Kathleen Burkinshaw Won a Free Critique


 

man smiling listening on cell phone to his ear

The Winner Is image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

“Kathleen Burkinshaw Won a Free Critique” by Joan Y. Edwards

Winner:
Thank you to Dr. Bob Rich, Linda Andersen, and Kathleen Burkinshaw for leaving a comment before midnight, September 9, 2016 on  Questions to Ask Before You Sign a Contract with a Publisher/.

Random.org chose number 3 as the winner of the Givewawy. The winner of a free 1,000 word critique is Kathleen Burkinshaw.

Congratulations, Kathleen. Please send me 1000 words of the manuscript you’d like for me to critique for you to joanyedwards1@gmail.com

Thank you to all of you who read my blog. I appreciate you.

Never Give Up
Joan

How to Prepare for Your Upcoming Conference


How to Prepare for Your Next Conference image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards.jpg

How to Prepare for Your Next Conference image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

“How to Prepare for Your Upcoming Conference” by Joan Y. Edwards

Here are a few key ways to prepare for a conference that you will attend in person. I wrote this with writers and illustrators in mind. However, I believe most of the ideas would be beneficial and could be adapted to anyone attending a conference in any profession. It’s in 3 parts: before the conference, during the conference, and after the conference. I hope that by attending a conference, you’ll learn a new skill or marketing technique that inspires you to reach your goals.

Before the Conference

  1. What skill do you most want to improve? Attend the workshops that will help you improve that skill.
  2. Visit the webpages of at least three of the presenters that interest you. If they have a website, read the about me. Check out their books at your local library or on Amazon or Barnes and Noble.

  3. If you have specific questions for presenters, write them down on 3×5 cards and ask them at the conference during the workshops. If you don’t get a chance to ask them in person, most handouts or websites give contact information so you can write and ask them later.

  4. Get business cards with your name, address, phone number, email address, website, and blog. Many people put an image and link to their published books on the back. Use www.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.comwww.BCEofNC.com, or local print shop. You can also create business cards on your computer.

  5. Giveaways – Get bookmarks printed: www.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.comwww.BCEofNC.com. You can also make bookmarks by hand or on your computer.

  6. Giveaways – Get postcards printed of your best illustrations or of your book covers with a selling pitch for them: www.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.comwww.BCEofNC.com. You can also make bookmarks by hand or on your computer.

  7. Buy a new spiral notebook with a bright colorful design or a composition book with a black and white cover. This way all of your notes are in one place. You can put it in front of your computer when you get home, and transfer your handwritten notes to your computer. You can add information from handouts by scanning them into your computer, or by typing what you want to remember from the handouts.

  8. Buy two pens that are dependable and write just the way you like a pen to write. Put them in your pocketbook to take with you.

  9. Write a pitch for three of your manuscripts. Print out your pitches on 3×5 cards, 4×6 inch cards, or plain 8.5 x 11 printing paper. Carry two copies of each pitch with you to the conference. Put one copy in a folder and the other in your pocketbook. Practice giving your pitch in front of a mirror. Use eye contact. Memorize it.

  10. Take comfortable clothing to wear in your favorite colors to keep your spirits high. Take a sweater or blazer, in case the air conditioning is too cool for your inner thermostat. If you’re hot, you can take off the blazer. A good work attire for writers/illustrators is a pair of jeans, a shirt, and a blazer. Linda Rohrbough says that you want the editors to think you just left your computer to meet with them. Be comfortable. If you feel better being all dressed up, dress up. It’s important for you to be comfortable and feel distinguished.

  11. Check your laptop, iPad, or iPhone. Charge its battery. Purchase a portable disc drive or flash drive. Most of them are USB port compatible. Copy your full manuscripts of the Works in Progress and other pertinent information you may need for the conference to a portable drive. If you use Dropbox, you can put your manuscripts in it on your main computer. Add the Dropbox app to your iPad or other electronic device. You can see your manuscript from all devices. Check it out before you leave home.

At the Conference

1.Take notes.

Take notes using your new spiral notebook or composition book or take notes on your laptop or other device.

2.Hand out business cards.

Hand out business cards to everyone with whom you talk. Ask for their business cards, too. This will give you resources to check after the conference. The more you do this, the more comfortable and natural it will be for you. Make a goal of handing out at least 10-30 cards and getting an equal number in exchange.

3.Talk to people sitting beside you in a workshop.

Do you feel lonely and out of touch with people? Talk to the people who sit beside you in the workshops. Exchange names, email addresses, and business cards with them. Here are possible questions to start your conversation:

“What are you writing?”
“Are you in writing group? Is it online or face-to-face?”
“How do you find time to write (illustrate)?”
“Do you (draw) write best in the morning or at night?”

4.  If you meet a publisher or agent, ask them questions about themselves and their projects.

If you happen to meet an agent or editor in the elevator or at lunch, remember he/she is human, like you. Ask one of these questions or one of your own:

“What is your favorite project right now?”
“How do you know when a book is right for you?”
“What’s your advice for writers(illustrators)?”

5. Be ready to answer questions about your writing with a pitch.

After your question for an editor or agent, there is a great possibility he/she will ask you, “What kind of writing do you do?” This is a perfect lead in for your pitch. Hold your head high. Look the editor/agent in the eye. Pretend he’s your best friend and tell him your pitch.

6. Take a short walk for exercise in between sessions.

7. Get plenty of sleep.

8. Eat healthy fruits, vegetables, and proteins. Drink plenty of water. This will keep you alert and focused.

9. Enjoy yourself and learn as much as you can.

10. List twenty things for which you are thankful each morning before you get out of bed.

11. Thank the presenters and the organizers

Tell the presenters and organizers what you liked about the conference. Make suggestions for improvements.

12. If you a book inspires you at the workshop, buy it or ask for it at your public library.

After the Conference

1. Sleep, if you’re tired.

Accept yourself and others as you are. Focus on what you want. Be thankful for what you have. Be grateful for where you are. Put the fun back into your writing.

2. After you’ve rested, read and organize your notes from each workshop.

Edit your notes and add information from your handouts. You can scan pertinent information from the handouts into your computer.  Write at least three major things you learned from each workshop. You can write down more details if you want.

3. Make a top ten list of things that you learned at the overall conference.

4. Write/Revise Your Writing/Illustrating Goals

After this information soaks into your mind, body, and spirit, write/revise three writing/illustrating goals using the skills and information you learned. (Be patient with yourself.)

5. Writing Skill/Genre Goals

a) Read ten books in your chosen genre and three books on the craft of writing and/or illustrating.

b) Revise your favorite manuscript and submit it to an editor or agent.

6. Marketing Goals

a) Learn a new technology.

b) Submit manuscripts/sample illustrations to different agents and/or editors often.

c) Join my Pub Subbers Yahoo Group, a group to encourage you to submit your manuscript/portfolio often (monthly if possible). To join, write me and tell me why you would like to join at joanyedwards1@gmail.com. Members post successes, ask other members for help. etc. Members receive automated reminders for the weekly steps to get your work ready for submission.

Pub Subbers

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

d) Prepare a book presentation for schools/organization.

e) Prepare a proposal to present a workshop for a writing conference.

f) Prepare a pitch for a manuscript. Go from a page summary and then focus on the words to hook readers. Keep shortening your pitch: 200-100-50-25 words. The ultimate goal is a pitch that is 140 characters long (approximately 25 words) that fits in Twitter. If you have all these different lengths, you will have a pitch to use in your cover letter, proposal, and for the rave blurbs for the back cover of your book. Your pitch is the magnetic tool that will entice people to buy your book.

g) Prepare a post card, business card, bookmark, signature for email to promote you and your writing. Use your book titles and pitch blurbs.

7. Networking Goals

a) Create a website and/or blog.

b) Join a critique group.that focuses on genres you write or illustrate.

c) Give book presentations/workshops for schools and organizations

d) Create an author/illustrator page on Facebook and post news of your publishing journey.

e) Create a Twitter Account. Twitter your blog posts and your publishing news.

f) Visit the website of three people who shared a business card with you.  Email them. Here are possible points to include in your email. Remind them of how you enjoyed talking with them. Thank them for sharing a resource. Congratulate them on their manuscript or book. Compliment them for being brave if they read their story at open mike. Thank them for giving you a new way to look at a problem.

g) Make a list of your followers on Facebook and Twitter. When you get your book published, they will be helpful in spreading the word about your book.  Interact with at least 25 of them on a regular basis.

Resources

  1. Kristen Lamb, “Getting the Most Out of Writing Conferences:” http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2010/04/07/getting-the-most-out-of-writing-conferences/.
  2. Margo L. Dill, “Writers Conferences: Five Reasons Why You Should Go NOW, and How to Get the Most for Your Money:” http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/13-FE-MargoDill.html/.
  3. Marita Littauer, “Four Keys for Writers Conference Success:” http://www.right-writing.com/conference-keys.html/.
  4. Yvonne Russell, “Getting the Most out of a Writers’ Conference:” http://www.growyourwritingbusiness.com/?p=47/.
  5. Do I Still Need Business Cards for Networking? (projecteve.com)

 

Thank you for reading my blog. Each time you read one of my articles, you honor me.  I hope your success is better than you ever imagined.

Click on comment and scroll down to the bottom of the page.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2012-2016 Joan Y. Edwards

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Believe It to Achieve It


Girl jumping over boxes

Believe It to Achieve It image Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

 

“Believe It to Achieve It” by Joan Y. Edwards

I remember my Mother, Ethel D. Meyer’s words. She said them many times: “God didn’t tell me life wasn’t going to be tough, but, he did say, he would be there with me.”

There have been times when I thought there wasn’t a way for me to reach the goals God set in my heart. Yet, when I keep on going, my experience has been that I make it through many tough experiences that make my heart sigh and shake my patience and faith. Somehow I’ve been able to persevere and keep on going and get to my goal.

Napoleon Hill said, “Whatever the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve.”

Stephen Richards said,  “When you concentrate your energy purposely on the future possibility that you aspire to realize, your energy is passed on to it and makes it attracted to you with a force stronger than the one you directed towards it.”

The videos below inspire me. I hope they inspire you to keep on going toward your goal.

  1. Joel Osteen. “Faith for the Middle” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRMyek2m-JE
  2. Dr. Robert Schuller. “Tough Times Never Last, but Tough People Do:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXMuiVLI7kA
  3. Charles Stanley. “Stages of Our Faith:” https://www.intouch.org/watch/in-the-school-of-faith/the-stages-of-our-faith-video.
  4. Billy Graham: “Technology and Faith:” https://www.ted.com/talk/billy_graham_on_technology_faith_and_suffering?language=en

Keep taking the necessary steps to get where you want to go. Take action even though it’s scary. Even though others may say you can’t do it. Even if you think you might fall at this step. Even if you can’t see beyond 25 feet ahead of you. As Jack Canfield says that the car shines only a certain amount of light in front of you, but you keep on driving your car. So you should keep on going when you don’t see completely how to do it all, but you see the first steps. A flashlight of faith will get you there. Even though you don’t know how it’s going to end. When you have faith and ask God for it, you will receive it. God has a way for you to get there. Believe it and go for it. Believe in you and your ability to get there! Believe with unwavering faith.

Believe it to achieve it.

Thanks for reading. I hope you reach your goals. I pray that you keep on going. Feel free to tell me something you achieved even when at first you weren’t sure about it. Click on comment and scroll down to the bottom of the page.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Believe in You with Unwavering Faith
Celebrate Each Step You Take
You’re Gonna Get There!
You Can Do It!

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

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Questions to Ask Before You Sign a Contract with a Publisher


Ask Questions Before Signing Image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

Ask Questions Before Signing Image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

“Questions to Ask Before You Sign a Contract with a Publisher” by Joan Y. Edwards

Questions to ask and information to know before you sign on the dotted line with a publisher. There are many things that came to my mind when I decided to write this article. I know that my list is not the end-all list. I know there are other factors for you to consider. However, if you find the answers to the questions posed here, I believe you will be on the path to a good publishing experience.

8 Things to Investigate Before You Submit to a Publisher

Consider this background check on your potential publisher.

  1. Check out their website. Look at the book covers. Are they eye-catching? Do they have at least ten books in your genre?
  2. Check on Preditors and Editors to see if there are any complaints about the publisher. http://pred-ed.com/.
  3. Check Whispers and Warnings on Writers Weekly: http://writersweekly.com/category/whispers-and-warnings
  4. Look for testimonies or complaints for the company on line. Search company name + scam (fraud, rip-off, lawsuits,”Better Business Bureau”)
  5. Do they charge fees for editing, illustrating, ISBN numbers or for any other reason? Traditional publishers will not charge you fees for anything. Vanity publishers or publishers to help you self-publish may charge fees. Usually, you don’t want to choose a publisher who charges fees. This is your choice. Believe in you.
  6. Buy one of their books or read one from the library. Check it for professional formatting and editing.
  7. Follow them on their company Facebook, GooglePlus, or LinkedIn pages. Sign up for their newsletters.
  8. Read their submission guidelines thoroughly and follow them with precision. Read their guidelines aloud. Check to make sure all requested items are in your submission package. If you don’t follow the guidelines, you’re sabotaging your success. Many publishers want you to submit your manuscript electronically; others prefer paper copies sent via snail mail. For more help with submission, check out Pub Subbers on my blog.
    Pub Subbers
    Week 1
    Week 2
    Week 3
    Week 4

17 Questions to Ask Yourself and Your Publisher Before You Sign a Contract

Here are 17 questions I think are worth asking before you sign your publishing contract.

 

  1. Do you have a return policy for bookstores? If the publisher doesn’t have a book return contract with the distributors, it may be difficult or impossible to get your books on the shelves of bookstores. About this book return policy. On behalf of the publishers who do not offer book returns any more: As I understand it, the contract says booksellers can return books from now to infinity and beyond. That’s not quite fair. It seems to me that having a 60 day return policy would be good, but not a lifetime return policy. When a big named national bookstore chain went into bankruptcy a few years ago, they nearly washed out a lot of small publishers because they returned so many books. The books weren’t necessarily returned in good condition which meant that they couldn’t be sold to anyone. The publishers had to return the money the booksellers paid for the books which was thousands of dollars. And all of it came out of the small publisher’s bank account at the same time from different bookstores. This was bad news for everyone – the bookseller and the publisher. Many of these small traditional book publishers had to do away with the return book policy for books for this reason. Some required loans to keep afloat.
  2. Will your publisher send galley proofs of your book for review by Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, or other reviewers before the book’s release? Who will review your book for them? How will you obtain reviews. Will your publisher assist you in obtaining more than 25 reviews on Amazon and Barnes and Noble, GoodReads, or other places where people buy books online. In 2013, Jeremy Greenfield stated that in 2011 more books were sold online than in physical bookstores according to Bowker Market Research. It’s possible that you don’t need your books in every brick and mortar bookstore. Perhaps you’ll only need to get them in your local bookstores.
  3. Will you be able to get your books into local bookstores on consignment? What cost will you have to pay for your books personally? What percentage discount will you receive? Bookstores demand a 40% discount for your books. If you only get a 30% discount when you buy the books from the publisher, you’ll be up a creek without a paddle in making enough profit when you bookstores take your books on consignment at 40% off. Some book stores charge a fee of $25.00 to $30.00 to carry your books in their stores on consignment.
  4. Who is going to buy your books? Who does your publisher see as the market for your book? People can order books from a bookstore with the ISBN number and probably will not have to pay for shipping. If they have Amazon Prime they will get free shipping. If they have the Barnes and Noble membership, they will get free shipping.
  5. Does your publisher have ways to get your books in libraries? How? How many of their books are in your local library? Libraries seem purchasing more digital copies because of tight budgets. Contact your local library and see if they’ll order a digital copy of your book.
  6. Who is your book distributor? Ingram and Baker and Taylor are possible ones. The printer and the book distributors both take a hunk out of the money your publisher receives when a book sells. The publisher has pay them a percentage of it.
  7. How will the publisher market your book? Online, in stores, and other ways? See if they can mention ten ways. What are ten ways you personally plan to market your book?
  8. Will the copyright be yours or yours and publishers? Writer’s Relief says to find an intellectual property lawyer who specializes in publishing to review your contract. Here’s a link to a sample contract from EPIC.org: http://epicorg.com/resources/9-model-contract.html/  Thank you, Dr. Bob Rich for suggesting this link.
  9. Is there an out clause for both you and the publisher in your contract? Writer’s Relief suggest that you ask an intellectual property lawyer who is skilled and experienced with reading over publishing contracts to give you his advice. Publishing companies go through changes. I signed with a company who stopped publishing children’s books a week or so after I signed my contract with them. If the publisher has been in business for a long time, chances are they’ll still be in business a few years down the road. If they’ve always published your genre, chances are they’ll still publish your genre. If they don’t, you should be able to opt out of your contract. Keep your eyes and ears open.
  10. Will your book be print on demand or bulk publishing (hundreds or thousands of copies at a time)? What size book?
  11. As the author, will you give me any free books? I received 2 free books. Kathleen Burkinshaw received 15 free books.Thanks for suggesting I add this question, Kathleen.
  12. Will they do an eBook, paperback, or hardback? Which copy will be first? Second? Third? What time frame? Some companies do the eBook first. Others do the hardback or paperback first. Some don’t do an eBook.
  13. If the publisher asks you if you’re willing to change your manuscript, ask them what kind of changes are they talking about? Are they only punctuation and grammar? Are they character and plot changes? Will you need to add chapters or take away chapters from a non-fiction book? Ask them to be specific so you can make a good decision.
  14. What is the maximum word count or number of pages for your final edit? Books cost more according to the number of pages. In an effort to keep the cost down, you and your publisher may limit the number of pages in your book.
  15. Will the editor be available by phone as well as by email? I suggest that you ask if you and your editor and the main editor of the imprint talk together to discuss the plans for editing your book before the editing process begins and then monthly to make sure all of you are on the same page.
  16. What is the scheduled release date? If the release date is many years away, are you willing to wait? Do you have enough patience and fortitude to carry you through a long process to publication. The waiting process for one year is stressful. Each segment of 6 months may add strain and stress to you personally. If the editing process takes longer than planned, this might put the publication date even farther down the path. How will you handle this emotionally?
  17. What percentage royalty will you receive on the amount of money the publisher receives for books sold? 8% for paperback? Would you get 50% for eBooks? Is your royalty higher than 8% for eBooks because there’s no shipping charges, printing charges, etc. What percentage for hardback copies?

Things you may not know

Authors pay for shipping books to them from publisher.
You may also have to pay the tax for your state of residence for the books that you order.
The state where you live expects you to turn in sales tax money to them for the books you sell.

I hope this blog helps you be more aware of things to look for and inspire you to ask more questions before you sign a contract with a publisher. I wrote these as an author; however, they would probably help an illustrator, too. I wrote them to help you to keep on going and not give up.

Resources

You inspire me. Thank you for reading my blog.

Please share questions or information you believe writers and illustrators should know before they sign the contract with a publisher. Click below and scroll down to the bottom to comment.

There was a Giveaway: Dr. Bob Rich, Linda Andersen, and Kathleen Burkinshaw left comments on this blog post after it  appeared on September 2, 2016 and before midnight on Friday, September 9, 2016. Random.org chose Kathleen Burkinshaw as the winner of the free 1000 word critique. Thank you, Kathleen and all of you who leave comments on my blog.  You make me smile. 

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

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Fear of the Lord: Which Characters Have It? Which Don’t?


Fear of the Lord image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

Fear of the Lord image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

 

“Fear of the Lord: Which Characters Have it? Which Don’t?” by Joan Y. Edwards

This is Part 7 and the last in a series of blogs about the Gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Fear of the Lord is a gift of the Holy Spirit.

Fear of the Lord means awe, wonder of the workings of God. Dictionary.com says It is a fear conjoined with love and hope, and is, therefore, not a slavish dread, but rather filial reverence. An incentive to penitence; Google states that religious means treated or regarded with a devotion and scrupulousness appropriate to worship.

Synonyms are God-fearing, religious, devoted, faithful, prayerful, theological, spiritual, devout, sacred, filled with wonder and awe, veneration

Antonyms are irreligious, disbelief, atheist, secular, profane, defile, sacrilegious

I like to put fear of the lord as meaning full of awe for all he’s capable of and all He’s done for me. When I was a child, I was taught to fear God because if I did wrong He would send me away from heaven. That was a severe punishment. As I grew older, I realized that I didn’t believe some of the things I had been taught. I learned that God is a forgiving God and that if you try your best to obey his ten commandments and love him above all things and love your neighbor as yourself, you would be okay. I believe that God is the ultimate Judge and will decide who goes to heaven and who doesn’t.

There are a few wonderful times in my life when I knew there was a creator who was very powerful, creative, and loving. When I viewed the Grand Canyon. When I looked through huge telescopes in the mountains and saw the planets as well as the stars. When I was pregnant with my daughters and experienced the wonder of new birth. I have learned that God sends people into my life for a reason. One of these very touching moments was when a principal tried to persuade my teacher assistant to teach with another person. He asked three different times and her answer was, “I want to teach with Mrs. York.” She stood beside me when I was under fire. She chose to be with me. Now that was godliness in humanity.

Have you ever loved someone so much that you didn’t want to hurt them or disappoint them? I think this is gift that the Holy Spirit gives to you and me.

With gifts, you don’t have to accept them or use them. It’s a choice.

Let’s examine movies, TV shows, and books for examples of fear of the lord or the absence of it:

Characters with fear of the lord

  1. Moses in the Bible
  2. Jonah in the Bible
  3. Charlie Brown in “The Great Pumpkin” cartoon and film
  4. ET in ET
  5. Uncle Remus in Song of the South
  6. Andy Griffith in Andy Griffith
  7. Mother Teresa in Mother Teresa: In My Own Words

Characters without fear of the lord

  1. It seems to me that Henry VIII could be considered sacrilegious because he killed so many people, even some of his wives. The Six Wives of Henry VIII.
  2. The people in the town who started The Lottery (movie) where someone in the town was stoned to death
  3. The Devil in the Bible when he’s tempting Jesus Christ
  4. The people selling things in the Temple when Jesus threw them out in the Bible.
  5. Joker in Batman because he wants to kill or hurt people just to aggravate Batman. (Comics, movie)
  6. Anakin/Darth Vader in Star Wars. (Book, Movie)
  7. Stepmother and Stepsisters in Cinderella (book and movie)

Resources

 

You make my day. Thank you for reading my blog.

Please let me know your favorite characters with fear of the lord and those without it in any way, shape, or form. Click below and scroll down to the bottom to comment.

COMMENT

 

Gifts of the Holy Spirit Blog Series

  • This is Part 7 and the last in the series. “Fear of the Lord: Which Characters Have It? Which Don’t?”

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

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Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join over 360 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

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    2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
    3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators

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Piety: Which Characters Have it? Which Don’t?


Piety image copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

Piety image copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

“Piety: Which Characters Have it? Which Don’t?” by Joan Y. Edwards

This is Part 6 in a series of blogs about the Gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Piety is a gift of the Holy Spirit.

Piety means holiness, reverence for God, saintliness, respect for the creator of the universe

Synonyms: respect, devotion, piousness, godliness, religious, fidelity, faithfulness, grace, passion for God, spirituality

Antonyms: disrespect, irreverence, atheism, treachery, faithlessness, ungodliness, overzealous, desperation, demon, sinful, evil

Fictional characters and true life people have both positive and negative traits. Sometimes these traits get tangled up in a battle within the person or with outside forces.  When you’re writing a fictional story, recanting a memoir, or putting a spin on a time in another person’s life, it helps to put things in perspective. What was it that spiraled the trait into a frenzy? What was the inciting incident that set two opposite goals or two emotions into a twirling pattern like a tornado in the character’s life. That’s what the readers want to know.  Your job as a writer is to put it in words that show the situation clearly so that readers feel the emotion and glue their eyes to the pages and don’t come up for air until the end.

Here’s a look at the fiction and nonfiction characters in books, TV, or movies with or without piety. When you read my list, you may not agree with the ones I listed. However, your mind will take you to visions of piety and evil at its highest level. When you have one character who is almost an angel and thrust him beside an evil one, there will be a change made to one or the other. It’s because hate and fear rattles the basic core of humanity.

Characters who have piety

  1. Serpico in the movie Serpico (biography) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070666/
  2. Mohandas K. Ghandi in Ghandi (autobiography, book, film) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083987/
  3. Anne in Diary of Anne Frank (autobiography, book, film) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052738/
  4. Helen Keller in The Story of My Life (autobiography, book) http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/821611.The_Story_of_My_Life
  5. Frederick Douglas in Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (autobiography, book) http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/36529.Narrative_of_the_Life_of_Frederick_Douglass
  6. Father Andrew in God’s Smuggler (Autobiography, book) by Father Andrew with John And Elizabeth Sherrill http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/824062.God_s_Smuggler
  7. Brent Jeffs in Lost Boy (Autobiography) by Brent W. Jeffs, Maia Szalavitz http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6314709-lost-boy

Characters who don’t have piety

  1. Jake La Motta in The Raging Bull (biography, book, film) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081398/
  2. Jordan Belfort in The Wolf of Wall Street (biography, book, film) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0993846/
  3. Sue Sylvester in Glee (TV Series) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1327801/
  4. The Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz (book, film) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032138/ 
  5. Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights (book, film) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1238834/
  6. Professor Umbridge from Harry Potter series (books, films) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0241527/
  7. Bob Ewell from To Kill a Mockingbird (autobiography of Harper Lee, book, film) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056592/

 

You mean a lot to me. Thank you for reading my blog.

Please let me know your favorite characters with piety and those without it in any way, shape, or form.  Click below and scroll down to the bottom to comment. I appreciate you very much. 

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Other Resources:

Gifts of the Holy Spirit Blog Series

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

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Knowledge: Which Characters Have it? Which Don’t?


Knowledge image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

Knowledge image Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

“Knowledge: Which Characters Have It? Which Don’t?” by Joan Y. Edwards

This is the Part 5 in a series of blogs about the Gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Knowledge means information, data, skills, facts derived from experience or education.

Synonyms are: awareness, consciousness, realization, perception, grasp, know-how, the inside story, familiarity

Antonyms are: unaware, naive, inexperienced, clueless, innocent, ignorant, stupidity, inability, unskilled

As I was thinking about movies, books, and television shows with characters who were knowledgeable or clueless, it was interesting that with most of these characters, there were times in the story where they were very aware and other times when they weren’t. This could be as a result of a character growing or having a setback. It could also show the ironies in a human life. In your stories, you are only showing a slice of life during a certain time in a character’s life in a certain place. Therefore, it’s possible for them to excel in knowledge or be completely clueless in this experience and not in another. The Absent Minded Professor shows the irony of a man who’s very smart, but absent-minded. When you magnify the little quirks in people, it makes for an interesting story. Think of a trait you can magnify or diminish to make a character everyone may love or hate, but one they’ll remember. Unforgettable characters make readers keep on reading.

Characters with knowledge

  1. Dr. Emmett Brown of Back to the Future http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088763/fullcredits/
  2. Wayne Szalinski in Honey, I Shrunk the Kids http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097523/
  3. Claudia Kincaid in From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070079/fullcredits?
  4. The paperboy in Better Off Dead http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088794/
  5. Miss Sue in The Blind Side http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0878804/fullcredits
  6. Noah in Noah http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1959490/fullcredits/
  7. Isaiah Edwards in Little House on the Prairie books and TV series http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071007/

Characters without knowledge

  1. Truman Burbank in The Truman Show http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120382/
  2. Wayne Szalinski in Honey, I Shrunk the Kids http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097523/
  3. Junie B. Jones in the Junie B. Jones book series
  4. Bill Gambini in My Cousin Vinny http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0104952/fullcredits/
  5. Lloyd Christmas and Harry Dunne in Dumb and Dumber http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0109686/fullcredits
  6. Ebenezer Scrooge in The Christmas Carol http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0029992/fullcredits/
  7. Wilbur in Charlotte’s Web http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070016/fullcredits/

“Top 10 Movies That Will Change Your Life:” https://faizmills.wordpress.com/2011/05/11/top-10-movies-that-will-change-your-life/

Gifts of the Holy Spirit

Please let me know your favorite characters with great knowledge or ones who are clueless about the world where they live.  Just click below and scroll down to the bottom to comment. I appreciate you very much. Good luck with your writing or illustrating.

 

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

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