailing Lists. http://www.bookmarket.com/lists.htm
  6. Brandon Cornett. “54 Tips for Postcard Marketing Success:”
    http://www.bookmarket.com/postcardmarketing.htm
  7. Caitlin Muir. “89 Plus Book Marketing Ideas That Will Change Your Life:” http://www.authormedia.com/89-book-marketing-ideas-that-will-change-your-life/
  8. Carolyn Johnson-Howard. The Frugal Book Promoter: How to get nearly free publicity on your own or partnering with your publisher (The HowToDoItFrugally Series) ebook https://www.amazon.com/Frugal-Book-Promoter-partnering-HowToDoItFrugally-ebook/dp/B005G5L3DC/
  9. Carolyn Johnson-Howard. How to Get Great Book Reviews Frugally and Ethically: The ins and outs of using free reviews to build and sustain a writing career:  https://www.amazon.com/Great-Reviews-Frugally-Ethically-HowToDoItFrugally-ebook/dp/B01MQCKRF5/
  10. Daniel Kehrer. “10 Tips for Postcard Marketing Success:” http://www.bizbest.com/10-tips-for-postcard-marketing-success/
  11. Daniel Newman. “Here Are 12 Must-Use Apps for Marketers:” https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/246047
  12. Danny Iny. “7 Book Marketing Lessons for the Self-Published Author:” https://www.inc.com/danny-iny/7-book-marketing-lessons-for-the-self-published-author.html
  13. David Gaughran. Let’s Get Visible: How To Get Noticed And Sell More Books (Let’s Get Publishing Book 2):  https://www.amazon.com/Lets-Get-Visible-Noticed-Publishing-ebook/dp/B00CPQ6YYI/
  14. Erin Bowman. Publishing Crawl. “How to Support an Author Beyond Buying Their Book:” http://www.publishingcrawl.com/2015/04/20/how-to-support-an-author-after-buying-their-book/
  15. Erin Entrada Kelly, Book Publicist. “YOU DID NANO. NOW WHAT?” http://www.smithpublicity.com/2015/12/you-did-nano-now-what/
  16. Debbie Ridpath Ohi. “Want to support an author’s or illustrator’s new book but can’t afford to buy it?” http://inkygirl.com/inkygirl-main/2015/6/19/want-to-support-an-authors-or-illustrators-new-book-but-cant.html
  17. Derek Haines. “What’s the Best Way to Promote My Self-Published Book:” https://www.justpublishingadvice.com/whats-the-best-way-to-promote-my-self-published-book/
  18. Diana Urban. “119 Book Marketing Ideas That Can Help Authors Increase Sales:” https://insights.bookbub.com/book-marketing-ideas/
  19. D. Jean Quarles. “5 Tips to Writing Your Author Bio:”  http://www.writersonthemove.com/2014/09/5-tips-to-writing-your-authors-bio.html
  20. Enticing Journey Book Promotions. “Release Day Blitz:” http://www.enticingjourneybookpromotions.com/p/release-day-blitz.html
  21. https://www.thebookdesigner.com/2016/08/authors-boost-book-marketing-with-these-5-apps/
  22. https://www.thecreativepenn.com/2010/03/27/marketing-your-first-book-graham-storrs/
  23. Greg Scowen. “A Few Indie Book Reviewers:” http://www.gregscowen.com/a-few-indie-book-reviewers/
  24. HubPages. Search for writing gigs. HubPages. 
  25. Huffington Post. “The Top 10 Things All Authors Should Know About Amazon:” https://www.huffingtonpost.com/brooke-warner/the-top-10-things-all-aut_b_6744386.html
  26. “Indie Authors: 17 Book Marketing Tips to Sell More Books:” https://www.amarketingexpert.com/indie-authors-17-book-marketing-tips-to-sell-more-books/
  27. iuniverse. “10 Tips for Marketing Your Book:” https://www.iuniverse.com/Resources/Book-Marketing-Self-Promotion/10TipsForMarketingYourBook.aspx
  28. J.C. Saucedo. “20 Book Marketing Tips and Tactics for Self-Published Authors:” https://blog.placeit.net/20-book-marketing-tips-tactics-self-publishing-authors/
  29. Jen Malone. Writers’ Rumpus. “Part 1: How to Help an Author (Beyond Buying the Book):” http://writersrumpus.com/2014/01/03/how-to-help-an-author-beyond-buying-the-book-part-one/
  30. Jen Malone. Writers’ Rumpus. “Part 2: How to Help an Author (Beyond Buying the Book):” http://writersrumpus.com/2014/02/07/how-to-help-an-author-beyond-buying-the-book-part-two/
  31. Jen Malone. Writers’ Rumpus. “Part 3: How to Help an Author (Beyond Buying the Book): http://writersrumpus.com/2014/03/07/how-to-help-an-author-beyond-buying-the-book-part-three/
  32. Jessica Knapp. “How to Set Up a Google Alert and Why It’s a Good Idea:” https://www.bloggingbasics101.com/how-to-set-up-a-google-alert-and-why-its-a-good-idea/
  33. Joanna Penn. “How to Create a Book Trailer:” http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2011/01/07/how-to-create-a-book-trailer/
  34. Joanna Penn. How to Market a Book Third Edition: https://www.amazon.com/Market-Book-Third-Joanna-Penn/dp/191210587X
  35. Joan Y. Edwards. (Book Blitz) “Joan’s Elder Care Guide: Empowering You and Your Elder to Survive by Joan Y. Edwards:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2016/05/13/joans-elder-care-guide-empowering-you-and-your-elder-to-survive-by-joan-y-edwards/
  36. Joan Y. Edwards. “New Book? Spread the Word with a Book Blitz:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/new-book-spread-the-word-with-a-book-blitz/
  37. Josh Funk. “How Can You Help an Author?” https://papajfunk.wordpress.com/2015/09/24/how-can-you-help-an-author-im-so-glad-you-asked/
  38. Josh Funk. “How to Buy a Picture Book without Buying a Picture Book:” https://papajfunk.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/how-to-buy-a-picture-book-without-buying-a-picture-book/
  39. Kate Tilton. “Bloggers Resources (contains blogger reviewers):” http://katetilton.com/bloggers/
  40. Kimberley Grabas. “71 Ways to Promote and Market Your Book:” http://www.yourwriterplatform.com/promote-and-market-your-book/
  41. Lori Taylor. “10 Tips for a TweetWorthy Twitter Party:” http://lorirtaylor.com/top-10-tips-for-a-tweetworthy-twitter-party/
  42. Mark Coker.  Smashwords Book Marketing Guide – How to Market Any Book for Free (Smashwords Guides 2)Kindle Edition: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004XR57PE/
  43. Melinda Brasher. “Strategies to Get Book Reviews:” http://www.writersonthemove.com/2014/04/strategies-to-get-book-reviews.html
  44. Monique Danao. “Four Simple Ways Free Lance Writers Can Find Gigs Fast:”  http://writersweekly.com/this-weeks-article/find-new-writing-gigs-fast
  45. National Pen Company. Personalized, colorful, distinctive, smooth writing promotional pens, stylus, magnets: http://www.pens.com
  46. New York Book Editors. “5 Tips for Marketing Your YA Novel:” https://nybookeditors.com/2017/08/5-tips-for-marketing-your-ya-novel/
  47. Nonfiction Author Association. “How to Get Book Reviews – 50 Resources to Generate Book Reviews:” https://nonfictionauthorsassociation.com/how-to-get-book-reviews-50-resources-to-generate-book-reviews/
  48. Pam Perry. “25 Tested Marketing Tips for Self-Published Authors:” http://www.pamperrypr.com/25-tested-marketing-tips-for-self-published-authors/
  49. Press Release Log. https://www.prlog.org/
  50. Publicity Insider. “Special Report: The Ultimate PR & Publicity Secret:” http://www.publicityinsider.com/freesecret.asp
  51. Rachel Abbott. “Reviews: The Good, the Bad, and the Scams:” http://rachelabbottwriter.wordpress.com/2012/03/13/reviews-the-good-the-bad-and-the-scams/#
  52. Richard Ridley. CreateSpace blogger. “Social Media Swap:” https://forums.createspace.com/en/community/community/resources/blog/2015/02/02/social-media-swap
  53. Rob Bignell. 7 Minutes a Day to Promoting Your Book [Kindle Edition]: https://www.amazon.com/Minutes-Day-Promoting-Your-Book-ebook/dp/B00B4XD6FI
  54. Sandra Warren. “Book Trailers Made Easy:” http://sandrawarrenwrites.blogspot.com/2016/01/book-trailers-made-easy.html
  55. Sandra Warren. “Tag Team Marketing – Authors Helping Authors (contains additional marketing information related to book stores, retail stores, and organizations):” http://sandrawarrenwrites.blogspot.com/2016/03/tag-team-marketing-author-helping.html
  56. Sandy Smith Publicity. “101 Book Marketing Ideas to Promote Your Book:” http://www.smithpublicity.com/101-book-marketing-ideas-promote-book/
  57. Scholastic. Charlotte’s Web Teacher’s Guide: “Charlotte’s Web Teacher’s Guide:” https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/unit-plans/teaching-content/charlottes-web-teachers-guide/
  58. Smith Publicity. “How to Hold a Social Media Contest:” http://www.smithpublicity.com/2015/12/how-to-hold-a-social-media-contest/
  59. Tim Grahl. “Book Marketing Plan – The Definitive List:” https://booklaunch.com/book-marketing-checklist/ 
  60. Valerie Peterson. “Book Signings and Book Tours – A Reality Check for Authors:”http://publishing.about.com/od/BookPublicity/fl/Book-Signings-and-Book-Tours-A-Reality-Check-for-Authors.htm
  61. Valerie Peterson. “Part 1 – Getting Your Book into the Bookstore:” http://publishing.about.com/od/BookAuthorBasics/a/How-To-Make-Booksellers-Love-You.htm
  62. Valerie Peterson. “Part 2- Make Booksellers Love You:” http://publishing.about.com/od/BookAuthorBasics/a/Make-Booksellers-Love-You-P2.htm
  63. Valerie Peterson. “Part 3- Getting Your Book Into a Local Bookstore:” http://publishing.about.com/od/BookAuthorBasics/fl/Getting-Your-Book-Into-a-Local-Bookstore.htm
  64. Vistaprint.com. Business cards, post cards, posters, car signs, etc. https://www.vistaprint.com
  65. Writing Career. “Publishers and Magazines Ask for Stories. Help writers get writing gigs:” https://writingcareer.com/
  66. Zairmail.com. Direct Mailing lists, post card templates. http://www.zairmail.com/

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

If you haven’t written a review for me, ask me: How can I get a free copy of your book?

Please check out my books:
Flip Flap Floodle, Will this little duck’s song save him from Mr. Fox?
Joan’s Elder Care Guide published by 4RV Publishing

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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11 Ways to Get Good Reviews for Your Books


How to Get Good Reviews for Your Books Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

“11 Ways to Get Good Reviews for Your Books” by Joan Y. Edwards

This is the third in a series of blog posts about reviews and reviewers. I hope you find it useful.

Due to technical difficulties, my interview with Stephanie Barko will be delayed for a while. Sorry for any inconvenience.

Many times the publisher will get reviews for your books. They may pay someone to do a review of your book. Many resources say authors shouldn’t pay for reviews. It’s up to you. Study and decide for yourself.

Authors will help themselves sell books if they set out to get at least 25 reviews. The more favorable reviews you get, the better your book looks to those who are studying your book’s reviews to help them decide to put down their money to buy online. Even if they plan to buy it in a bookstore, they will probably check the online reviews. Many people who are avid readers belong to Goodreads. Amazon bought Goodreads. Goodreads members are noted for creating a large buzz for books they love. You’ll want reviews on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Goodreads.

Amazon Prime members don’t pay for shipping. Barnes & Noble club members don’t pay for shipping. If people order a book from a Barnes and Noble bookstore in person, usually they don’t charge for shipping.

How can authors find people to do a review for them on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and/or Goodreads? Here are my thoughts after reading the articles in the resources area plus others.

https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2016/07/13/11-ways-to-get-good-reviewers-for-your-book/#Respond

  1. Write a good book.
  2. Tim Grahl says that when you make meaningful relationships with people showing you care about them and they care about you, then they will want to want to buy your book and share it with their family and friends.
  3. Almost all the resources I read tell authors to make online connections: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram. (Choose three for your focus. Ask the followers of your blog, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Google Plus, or other Social Media, “Are you willing to do a review of my book for me? Would you do one for Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Goodreads?”
  4. Ask bloggers that you follow if they’ll do a review on their blog. Many times they’ll also post their review on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and GoodReads.
  5. Tell potential buyers: If you’re willing to do a review for me, I’ll be glad to give you a paperback copy or Ebook copy. I know sometimes life may interfere. When you give someone a review copy, you can’t control whether they actually do the review or not. Be ready to accept that they may do a book review for you, but they may not do a book review for you.
  6. If someone buys a copy, tell them you’ll give them another copy if they write a review for you.
  7. Check Amazon’s top reviewers list. Many reviewers list their email address or website  which may have their contact information. This is tedious to find out which ones do books like yours.
  8. Ask for reviews on the Amazon Forum for Authors http://www.amazon.com/forum/
  9. Ask people in your critique group.
  10. Both Amazon and Goodreads offer ways for you to do Giveaways. With Amazon’s giveaways, you can designate how many people have to respond before Amazon selects a winner or you can designate that the first 5 people to sign up win a copy of your book.  You can make a condition that they do a review or they follow you on Twitter. With Goodreads, you send the autographed copy of the book to the winner. So you can personalize it. With Amazon Giveaways, you pay for the book and the shipping. So the winners do not receive an autographed copy of your book.
  11. When you are giving presentations, ask anyone in the audience who might be interested in doing a review to stop by and see you afterwards.

I’m sure there are many more ways. These are enough to get your started. Brainstorm others. I listed eight resources to help you do a more in-depth study. I put five asterisks by number 8, as I believe it’s the most outstanding of all the ones I listed. I believe you’d enjoy most.

Resources:

  1. Book Promotion Hub “Three Simple Ways to Get More Book Sales from Goodreads:” http://www.bookpromotionhub.com/6199/3-simple-ways-to-get-more-book-sales-from-goodreads-marketing
  2. Empty Mirror Books, “Ten Ways to Find Reviewers for Your Self-Published Book:” http://www.emptymirrorbooks.com/publishing/10-ways-to-find-reviewers-for-your-self-published-book.html
  3. Goodreads. “Author Program-use Goodreads to Promote Yourself and Your Books:” https://www.goodreads.com/author/program
  4. Jodie Renner “Using New Amazon Giveaway to Promote http://jodierennerediting.blogspot.com/2015/03/using-new-amazon-giveaway-to-promote.html
  5. Megan Marrs. “Amazon Reviews:” www.wordstream.com/blog/ws/2014/04/10/amazon-reviews
  6. The Washington Post. “Why Amazon bought GoodReads:” http://www.bookpromotionhub.com/6199/3-simple-ways-to-get-more-book-sales-from-goodreads-marketing/
  7. Tim Grahl. “How to launch your book with at least 25+ Amazon reviews:”  http://timgrahl.com/amazon-reviews/ 
  8. *****Your Writer Platform, “Get Reviews for Your Book:” http://www.yourwriterplatform.com/get-reviews-for-your-book/

Thank you for reading my blog. I appreciate you very much. Let me know your ideas for getting good reviewers for your books. Click below and scroll down to the bottom to tell me your ideas for how an author can get someone to write a review for a book.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

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First Lines from Non-Fiction Best Sellers


“First Lines from Non-Fiction Best Sellers” by Joan Y. Edwards

Wow! I did a bunch of research to help me put in my mind what the Non-Fiction Best Sellers Authors wrote for the first lines of the text and the first sentence of their pitch summary (as described in the Book Descriptions on Amazon.com). I thought it would impress upon myself and other writers the importance of that elevator pitch in selling a non-fiction book. Some of the books on Amazon didn’t let you look inside. I noted those cases for you. I only wrote the first sentence of the book description.

Some books had an introduction chapter. I didn’t know whether to count that as the first page, or the next chapter as the first page. In these cases, I put the first sentence for the introduction and the next chapter, too.

Some of these are children’s books; most are adult books. All of the books were listed on the New York Best Seller List for Non-Fiction or the Amazon list of Best Sellers for Non-Fiction.

I put the total number of words that were in the book description. I also put the number of words in the first sentence of the book description. If you would like to read the whole pitch, click on the link for the book. It’ll take you to Amazon. I make no money from these links. I put it for your convenience. Amazon, authors, and publishers will appreciate any purchases.

1. Project Management Professional (PMP) Exam Prep Seventh Edition: Rita’s Course in a Book for Passing the PMP Exam by Rita Mulcahy

First Sentence of text is unavailable on Amazon.

Book Description: 171 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 17 words
“Can you imagine valuing a book so much that you send the author a Thank You letter?”

 

2. Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons by Siegfried Engelmann, Phyllis Haddox, Elaine Bruner

First Sentence of text is unavailable on Amazon.

Book Description: 237 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 12 words
“Is your child halfway through first grade and still unable to read?”

 

3. Separation of Church & State: What the Founders Meant by David Barton

First Sentence of text is unavailable on Amazon.

Book Description: 89 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 22 words
This new book is very timely for one of the most frequently debated issues in America: the separation of church and state.”

 

4. The Daily Five by Gail Boushey, Joan Moser

First Sentence of text, Chapter One, Introduction:
“The typical teacher has children doing a lot of  ‘stuff.’”

First Sentence of text, Chapter Two:
“What beliefs influence the decisions you make in your classroom?”

Book Description: 200 words

First Sentence of Book Description:
“Do you love teaching but feel exhausted from the energy you expend cajoling, disciplining, and directing students on a daily basis?”

5. Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power by Rachel Maddow

First Sentence of Text:
“Thomas Jefferson was a lifelong and habitual fretter.”

Book Description: 235 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 17 words
“‘One of my favorite ideas is, never to keep an unnecessary soldier,’ Thomas Jefferson wrote in 1792.”

6. Teach Like a Champion: 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College by Doug Lemov, Norman Atkins

First Sentence of Text, Introduction:
“Great teaching is an art.”

First Sentence of Text, Chapter One:
“One consistent finding of academic research is that high expectations are the most reliable driver of high student achievement, even in students who do not have a history of successful achievement.”

Book Description: 179 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 23 words
Teach Like a Champion offers effective teaching techniques to help teachers, especially those in their first few years, become champions in the classroom.

 

7. The CAFE Book: Engaging All Students in Daily Literary Assessment and Instruction by Gail Boushey, Joan Moser

First Sentence, Chapter 1, Introduction:
“A confession: even though this is a research-based guide and system, we didn’t create it while we were in school.”

First Sentence, Chapter 2:
“We have tried as many different methods for keeping anecdotal notes as we have had shoes in our closets.”

Book Description: 267 words

First Sentence of Book Description:
“All readers of any age need instruction and support that helps them become more independent and self-reflective in their work.” – Gail Boushey and Joan Moser

8. Original Intent: The Courts, the Constitution, & Religion by David Barton

First Sentence of text is unavailable on Amazon.

Book Description: 67 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 21 words
“An essential resource for anyone interested in our nation’s religious heritage and the Founders’ intended role for the American judicial system.”

 

9. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals by Michael Pollan

First Sentence of Text:
“Air-conditioned, odorless, illuminated by buzzing fluorescent tubes, the American market doesn’t present itself as having very much to do with Nature.”

Book Description: 99 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 33 words
“A national bestseller that has changed the way readers view the ecology of eating, this revolutionary book by award winner Michael Pollan asks the seemingly simple question: What should we have for dinner?”

 

10. The Road to Serfdom: Text and Documents–The Definitive Edition (The Collected Works of F. A. Hayek, Volume 2) by F. A. Hayek, Bruce Caldwell

First Sentence of Text, Introduction:
“Contemporary events differ from history in that we do not know the results they will produce.”

Book Description: 319 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 30 words
“An unimpeachable classic work in political philosophy, intellectual and cultural history, and economics, The Road to Serfdom has inspired and infuriated politicians, scholars, and general readers for half a century.”

11. Heaven for Kids by Randy Alcorn and Linda Washington

First Sentence of Text:
“Is Heaven a real place?”

Book Description: 146 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 19 words
“In a language kids can understand, Randy Alcorn explores Biblical answers to the questions kids often have about heaven.”

12. The Boy’s Body Book: Everything You Need to Know for Growing Up YOU (Boys World Books) by Kelli Dunham and Steven Bjorkman

First Sentence of Text:
“It seems like it could be nature’s joke that just when boys’ sweat glands begin to work overtime, boys often develop what looks like an allergy to bathing.”

Book Description: 142 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 13 words
“As boys reach adolescence, everything changes: their bodies, their feelings, and their relationships.”

13. Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo with Lynn Vincent

First Sentence of Text:
“The family trip when our nightmare began was supposed to be a celebration.”

Book Description: 177 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 15 words
“A young boy emerges from life-saving surgery with remarkable stories of his visit to heaven.”

14. Bossy Pants by Tina Fey

First Sentence of Text:
“My brother is eight years older than I am.”

Book Description: 158 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 37 words
“Before Liz Lemon, before “Weekend Update,” before “Sarah Palin,” Tina Fey was just a young girl with a dream: a recurring stress dream that she was being chased through a local airport by her middle-school gym teacher.”

15. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

First Sentence of Text:
“When people as—and seems like people always be akin to where I can’t never get away from it–I say, Yeah, that’s right, my mother names was Henrietta Lacks, she died in 1951, John Hopkins took her cells and them cells are still livin today, still multiplyin, still gorwin and spreadin if you don’t keep em frozen.”

Book Description: 436 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 11 words
“Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa.”

16. The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

First Sentence of Text:
“In the fall of 1993, a man who would upend much of what we know about habits walked into a laboratory in San Diego for a scheduled appointment.”

 Book Description: 412 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 7 words
“A young woman walks into a laboratory.”

17. Outliers:The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

First Sentence of Text:
“One warm spring day in May of 2007, the Medicine Hat Tigers and the Vancouver Giants met for the Memorial Cup hockey championships in Vancouver, British Columbia.”

Book Description: 125 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 30 words
“In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of “outliers”–the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful.”

 

18. Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer

First Sentence of Text:
“Bob Dylan looks bored.”

Book Description: 247 words
“Did you know that the most creative companies have centralized bathrooms?”

19. Mrs. Kennedy and Me by Clint Hill

First Sentence of Text:
“It was with great trepidation that I approached 3307 N Street in Georgetown on November 11, 1960.”

Book Description: 337 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 10 words
“He called her Mrs. Kennedy. She called him Mr. Hill.”

20. The LEGO® Ideas Book by Daniel Lipkowitz

First Sentence of Text, Introduction:
“Building with LEGO® bricks is huge fun and endlessly creative.”

First Sentence of Text, Brick Tips:
“Every LEGO® builder has his or her own way of doing things, but here are some useful tips to get you started.”

Book Description: 166 words

First Sentence of Book Description:
You have what it takes! Did you ever wonder what you can do with all of those LEGO® bricks after you have created the project they came with?”

21. The Planets in Our Solar System by Franklyn M. Branley (Author), Kevin O’Malley (Illustrator)

First Sentence of Text:
“We all live on a planet.”

Book Description: 158 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 12 words
“You live on Earth, so you already know a lot about it.”

22. The Big Book of Girl Stuff by Bart King, illustrated by Jennifer Kalis

First Sentence of Text:
“Babysitting is Fantastic!”

Book Description: 152 words

First Sentence of Book Description: 27 words
“The Big Book of Girl Stuff shares everything a girl needs to know—from sleepovers to diaries to makeup to boys to shopping, and everything in between.”

I hope you enjoyed studying these first sentences. Perhaps they will lead you to create a great first sentence for the text of your non-fiction book or for a pitch that will intrigue readers from all over the world.

Please list your favorite non-fiction book and the first sentence of text and/or the first sentence of its pitch.

Updated September 24, 2017

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Please check out my books:
Flip Flap Floodle, Will this little duck’s song save him from Mr. Fox?
Joan’s Elder Care Guide published by 4RV Publishing

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

 


You Have the Luck of the Irish – Submit a Manuscript Today (PubSub3rdFri)


Dear Pub Subbers,
It’s the luck of the Irish. Submit a manuscript on the third Friday of March or any month. If you’re not Irish, it’s still a lucky fun-filled day for you. Get that creative work ready and send it off the next third Friday that rolls around. Submit regularly and often to raise your chances of being published.

I’d like to share a little personal history of my submissions. In 2009, before I started PubSub3rdFri, I submitted four times. All four had negative responses of “NO.”
In 2010 after I started PubSub3rd Fri, I submitted 30 times.
As a result of pitching to an agent and 2 editors at online/in-person interviews, I got three “YES, I want to see your manuscript” responses, followed by two “NO, Your manuscript does not meet our needs.” However, one publishing company editor responded in 2011 that they are tentatively interested in publishing “Joan’s Elder Care Guide.” That is one “MAYBE.” This is farther than I’d gotten previously.
As a result of a query to Working Writer Newsletter for an article about PubSub3rdFri, I received a “YES.”
Out of the 30 submissions, 4 answers were “YES.” Four out of 30 equals 13% Yes. That is really an improvement.
87% said, “NO.” However, I’m going to focus on the 13% Yes.

Do I have a book accepted by a publishing company yet? No. Does submitting more often improve your chances of getting a “YES?” I think so. Has my writing and my understanding of the getting published process improved? Yes. Am I getting closer? Yes, I believe I am. My belief is half the battle.

I truly want each of us to get published. In inspiring you, I find encouragement for myself.

I’m making a list of people who submitted work because of PubSub3rdFri during 2010. If you submitted and want to be listed on the  Pub Subbers 2010 list, please email me at the address listed in the left-hand column with your name and blog/website. Tell me at least one title, place you submitted to, date submitted, and whether it was by email or snail mail. Tell me your name and blog/website.  If you don’t have a blog/website, I’ll just list your name. I’ll choose a Pub Subber 2010 member at random to win a free critique  on April 1, 2011 at noon EST.

For all of you who participate in PubSub3rdFri during 2011, I’d like to list your name and a link to your website/blog on a Pub Subbers 2011 page on this blog. If you don’t have a blog or website, I’ll list your name by itself.

To be eligible to win a free critique during March
1. Submit a manuscript for a picture book, chapter book, middle grade, young adult novel, adult novel, play, movie, song, puzzle, article, illustration, query, proposal to a publisher, editor, agent, or contest.
2. Make a comment below with the following information:
Title of Project
Name of Contest, Publisher, Editor, Agent
Date you submitted
Email or Snail Mail
Your Name
Link to Your Personal Website or Blog
3. Your name will be put in a drawing to receive a FREE CRITIQUE by me. The winner will be announced on April 1, 2011 at 12:00 noon EST.
4. Your name and your personal blog/website will be listed on a Pub Subbers 2011 page on my blog. If you don’t have a blog or website, I’ll list your name by itself.

I hope you’ll join us in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year. Of course, you can submit your work to more than one publisher or agent a month.

Honor your dreams by submitting a manuscript this month. It’ll get you started. If you do it at least three months in a row, I believe you’ll be creating a life-long habit. It’ll start your ball rolling to knock down all the publication pins in your alley.

Believe in yourself. Your belief will spread to others who will believe in you, too. All of your experiences will lead you to be a stronger person, wiser, skilled, and energetic. Your belief is half your battle. I know for sure that publishers do not come searching the drawers or computers where your manuscripts or other creative works are hidden in your home. You have to let them know about your creative treasures. Take action. Submit to publishers and/or agents. Celebrate each step on your path to publication!

Here are steps for each week to get you ready to submit your work to a publisher or agent: say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

Get your manuscript, and use the resources below to accomplish your Pub Sub 3rd Fri goal:

Steps for Week One Smile, Giggle, Laugh . See the humor.
1. Read this book or a similar one, or search online publisher/agent websites for current guidelines.

Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman

http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

2. Choose three publishers/agents to submit a manuscript/query letter/illustration.

a. Read the guidelines of all three publishers/agents.

b. Select the publisher/agent to use this month.

c. Print out a copy of the publisher’s guidelines and save it in your submissions folder.

3. Fine tune your manuscript.

a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

d. Here are fourteen books that may help you with your writing skills. They are listed in alphabetical order according to author’s first name. If you click on the title, it’ll take you to Amazon.com. Check out the book from your local library for free or buy it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for beginning and improving your story. Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

1. Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis
2. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction
3. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel
4. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook
5. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel
6. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II
7. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Mystery
8. James N. Frey The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth
9. Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact
10. Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories
11. Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages
12. Jordan E. Rosenfeld: Make a Scene
13. Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch
14. Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri Smile, Giggle, Laugh .

1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter, then write your query letter.

3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor. Refer to my blog for more information about writing your pitch: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/how-to-entice-an-editoragent-with-a-pitch-logline.

b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On (date 3 months from your submission) I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

4. Write your resume.

a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

c. Include all of your publishing credits.

5. If needed, write your proposal.

Steps for Week Three Smile, Giggle, Laugh:

1. Read out loud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

3. If you see errors, correct them.

4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

11. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

Pub Sub 3rd Friday Laugh, Smile, Laugh
12. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

13. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

Dance! Sing! Celebrate Your Submission!

Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on the third Friday of this month, go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog posts for more information: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri.

To those of you who are reading this. Thank you. I am honored. Good luck in publishing your work. For more encouragement to submit your work, read Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works. Let me know if Pub Sub 3rd Fri helps you get published. I’d love to hear from you. Feel free to share a link to my blog with others.

1. Sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block at the top of the left hand column. 2. If you want to be listed on the Pub Subbers 2012 list, email me at the address listed in the left-hand column with your name and blog/website. If you don’t have a blog/website, I’ll just list your name.

Never Give Up!
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2011 Joan Y. Edwards and her licensors.

Help Celebrate PubSub3rdFri’s First Birthday – Submit on Friday, February 18, 2011


PubSub3rdFri Participant

Dear Pub Subbers,

Happy Birthday, PubSub3rdFri! Happy Birthday to you! Happy Birthday to you. Happy Birthday, Pub Sub, Happy Birthday to you.
The first official Pub Sub day was February 15, 2010. We’re going to have a great celebration on Friday, February 18, 2011.  As a Valentine’s Day present to yourself, I would like for you to join me in submitting a query, manuscript, or proposal on that day (or any day during February).  You can count it as a submission if you enter a writing contest or an illustrator contest. If you submit your work during February, read the directions at the end of this blog post to have a chance to receive a FREE CRITIQUE by me.

I hope you’ll join us in Pub Sub 3rd Fri. Our goal commitment is to submit an article, poem, puzzle, devotion, illustration, short story, picture book, chapter book, middle grade novel, young adult novel, adult novel, play, song, or movie to a publisher on the third Friday of each month for a whole year. Of course, you can submit your work to more than one publisher a month. Yes, indeed, you can submit to more than one agent a month. Honoring your dreams by submitting a manuscript this month is only to get you started. I hope that once you get started, you’ll be submitting as a habit. I hope that your belief in yourself will grow and branch out to all aspects of your life and will indeed help you reach your goal of getting published. I know for sure that publishers do not come searching the drawers where your manuscripts are hidden in your home. You have to let them know about your writing treasures. Take action. Submit to publishers and/or agents.

It is very important in life to take time to do what is important to you.  By honoring yourself by working on your writing, you are being a good example to your family that each person should take time to do what is vitally important to them.  Be creative. You can do it. You can find 15 minutes for you each day.  There are different parts to writing:  1. Experience life and watch people. 2. Read. 3. Write down ideas that intrigue you. 4. Write about the ideas that won’t let you go…the what ifs. Drop the excuses. It’s just as easy to say the words, “I have the time,” as it is to say, “I don’t have the time.” One empowers you and the other stops you in your tracks. So you don’t do it every month, but you do it more than you ever have in the past. Hurray for you! Celebrate! Even if it’s with a cup of coffee. Celebrate your submissions. Celebrate you…there’s only one of you.

Here are steps for each week to get you ready to submit your work to a publisher or agent: say, “I can do it.” Let me hear you shout, “Yes, yes. I can do it. I have the power to do it. I CAN DO IT.”

Besides a manuscript or article, below are the resources you need to accomplish your Pub Sub 3rd Fri goal:

Steps for Week One Smile, Giggle, Laugh . See the humor.
1. Read this book or a similar one, or search online publisher/agent websites for current guidelines.

Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over! by Jeff Herman

http://www.amazon.com/Hermans-Publishers-Editors-Literary-Agents/dp/1402243375/

2 Choose three publishers/agents to submit a manuscript/query letter/illustration.

a. Read the guidelines of all three publishers/agents.

b. Select the publisher/agent to use this month.

c. Print out a copy of the publisher’s guidelines and save it in your submissions folder.

3. Fine tune your manuscript.

a. Use spell and grammar check with your manuscript.

b. Look for four errors in your manuscript. Read my blog for common errors you might miss unless you search for them: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/look-for-four-writing-errors-when-you-revise/

c. If you’ve been to a writing conference, revise three places in your manuscript using a skill or technique taught that you think will improve it.

d. Here are fourteen books that may help you with your writing skills. They are listed in alphabetical order according to author’s first name. If you click on the title, it’ll take you to Amazon.com. Check out the book from your local library for free or buy it at a book store (local or online). I’ve read all of these books. They each contain excellent advice and tips for beginning and improving your story. Little by little the information and skills soak into your mind. Your skills and knowledge improve. You’ll be able to tell when you’re critiquing someone’s work or reading your favorite book. You’ll say to yourself, “AHA. That’s how to do it.” Your writing gets better. Your critiquing improves. You move one step closer to publication. Even published writers continue to learn more about the craft of writing by reading.

1. Darcy Pattison: Novel Metamorphosis

2. Donald Maass: The Fire in Fiction

3. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel

4. Donald Maass: Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook

5. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel

6. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II

7. James N. Frey How to Write a Damn Good Mystery

8. James N. Frey The Key: How to Write Damn Good Fiction Using the Power of Myth

9. Karl Iglesias: Writing for Emotional Impact

10. Margaret Lucke: Schaum’s Quick Guide to Writing Great Short Stories

11. Noah Lukeman: The First Five Pages

12. Jordan E. Rosenfeld: Make a Scene

13. Katharine Sands: Making the Perfect Pitch

14. Remni Browne and Dave King: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Week Two Steps for Pub Sub 3rd Fri Smile, Giggle, Laugh .

1. Let your manuscript sit a week in an incubator while you do your query or cover letter, resume, and proposal.

2. If the guidelines say to write a query letter, then write your query letter.

3. If you’re submitting a manuscript or article, write a cover letter to accompany it.

a. Include a strong pitch for your manuscript in your cover letter. A pitch is a 25 word eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article to hook the attention of the reader, agent, and/or editor. Refer to my blog for more information about writing your pitch: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/how-to-entice-an-editoragent-with-a-pitch-logline.

b. In your cover letter, mention one book, article, or illustration similar to yours and how yours hooks readers and attracts them to it. Each time you write a cover letter, you will improve.

c. If you’re a member of SCBWI, mention that fact in your cover letter. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.

d. If this is an exclusive submission, write that in your cover letter. “This is an exclusive submission for three months. On (date 3 months from your submission) I am submitting it to other publishers.” For exclusive submission with an agent, you can limit the time to two months or six weeks. Their guidelines might give you an idea of how much time they usually take. I think giving them a time, keeps you from wondering and gives them reason to respect your choice.

4. Write your resume.

a. Include your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, blog.

b. List all memberships in professional organizations.

c. Include all of your publishing credits.

5. If needed, write your proposal.

Steps for Week Three Smile, Giggle, Laugh:

1. Read out loud a printed out (hard copy) of your manuscript. Make all necessary changes.

2. Print out your manuscript again. Read it aloud, again. Then read it from the bottom to the top, and from right to left. This will help you notice more errors that your might not notice in other ways.

3. If you see errors, correct them.

4. Print out the GO FOR IT copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal.

5. Put one copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in 9×12 envelope

6. Print out and save another copy of manuscript, cover letter, resume, and/or proposal in a folder called “Submitted Manuscripts.”

7. Make sure you put your snail mail address, phone number, email address, website, and blog on your cover letter, proposal, query, and/or manuscript. If it’s an email submission, follow the publisher/editor/agent guidelines about attachments. Many publishers do not accept attachments. Follow their guidelines.

8. Print out label for 9×12 inch envelope – use the mailing address in publisher’s guidelines. If it is an exclusive submission, mark it as such on the outside of the envelope.

9. Enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope, if the guidelines ask for one.

10. Put sufficient postage on the envelope.

11. Leave the envelope with all the items inside over night (24 hours is good).

Pub Sub 3rd Friday Laugh, Smile, Laugh
12. Check your manuscript, cover letter, proposal, and resume Friday morning.

13. Put addressed, stamped envelope with your PUB SUB in a mailbox or email. Say a prayer. Ask God to bless this submission. Say to yourself: I allow myself to receive a positive response, such as, “Yes, I’d like to publish this manuscript.”

Each time you submit, you will get better and better. In case you’re not ready on the third Friday of this month, go to my website and print out a rain check: http://www.joanyedwards.com/pubsub3rdfri.htm.

See my other Pub Sub 3rd Fri blog posts for more information: https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/category/writing/pub-sub-3rd-fri.

To those of you who are reading this. Thank you. I am honored. Good luck in publishing your work.  For more encouragement to submit your work, read Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works. Let me know if Pub Sub 3rd Fri helps you get published. I’d love to hear from you. Feel free to share a link to my blog with others.

Never Give Up!
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2011 Joan Y. Edwards.

 

My Interview of Jeff Herman


Interview of Jeff Herman, Author of Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011.

About Jeff Herman’s Agency: http://www.jeffherman.com/about-the-agency/jeff-herman/

Welcome, Jeff Herman.  Thank you for participating in an interview for my blog. I am honored because I am impressed with your book and by the active steps you take every day to help writers achieve their publication dreams.

Welcome, Readers. Thank you for visiting my blog and reading my interview with Jeff Herman.

Below you will find my ten questions I asked and Jeff’s answers to them. I hope by reading them you will become further convinced that his book, “Jeff Herman’s Guide to Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents” contains useful information that could get you published. I hope that you will be encouraged so much that you will never give up. I hope that we inspire you to take the next step toward your goal.

  1. Who and/or what circumstances helped fill you with the most confidence? How do you keep positive-minded? For me, confidence can be a zig-zagging process, though my bottom-line confidence level seems to progressively improve with experience and maturity. I have learned that the lack of confidence is the most common reason for not trying to do something, but that confidence without knowledge and leverage can be useless. I try to avoid reasons why something won’t happen while focusing on strategies to make it happen. Success builds confidence, but that can also be a trap because new situations may require new methods, and it takes discipline to avoid complacency.
  2. What are three of your favorite books? Why? Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, because they helped make me a reader. Bonfire of the Vanities, because I still think about it 20 years after reading it.
  3. What inspired you to write the “Jeff Herman’s Guide to Publishers, Editors, & Literary Agents?” I needed to collect the information anyway for my own purposes, so I figured why not package it for sale. When I started out as a young agent it struck me how many aspiring writers were clueless about how to get published, and I personally resented that so many editors wanted to be invisible and inaccessible. I believed, and still do, that opening the gates is what’s best for everyone. Publishing is like a public utility and no one should be prevented from being given a fair shot.
  4. This is the 21st edition of your book. It explains the differences and changes in the mega-publishers, independent publishers, and university presses. The symbols you use for the different genres are very helpful: Romance-heart, Children-school bus, Religious-Cross, etc. In your next edition, are you planning to add symbols to agents pages? Is there any chance you might add a symbol for publishers who accept email submissions or accept unsolicited manuscripts? I like the symbols and think they should be expanded, but I must confess that they were entirely my publisher’s idea.
  5. Why do most mega-publishers and many independent publishers only accept work through an agent? How does an agent help a publisher? What is an agent’s job with a writer? In fairness, editors need to shield themselves from being overwhelmed by unsolicited submissions; there just isn’t enough time or staff to review the vast majority of them. The agent is crucial because she is the screener, and is unlikely to present anything to publishers that’s mis-directed or unworthy. When projects arrive from credible agents, editors figure it’s not a waste of time to take a look. It follows that a writer’s most effective route to getting access to a bona fide editor is to be represented by a bona fide agent.
  6. Your book lists the history of hundreds of literary agents, what they are looking for, and how to contact them. As an agent, you represent clients who write adult non-fiction. What steps can writers take to become your client today? How do you know when a writer is the perfect client for you? How many possible publishers do you have to see flashing across your mind before you sign a new client?  Good questions can be hard to answer. I know it when I see it, and sometimes I don’t know it when I see it. Agents and editors are right and wrong all the time, which is why writers must never throw in the towel. I simply need to intuitively feel that I can sell the project somewhere. Without that feeling, I’m not the right agent, but it still may be a darn good project.
  7. What’s your advice for writers who want to become published? know that no one owes you anything, but that it’s ok to ask for everything, though you shouldn’t expect to get everything. Giving up is failure. Rejection is eventually followed by success a lot of the time. Love the writing and tolerate the publishing.
  8. What mistakes do writers make in their query letters and/or proposals? What can they do to correct them? Poor expression. Boring. Unclear concepts and thoughts. Self-defacing. Resentful and negative. Too many words. Overly derivative and unoriginal. Just avoid these characteristics and you will be above-average.
  9. Self-Publishing has a better reputation than it did six years ago. What are the advantages and disadvantages of self-publishing today? Self-publishers don’t get distribution; have to pay for everything themselves, and lack brand credibility that comes with having a bona fide publisher. However, they manifest the product and could potentially sell a lot of copies for a lot of money in a lot of ways that don’t require bookstore support.
  10. The iPad, the Kindle, Sony and similar electronic readers have opened an exciting new way of viewing books, magazines, and newspapers. Children’s picture book applications for iPad and iPhones are animated and fun for both adults and children. Digital magazines are becoming interactive with statistics that updates as you read it on the internet. This is indeed a fascinating medium for distributing and viewing written material. What advantages and disadvantages with electronic publishing do you see emerging for publishers and writers? How would a good contract stipulate electronic rights? Compare the cost/selling price/profit for hardbacks, paperbacks, eBooks, and eBook applications for iPads and iPhones. Digital formatting will dominate market share in the near future, and will further enable self-publishing. The jury is still out for how this will financially affect typical writers, though my hunch is that it will be positive by generating more revenues in general. Borders will soon be a memory. Barnes & Noble will be forced to reengineer what it does by selling a lot of non-book products, while the independents will manage to find sustainable niches same as they do now. Amazon knew 10 years ago that they will have to sell almost everything and be a commissioned broker for third-parties, and their model is working out. Corporate owned publishers missed the boat by failing to invent their own ereaders. They will continue to be exploited and disrespected by their owners, meaning even less diverse and more bland vanilla front lists. Boutique houses will make a come-back and will profitably publish great books.

Thanks again, Jeff for taking the time to answer my questions to keep writers informed and help me and other writers get published.  Do something good for yourself today.

My humble thanks to Beth Pehlke, Jeff Herman’s publicist for inviting me to interview him and review his book on my blog and for donating three free copies of his book for the contests below. I am very honored that she chose me.

Thank you for reading my blog.

To enter a contest to win a free copy of a book, follow the directions below:

1. Sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column. The 50th person to subscribe by email from the left will receive a free paperback copy of Flip Flap Floodle or a 1001 Ways to Market Your Books by John Kremer.

2. I will enter all email subscribers at midnight (EST) on January 18, 2011 into a random drawing to win a free copy of Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011. Sign up for an email subscription from the “Sign me up” block from the top of the left hand column.

3. I will enter everyone who leaves a comment on this post by midnight (EST) Tuesday, January 18, 2011 into a random drawing to win a free copy of Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011.

4. I will enter each person who leaves a comment on my Review of Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011 blog post by midnight (EST) Tuesday, January 18, 2011 into a random drawing to win a free copy of Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2011.

5. Read Roxie’s Blog interview with me http://wp.me/pBU4R-BG, then leave a comment on my blog post https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2011/01/05/roxie-put-me-in-the-spotlight-on-her-blog/ by noon (EST) on Monday, February 14, 2011, you’ll be entered into a random drawing to win a free copy of Flip Flap Floodle.

I’d love to hear from you. Feel free to share a link to my blog with others. Use email, Facebook, Twitter, or other means to share.

Never Give Up

Joan Y. Edwards

http://www.joanyedwards.com

http://www.joanyedwards.wordpress.com

http://www.joanseldercareguide.weebly.com

Copyright 2011 Joan Y. Edwards. All rights reserved.

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