Write Your Pitch, First


Write Your Pitch, First Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Write Your Pitch, First Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“Write Your Pitch, First” by Joan Y. Edwards

For many years I didn’t know what a pitch was except by a person throwing a baseball. Then after I joined the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, they had sessions to explain a pitch to me. I was as clueless at the end of the session as I was at the beginning.

When I went to a writer’s workshop in Oceanside, Oregon in 2010, I learned how to write a pitch for a story: I had many stories written with no pitch – no logline – no plot.

The reason why it’s a good idea to write the pitch first is to make sure your plot works. To make sure that it is logical and would probably happen as a natural consequence.

  1. When discussing your pitch with an editor or agent tell your name, genre, and number of words in your manuscript.
  2. Write your pitch on a 3×5″ card. If you can’t get it all written on the front side of the card, it’s too long.

The pitch is the structure of a story in a nutshell. If you can’t figure out a pitch for your story, it’s entirely possible that the action your main character takes is not related to the real problem that keeps him from achieving his goal. Let me explain.

WHO? A pitch tells you an adjective and the main character to answer the question who? a sixteen year old girl; a five-year-old boy; an anxious daughter; an obnoxious son, an honest clerk, or a feeble man.

WHERE? A pitch tells or hints at the location (the setting): beach, high school, desert, bedroom, top of skyscraper, city, small town

WHEN? (Especially, if it’s historical fiction)

Main Character WANTS WHAT? A pitch tells you what the main character wants more than anything else in the world. He is  willing to take death-defying action and change to get it. He will not stop until he gets it. Getting it is an obsession with him. He wants a skill, a prize, a friend. He wants to defeat an enemy. He wants to stop someone from doing something. He wants to get someone to do something.

WHY? Why does this matter so much to the character? Why should we care?

WHAT STOPS HIM? A pitch tells the lowest point of the story from which readers doubt that anyone, especially this character with these flaws, can succeed.

WHAT’S HE WILLING TO DO? HOW IS HE WILLING TO CHANGE IN ORDER TO GET IT? WHAT IS HIS INNER AND OUTER STRUGGLE?

  1. WHAT ACTION DOES HE TAKE THAT HE FIRMLY BELIEVES IS GOING TO HELP HIM, but alas and alack, it puts him farther from his goal.
  2. Again he believes the second action will help him and it puts him even more at a disadvantage.
  3. He tries even a third time and gets to the point that he almost gives up.

UNTIL HE HAS AN AHA MOMENT AND FIGURES OUT THE IDEA AND ACTION THAT TAKES HIM ACROSS THE GOAL LINE OF SUCCESS

Here are three loglines:

  • Can clumsy Jill win beauty queen of her high school in spite of the fact that she dyes her hair purple, tripped their football team’s quarterback, and  spills red punch on the principal’s white suit?
  • Jason wants more than anything to be a pilot for Avery Aviation but his father won’t hire anyone in the family as a pilot.
  • Title: Tasteless Writer -Adam Conway- Genre: Comedy
    Logline: A world renowned taste tester/food critic loses his sense of taste and struggles to discover who he is once his one defining characteristic is gone. http://scriptshadow.blogspot.com/2009/11/top-100-loglines-for-scriptshadow.html

I hope that this blog helps you have a better idea of how and why you should write a pitch before you write the story. It will help you make sure everything is inter-related and all points lead to the main character getting what he wants or being defeated.

Here are 9 more of my blog posts about a pitch. They might help you get a grip on writing a better pitch.

  1. How to Write a Pitch, Summary, and Synopsis That Sells
  2. A Selling Pitch Is Short with a Strong Emotional Tug
  3. Which of These Best-Selling Romance Pitches Is the Best? Why?
  4. Pitch Exercise #2 Romance – Would You Accept or Reject These Pitches?
  5. Results of Pitch Exercise #1 – Which Pitches Did 12 Responders Accept?
  6. How to Write an Effective Selling Pitch for a Romance Novel
  7. How to Deliver a Short Gutsy Pitch to Entice Editors, Agents, and Readers
  8. Week Two: Writing the Pitch, Query Letter, Proposal, Resume (Pub Subbers)
  9. How to Entice an Editor/Agent with a Pitch (Logline)

Here are my blog posts about plot:

  1. 7 Questions to Make Sure Your Plot Has Believable Consequences
  2. 7 Ways to Add Surprise to Create a Best Seller That Readers Crave
  3. Does Your Main Character Fall into the Bottom of a Deep Pit of Trouble?
  4. Eight Character Archetypes to Emphasize the Conflict in Your Story
  5. Joan’s Manuscript Quality Control Test
  6. Put Dilemmas in Your Stories for a Compelling Punch
  7. Put Universal Conflict, Theme, and Emotions in Your Story
  8. Show the Inner and Outer Conflicts of Your Characters
  9. What? I Need a Plot?

6 Other Writers’ Posts about Pitch

  1. 7 Reasons to Create a One-Page Pitch Before You Plan …
  2. Eight Steps to a Powerful Pitch
  3. How to Write a Pitch and Get Noticed | Successful Blogging
  4. How Writing Concept First Will Help Your Script & Pitch
  5. Plotting Your Picture Book by Writing Your Pitch First…
  6. Write a Novel Pitch

Please let me know what techniques and guides you use to write your pitch.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015

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Today Is Linda Andersen’s Birthday


Linda Andersen Copyright © 2013 Linda Andersen

Linda Andersen
Copyright © 2013 Linda Andersen

Today is Linda Andersen’s birthday.

She is fun, creative and a pure delight.

She is supportive of her husband, family, and friends.

She is a joy to know.

Happy Birthday, Linda Martin Andersen.

 

Please read one of her blog posts and leave a comment to wish her a Happy Birthday!

 

 

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015

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20 Resources for Illustrators


20 Resources for Illustrators Copyright 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

20 Resources for Illustrators Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“20 Resources for Illustrators” by Joan Y. Edwards

I’ve been working on my illustrations for Larry, the Terrifying Turkey under contract with Ravenswood Publishing. I found a few blogs, websites, and YouTube links that might help inspire you as an illustrator and help you improve your skills. Please share with me in the comments area  links that help you in your illustrating journey.

  1. Caldecott Award – http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/caldecottmedal/caldecottmedal
  2. Creative Blog. “9 Top Illustrator Resources.” http://www.creativebloq.com/illustrator/resources-113968
  3. Diane Cricket Phillips. “The Difference Between Illustration and Art – Cricket Diane C Phillips – Cricket House Studios – 2008:” https://cricketdiane.wordpress.com/2008/02/20/the-difference-between-illustration-and-art-cricket-diane-c-phillips-cricket-house-studios-2008/
  4. Harold Underdown. “Picture Book Manuscripts and Illustrations:” http://www.underdown.org/picture-books-illustrations.htm
  5. Jodie Rodriguez. “Exploring Illustrating Techniques in Picture Books:” http://growingbookbybook.com/2013/08/10/exploring-illustrating-techniques-in-picture-books-10-for-10/
  6. Julie Danielson. “10 Children’s Illustrators to Watch:” http://bookpage.com/the-book-case/17011-10-childrens-illustrators-to-watch#.VUbdCPlVhBc
  7. Lynne Chapman. “An Illustrator’s Life for Me:” http://lynnechapman.blogspot.com/
  8. Nate Williams. “How to Start Your Illustrator Career http://www.n8w.com/wp/552
  9. Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. “Frequently Asked Questions:” http://www.scbwi.org/frequently-asked-questions/
  10. Society of Illustrators – Awards and Contests http://www.societyillustrators.org/Awards.aspx?id=112

YouTube videos to help illustrators

  1. Jazza. “How to Create Characters (the Design Process):” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rpj2J4tn4YI
  2. Leonardo Pereznieto. “5 Tips to Be a Successful Artist! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fefYsWHHc0I
  3. Lynne Chapman. “How to Illustrate a Picture Book: Creating the Drawings:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5DQXg86luA
  4. Mark Crilley. “Creating Characters – 6 Tips to Help You:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph7-q9GOMR0
  5. Michael. How to Draw and Paint Channel on YouTube. “Drawing Lesson: River Bed Exercise:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohcSwOKumGE
  6. Virtual Instructor: “Drawing Exercises:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1sW99idvak
  7. Patti Stewart”How to Illustrate a Book:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MScZchvX97E
  8. Will Terry. “Drawing Characters: – One of 7 videos. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWxdLNLKJvk
  9. Will Terry. “How to Illustrate a Children’s Book:”  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpVZF7FbQww
  10. Will Terry. “How to Improve Your Drawing Skills Quicker” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbb_ctVMTeA

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015

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11 Blogs Received the Liebster Award from Me


liebster Award for Bloggers Discover new bloggers

“11 Blogs Received the Liebster Award from Me” by Joan Y. Edwards

Kathleen Burkinshaw gave me the Liebster award! Then, I gave the Liebster Award to 11 other blogs that might have fewer than 200 followers. Even though I have more than 200 followers, Kathleen wanted to let me know how much my blog helped her. Thank you, Kathleen. What a great compliment you give me by not only being my friend but reading my blog and sharing it with others. I am honored.

Here are the 11 blogs that received the Liebster Award from me in no certain order:

  1. Linda Martin Andersen http://lindamartinandersen.wordpress.com/
  2. Kristina Stanley http://kristinastanley.com/blog/
  3. Joy Acey  http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/
  4. Becky Shillington http://beckyshillington.blogspot.com/
  5. Julia Marie Shea https://juliamarieshea.wordpress.com
  6. Melodie Nelson http://300pagesordays.com/
  7. Ann Eisenstein http://anneisenstein.com/category/blog/
  8. Dr. Bob Rich https://bobrich18.wordpress.com
  9. Sabrina Colvin https://mamabeanablog.wordpress.com/
  10. Karen Tomas https://karenanntomas.wordpress.com/
  11. Fiona McVie https://authorsinterviews.wordpress.com

Here is my list of 11 questions for the bloggers above to answer.

  1. Favorite color
  2. Three favorite books
  3. Favorite place in the world
  4. Any pets?
  5. Can you play a musical instrument?
  6. Any hobbies?
  7. 3 favorite foods?
  8. Coffee, tea, water, or soda?
  9. What is one thing you would never part with?
  10. Where is your favorite place to write, draw, or create things? Why?
  11. What is your favorite movie or TV program?

The Rules:

Please know you do NOT have to participate.  On a new blog post, announce that you were given the Liebster award, Thank the person who gave it to you and post a link to his/her blog. Answer the 11 questions sent by them.  Give the Liebster Award to 11 blogs you believe your readers would enjoy who, as far as you know, have fewer than 200 signed up followers. Write 11 questions for them.  Then let them know you gave them this award. That’s it.

Here are my answers to Kathleen’s questions:

  1. Favorite color Blue
  2. Favorite book The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
  3. Favorite place in the world Home
  4. Any pets? No
  5. Can you play a musical instrument? Piano and recorder, a little, a tiny bit (Not for others)
  6. Any hobbies? Writing, illustrating, sewing, visiting with family and friends
  7. Favorite food? Fried Flounder
  8. Tea or coffee? Decaffeinated tea
  9. What is one thing you would never part with? My computer
  10. If you write, where is your favorite place to write? In my office
  11. Favorite movie/TV program? “My Cousin, Vinny”/Columbo

Thank you again, Kathleen Burkinshaw. You are a jewel. I know people enjoy reading your blog, Creating Through the Pain. It reaches from heart to heart.

Thank you for reading my blog. What is your favorite blog? Why? I look forward to reading your comments. If I have ten different blogs named in the comment area, I’ll make a blog post with the links and a quote from you telling why you liked them.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015

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10 Songs to Shake It Off and Keep You Going


Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“10 Songs to Shake It Off and Keep You Going”

I haven’t done a music or sounds blog in a while. I love music. It soothes my body and my soul. When I’m in a sad mood, it can change my focus and make me smile. These songs I hope you will like and that one or more of them will help you let go of something that’s bothering you and renew your belief in yourself so that you keep on going towards your life’s goals.

If you don’t know where you are going, God knows. He is very proud of you. He will help you get where you want to go.

  1.  Shake it Off ” Taylor Swift Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEcS32iOH5s
    Lyrics: http://www.metrolyrics.com/shake-it-off-lyrics-taylor-swift.html
  2. Let It Go” from the movie Frozen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0MK7qz13bU
    Idina Menzel’s Lyrics: http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/idinamenzel/letitgo.html
  3. “Never Give Up” – Johnny Orlando original song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1O7JkEcm-fY
    Lyrics: http://www.johnnyofans.com/lyrics.php
  4. “Never Give Up” – God is always there” Hillsong Kids https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15R6SNZ-K1g
    Lyrics http://www.lyricsmania.com/never_give_up_lyrics_hillsong_kids.html
  5.  “Hero” by Mariah Carey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0IA3ZvCkRkQ
    Lyrics: http://www.metrolyrics.com/hero-lyrics-mariah-carey.html
  6. The Climb” Video: Miley Cyrus’ “The Climb” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UsaWvf1Kw3A
    Lyrics: http://www.metrolyrics.com/the-climb-lyrics-miley-cyrus.html
  7. Let it Be” The Beatles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcBnJw-H2wQ
    Lyrics: http://www.lyrics.com/let-it-be-lyrics-the-beatles.html
  8. We Will Get There” by Stephanie Sun https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZWWCY0y6v4
    Lyrics http://www.songlyrics.com/stefanie-sun/we-will-get-there-lyrics/
  9. Celebration” by Kool and the Gang: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GwjfUFyY6M
    Lyrics: http://www.oldielyrics.com/lyrics/kool_the_gang/celebration.html 
  10. Things I Am Thankful for” Hap Palmer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKl8BuVWnUA
    This version leaves blanks for you to say what you are thankful for: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=160VWPsM_og
    Lyrics: http://www.songlyrics.com/hap-palmer/things-i-m-thankful-for-lyrics/

What songs inspire you and keep you going? Please share them with me.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015

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So You Want to Write a Picture Book


Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“So You Want to Write a Picture Book” by Joan Y. Edwards

Before beginning say the following affirmations: three times: I can write a great picture book. My picture book gets published. The illustrations in my book are outstanding. My publisher and I sell more than a hundred thousand copies of my picture book.

Picture books are stories usually have illustrations on every page of the book.  If there are 32 pages in the whole book, the story usually begins after the title page, copyright page, and dedication page. The illustrations help to tell the story. Without some of the pictures, the reader might not understand the story. In other words, the text depends on the illustrations to explain part of the story. An author can both write the story and draw the illustrations, or one person can write the story while a different person illustrates it.

Karen Cioffi shared that Claire Saxby quoted a publisher’s definition of a picture book as “40% words, 40% illustration, and 20% X-factor.”

How to Write a Picture Book

Step 1 Read 100 picture books.

Step 2 Study the Types of Picture Books

Joan Y. Edwards. “What Are Picture Books?” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/01/11/what-are-picture-books/

Patrice Sherman. “A Few Picture Book Basics,” http://www.writingpicturebooksforchildren.com/a-few-picture-book-basics.html

Patrice Sherman. “Kinds of Picture Books,” http://www.writingpicturebooksforchildren.com/types-of-picture-books.html

Step 3 Read Guidelines for a picture book.

Guidelines for a Picture Book

  • Write a complete story in  (Pages with no story (Title page, back of title page (Copyright page), dedication, back of dedication page (picture) 1 single page, 24 double-spread pages, and 1 single last page)8 of the pages out of 24 pages with a beginning, middle, and end.
  • Use between 500 and 800 words. Some publishers allow more words; others want less.
  • Write a character-based story with a character faced with a problem, trying the solve the problem and failing, and then solving the problem by changing something inside them.
  • Write another type of picture book: Concept or Slice of Life or Non-Fiction.
  • Use colorful illustrations to help tell the story and add to its enjoyment.
  • Some editors like good rhyming. Others don’t
  • Some editors like slice of life stories. Others don’t.
  • Join other writers in writing a picture book:

Step 3. Don’t have your picture book critiqued until it is finished and you, yourself, have edited and revised it three times.

Step 4. Have your story critiqued by your writing group. Revise and change only ideas you agree with 100 per cent. When you have a quality manuscript, go to Step 5.

Submit Your Quality Picture Book Manuscript to a Publisher, Editor, Agent, or Contest

Step 5.  Follow the Pub Sub directions:

Week 1 Choose an editor, agent, or contest. Here are two posts on my blog to help you find a publisher or an agent.

Week 2 Follow their guidelines.

Week 3 Time to Submit to agent, editor, contest, critique group, or professional editor

Week 4  Celebrate, Live, Educate, Motivate, Write, Revise, Get Critiqued. Go to Week 1 with another story.

More Pub Subber posts on my blog

Resources about Picture Books:

  1. Charlotte Hucks. “Evaluation Guide for Picture Books,” http://highered.mheducation.com/sites/0073378569/student_view0/chapter5/evaluation_guides.html.
  2. Enoch Pratt Free Library. “What Are Picture Books?” http://www.prattlibrary.org/locations/children/index.aspx?id=4116
  3. Erika Griffin. “Inferring How and Why Characters Change,” http://www.readwritethink.org/resources/resource-print.html?id=858.
  4. Goodreads. “Slice of Life Books,” http://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/slice-of-life.
  5. Jil Casey. “The Art of Children’s Picture Books,” http://theartofchildrenspicturebooks.blogspot.com/ 
  6. Joan Green. “Unit of Study: Slice of Life Writing,” http://swpunitsofstudy.pbworks.com/w/page/10059712/Unit%20of%20Study%3A%20%20Slice%20of%20Life%20Writing.
  7. Julie Ballew. “A Closer Look at Characters,” http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2012/10/closer-look-characters.
  8. Laura Backes. “The Three Commandments of Writing a Picture Book,” http://writeforkids.org/2014/08/the-three-commandments-of-writing-a-picture-book/.
  9. Marisa Montes. “Notes on Writing Picture Books,” http://www.marisamontes.com/writing_picture_books.htm.
  10. Martin Salisbury and Morag Styles. Children’s Picture Books: The Art of Visual Storytelling, Laurence King Publishers, 2012
  11. Olympia.org. Chapter 2, “The Art of Picture Books,” http://www.staff.olympia.org/external/OHSLibrary/art.pdf
  12. Penny Lockwood Ehrenkranz. “Eight Things Picture Book Editors Don’t Want,” http://www.writing-world.com/children/picture.shtml
  13. Robert Vaux. “How to Evaluate Children’s Literature,”
    http://www.ehow.com/how_4912531_evaluate-childrens-literature.html?ref=Track2&utm_source=ask.
  14. Ruth Ayres. “What is Slice of Life?” https://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/2011/01/24/what-is-a-slice-of-life/.
  15. Tara Lazar. “How To Write Children’s Picture Books,” http://writetodone.com/six-best-tips-writing-childrens-picture-books.
  16. Uri Shulevitz. Writing with Pictures: How to Write and Illustrate Children’s Books.

Thanks for reading my blog. Good luck with getting all of your picture books written, revised, critiqued, and revised again to the point of a quality manuscript ready for submission.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015

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15 Ways to Get Out of the Dark Side of Emotions


Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“15 Ways to Get Out of the Dark Side of Emotions” by Joan Y. Edwards

I’m sure you’ve found yourself experiencing the dark side of emotions. It’s like you’re completely surrounded by dark thoughts that you may keep secret from others: abandonment, addiction, anger, arrogance, blame, criticism, defensiveness, emotional pain, fear, frustration, gluttony, gossip, guilt, gluttony, helpless, holding grudges, impatience, judgment, lack, lust, repulsiveness to body, prejudice, regret, resentment, road rage, self-righteousness which to me means stress for the body, mind, and spirit.

How can you lift yourself out of the doldrums into the land of positive thoughts: feeling of belonging, freedom, acceptance, humility, love, abundance, living with purpose, feeling worthy of care, good health, wealth, healing, and joy?

The first thing to do is accept that you’re in the pits. The second thing is to believe it’s okay to be there. The third thing is to take action in your mind and with your body to get yourself out.

Here are a few ideas to help change your focus. When you change your focus. You’ll change your mood.

  1. Be thankful. Name aloud or in your mind, a long list of things for which you are thankful.
  2. Make a list of 5 things that need doing around the house or at work that can be done in a short amount of time (5 to 10 minutes). Doing one or more of these items will give you a sense of accomplishment which will improve your mood.
  3. Listen to your favorite music. If you’re in an area where you can’t disturb others, use earplugs. Make a CD of your favorite songs.
  4. Love yourself.
  5. Go dig in the dirt. Dirt is grounding. Make a new flower bed. Get the weeds out of the flower bed you have now.
  6. Drink a glass of water. Being hydrated helps you think clearly.
  7. Take a bath or a shower.
  8. Write out new goals and ways to reach them.
  9. Watch your favorite movies.
  10. Give yourself a certain time limit to be sad and enjoy a pity party.
  11. Call a friend who is upbeat and accepting of you.
  12. Work a puzzle.
  13. Create something in your favorite colors.
  14. Fix your favorite foods.
  15. Walk or do other exercise for 15 minutes.

Monitor your thoughts and your words.Look for some subconscious belief you have that may have been responsible for part of your situation. If you can change your thoughts, words, and beliefs, you will change the way things are happening in your life.

Let me explain. My husband, Carl, was sick at Christmas time for four or five years in a row. Maybe more. In 2010 I heard him say, “I always get sick at Christmas.”

Think about how powerful his words were. That was his belief.  Not consciously until he became aware of it. Once I asked him if that’s what he wanted, he changed his words both outside and within himself and he hasn’t been sick at Christmas since then.

If you’re like me, you catch yourself saying, “I can’t do that.” Our brains are like computers and they want us to be right, so they search the world for experiences that reflect our inner beliefs.  So when you try to do things,  you can’t do them simply because you say that you can’t do them.

When I taught Kindergarten at Hemby Bridge School in Indian Trail, North Carolina, there was a set of monkey bars. Students loved to climb across it hanging by their hands and arms on each rung as they glided across. However, I’d noticed several students falling and getting hurt. I monitored the monkey bars. I told the students: To cross the monkey bars, you have to be able to tell me that you can do it. They would line up and say, “I want to cross the monkey bars.”

I asked them, “Can you do it?”

If they answered, “Yes, I can do it,” I allowed them to climb across it.

If they answered, “I can’t do it,” I told them I couldn’t let them cross and perhaps break an arm or something. Their parents would be ticked off with me. I told them to watch and study how the others crossed the monkey bars. When you have figured it out and think you can cross, let me know.

One of my kindergarteners wanted to cross but she told me she couldn’t do it. After she studied the others for about 15 minutes, she said, “I can do it.”

I told her, “Okay. Go ahead and do it.”

And she did. Everyone clapped for her. She was ecstatic and so were we.

What had she done? She had changed her belief system.

That’s what you might need or want to do, too.  Change your belief system.

Say, “I can do it.” Educate yourself. Practice the skills. Do it in your mind first. Visualize yourself being successful. Take a leap of faith.  Do it.

I hope you enjoyed reading this post. Please share how you get out of the doldrums. Remember you are a gift from God to our world. I am glad you are here.

Of course, you can use these same ideas to get your main character out of the doldrums, too.

If you liked this blog post, you might also enjoy my blog post:

“Twelve Ways to Get Over Disappointment:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/twelve-ways-to-get-over-disappointment/

Celebrate you.
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

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273 Subscribers. When you subscribe you’ll receive new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as Joan uploads them PLUS 2 free gifts: 12 Affirmations for Writers and a Never Give Up image. Thank you.

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