• Blog Stats

    • 467,576 Reads
  • Contact Me

    joanyedwards1@gmail.com
  • Pub Sub to Publishers or Agents

  • Joan's Elder Care Guide Third Place, Favorite Non-Fiction Book in 2016, P&E Poll

  • Buy Now: 4RV Publishing, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Park Road Books

  • Draft cover

  • Copyright Notice

    Copyright © 2009-2017
    Joan Y. Edwards and her licensors.

    Active since 0ctober 9, 2009. Thank you for reading and leaving comments on my blog.

    Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this
    material without express and written permission
    from Joan Y. Edwards is strictly prohibited.

    Excerpts and links may be used, provided that
    full and clear credit is given to Joan Y. Edwards
    with appropriate links to the original content.

How to Draw in Two-Point Perspective


“How to Draw in Two-Point Perspective” by Joan Y. Edwards

Two-point perspective has two vanishing point lines heading out from one particular corner spot in an image. Usually at the top and bottom of a vertical line that juts out.

I found several pictures on Pixabay that might help you understand a little better about it. If a building juts out towards you, with lines going out from it in two other directions, it probably is in two-point perspective.

Also, if you’re looking at a room, where you can only see one corner of a room in the distance and two walls jutting at an angle from it, it probably is a two-point perspective.

Here are five images to help you understand.

Image Examples of Two-Point Perspective:

 

Image 1 – Two Point Perspective – Point is towards you (Pixabay)

Image 2 – Two Point Perspective – Point is away from you (Pixabay)

 

Image 3 – Two-point Perspective – Point is towards you (Pixabay)

Image 4 – Two-Point Perspective – Point is away from you (Pixabay)

 

Image 5 – Two-Point Perspective – Point is towards you (Pixabay)

 

Steps to Drawing a Building in Two-Point Perspective

  1. Draw your horizon line straight across the page.
  2. Draw two points about a half-inch from the edge of the paper: one on the left side of the horizon line and another on the right side of the horizon line. These are your two vanishing points. All diagonal lines will go through one of these points. I discovered that if I make each dot an X then, it was easier to find and easier to line up with it.
  3. Draw the middle line that juts out towards you.
  4. Draw a line from top of the jut line to the left vanishing point.
  5. Draw a line from the bottom of the jut line to the left vanishing point.
  6. Draw a line from the bottom of the jut line to the right vanishing point.
  7. Draw a line from the bottom of the jut line to the left vanishing point.

Here are two images I drew for you in two-point perspective.

The first is a sketch of a laundry room. This time the jut line is away from you. I hope you can tell what the items are. If you can’t, just write me a little note and ask.

Illustration of two-point perspective – Laundry Room Copyright 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

The second illustration is also one of two-point perspective. This time the jut line is facing you. I drew a part of a city, I only drew two buildings so that I wouldn’t cover up the original two vanishing points. I made the image in the blog especially big, so that you might be able to see the red X’s for the vanishing points.

Illustration of two point perspective – City buildings and park Copyright 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

I hope that you enjoyed reading my blog. I hope you’ll try doing two-point perspective or draw for the adventure of doing it. Just to think that I started out with a horizon line and 2 vanishing points on each end. Simply amazing to me. One of the reasons, I’ve been working on perspective is so I’ll be able to make the illustrations better for my chapter book, Larry, the Terrifying Turkey.

I guess you noticed that sometimes one or both of the vanishing points can act like the single vanishing point. Things tend to get smaller in the distance. On city streets, you might need more than two points of perspective.

I hope you will leave me a note. I love hearing from the people who read my blog. I’d be honored if you would share it with others on Facebook, Twitter, or email.

Lots of Resources – Lots and Lots of Resources

Websites:

  1. ContrastBlack Studio DesignTutsPlus.com. Technical Drawing for Beginners: Two Point Perspective:” https://design.tutsplus.com/articles/technical-drawing-for-beginners-two-point-perspective–vector-21862
  2. Hello Artsy.com. “2 Pt Perspective Drawing: Step by Step:” http://helloartsy.com/2pt-perspective/
  3. Instructables.com. “How to Make a Two Point Perspective Drawing:” http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Two-Point-Perspective-Drawing/

 

YouTube Videos

  1. Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw in 2-Point Perspective: A Modern House:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZ0IgP25sV8
  2. iDraw. “How To Draw In Two Point Perspective | Easy:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29-bPAhvzFI
  3. Frank Korb. “Two Point Perspective Stairs:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFwevKdC-r8&t=24s
  4. Circle Line Art School. Tom. “How to Draw an Airplane and Airport in 2-Point Perspective:” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgfeehj48a4
  5. Circle Line Art School. Tom. “How to Draw a City in Two Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNq78n02fMQ&t=167s
  6. Diane Wood. “How to Draw a Room in 2 Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCanYY7eLeA
  7. Joshua Hendry. Drawing Tutorial – 2 Point Perspective (Buildings):” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwYUHx4Yong
  8. Milan Claudio. “2-Point Perspective City Drawing Tutorial:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qUIVGKGzB8
  9. Online Drawing Lessons. “Two Point Perspective Drawing Tutorial (A Room):” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvTPywbY2yM
  10. Paul Priestley. “How to Use Two Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfvTGb1igZ4
  11. Suzette Morrow. “2 Point Perspective Drawing:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpLJT_SHqpU
  12. Virtual Instructor. “Two Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZ0IgP25sV8
  13. idraw. “How to Draw Two Point Perspective| Easy:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29-bPAhvzFI

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Flip Flap Floodle, Will this little duck’s song save him from Mr. Fox?
Joan’s Elder Care Guide published by 4RV Publishing

Blog post Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

 

***************************************************

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join over 417 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

  1. Never Give Up image
  2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
  3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators

Plant Success Seeds for Your Next Conference Now


fruits-863072_640 (1)

“Plant Success Seeds for Your Next Conference Now" by Joan Y. Edwards

You have the magical seeds needed for your success. Your inner mojo or magical power is there for you to use 24 hours a day.  Look for it. Plant it. Nourish it. To help you grow in confidence, you need to grow in skills and abilities. Plant these seeds for your success at your next conference.

 

Before the Conference

  1. Believe in you. Activate this belief. BELIEVE IN YOU AND YOUR ABILITIES. That's the first seed for success. Believe in you. You can do all things necessary for your success.
  2. Set your goals. What skill do you most want to improve? Attend the workshops that will help you improve that skill. I hope that by attending a conference, you’ll learn a new skill or marketing technique that inspires you to reach your goals. You have what it takes for success. You may have to look through different eyes, through a different window to see it.
  3. Visit the web pages of three presenters that interest you. If they have a website, read the about me section. Check out their books at your local library or on Amazon or Barnes and Noble.
  4. If you have specific questions for presenters, write them down on 3×5 cards and ask them at the conference during the workshops. If you don’t get a chance to ask them in person, most handouts or websites give contact information so you can write and ask them later.
  5. Get business cards with your name, address, phone number, email address, website, and blog. Many people put an image and link to their publishedbooks on the back. Usewww.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.com, or local print shop. You can also create business cards on your computer.
  6. Writers: Prepare a postcard, business card, bookmark. Use your book titles and pitch blurbs. Get these giveaways printed at www.VistaPrint.com,www.Gotprint.com, or other print shop. You can also create them by hand or with your computer.Illustrators: Prepare a portfolio of 10-20 of your illustrations. Make sure these are the kind of illustrations that you enjoy creating. Prepare a postcard with a sample illustration on it. If you have illustrated a published book, put it on one side and put a different story's illustration on the back of the postcard. Share with people you meet at the conference. Also send one of your postcards to the art directors for publishing companies represented at the conference.r illustrators. Get bookmarks and or postcards printed atwww.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.com, or other print shop. You can also create them by hand or on your computer.
  7. Buy a new spiral notebook with a bright colorful design, a composition book with a black and white cover, or a sketch book.This way all of your notes are in one place. You can put it in front of your computer when you get home, and transfer your handwritten notes to your computer. You can add information from handouts by scanning them into your computer, or by typing what you want to remember from the handouts.
  8. Writers: Buy two pens that are dependable and write just the way you like a pen to write. Put them in your pocketbook to take with you. Illustrators: Take a pencil, a ruler, and a white eraser.
  9. Write a pitch for three of your manuscripts. Print out your pitches on 3×5 cards, 4×6 inch cards, or plain 8.5 x 11 printing paper. Carry two copies of each pitch with you to the conference. Put one copy in a folder and the other in your pocketbook. Practice giving your pitch in front of a mirror. Use eye contact. Memorize it. If your pitch is longer than on 3×5 index card, it is too long.
  10. Take comfortable clothing to wear in your favorite colors to keep your spirits high. Take a sweater or blazer, in case the air conditioning is too cool for your inner thermostat.If you’re hot, you can take off the blazer. A good work attire for writers/illustrators is a pair of jeans, a shirt, and a blazer. Linda Rohrbough says that you want the editors to think you just left your computer to meet with them. Be comfortable. If you feel better being all dressed up, dress up. It’s important for you to be comfortable and feel distinguished. Wear comfortable shoes.
  11. Check your laptop, iPad, or iPhone. Charge its battery. Bring your charger to the conference.
  12. Copy the  full manuscripts of your Works in Progress and other pertinent information you may need for the conference to a portable drive or flash drive for your laptop or use a cloud data holder. If you use Dropbox, you can put your manuscripts in it and access it from your iPad or iPhone or other electronic devices. It allows you to see your manuscript from all devices. Check it out before you leave home to make sure it works.
  13. Check out the directions to the conference. Find the restaurants that are located close to the conference that serve the kind of food you can eat.

At the Conference

1.Take notes.

Take notes using your new spiral notebook or composition book or take notes on your laptop or other device.

2.Hand out business cards.

Hand out business cards to everyone with whom you talk. Ask for their businesscards, too. This will give you resources to check after the conference. The more you do this, the more comfortable and natural it will be for you. Make a goal of handing out at least 10-30 cards and getting an equal number in exchange.

3.Talk to people sitting beside you in a workshop.

Do you feel lonely and out of touch with people? Talk to the people who sit beside you in the workshops. Exchange names, email addresses, and business cards with them. Here are possible questions to start your conversation:

“What are you writing?”

“Are you in writing group? Is it online or face-to-face?”

“How do you find time to write (illustrate)?”

“Do you (draw) write best in the morning or at night?”

4.  If you meet a publisher or agent, ask them questions about themselves and their projects.

If you happen to meet an agent or editor in the elevator or at lunch, remember he/she is human, like you. Ask one of these questions or one of your own:

“What is your favorite project right now?”
“How do you know when a book is right for you?”
“What’s your advice for writers(illustrators)?”

5. Writers: Be ready to answer questions about your writing with a pitch.

After your question for an editor or agent, there is a great possibility he/she will ask you, “What kind of writing do you do?” This is a perfect lead in for your pitch. Hold your head high. Look the editor/agent in the eye. Pretend he’s your best friend and tell him your pitch.

Illustrators: Be ready to answer questions about your illustrating. Tell people three things you like to draw and if your like to portray humor, the dark side, nature, etc.

6. Take a short walk for exercise in between sessions.

7. Get plenty of sleep.

8. Eat healthy fruits, vegetables, and proteins. Drink plenty of water. This will keep you alert and focused.

9. Enjoy yourself and learn as much as you can.

10. List twenty things for which you are thankful each morning before you get out of bed.

11. Thank the presenters and the organizers.

12. If you are inspired by a book you hear about or see in the bookstore at the conference, buy it or borrow it from your public library.

After the Conference

1. Sleep, if you’re tired.

Accept yourself and others as you are. Focus on what you want. Be thankful for what you have. Be grateful for where you are. Put the fun back into your writing.

2. After you’ve rested, read and organize your notes from each workshop.

Edit your notes and add information from your handouts. You can scan pertinent information from the handouts into your computer.  Write at least three major things you learned from each workshop. You can write down more details if you want.

3. Make a top ten list of things that you learned at the overall conference.

4. Write/Revise Your Writing/Illustrating Goals

After this information soaks into your mind, body, and spirit, write/revise three writing/illustrating goals using the skills and information you learned. (Be patient with yourself.)

5. Writing Skill/Genre Goals

a) Read ten books in your chosen genre and three books on the craft of writing and/or illustrating.

b) Revise your favorite manuscript and submit it to an editor or agent.

c)  Revise 3 of your favorite illustrations. Choose one to create a new postcard and send to a prospective publishing company.

6. Marketing Goals

a) Learn a new technology.

b) Submit manuscripts/sample illustrations to different agents and/or editors often.

c) Join or create a critique group.

c) Join my Pub Subbers Yahoo Group, a group to encourage you to submit your manuscript/portfolio often (monthly if possible). To join, write me and tell me why you would like to join at joanyedwards1@gmail.com. Members postsuccesses, ask other members for help. etc. Members receive automated reminders for the weekly steps to get your work ready for submission.

Pub Subbers
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4

d) Prepare a book presentation for schools/organization.

e) Prepare a proposal to present a workshop for a writing conference.

f) Prepare a pitch for a manuscript. Go from a page summary and then focus on the words to hook readers. Keep shortening your pitch: 200-100-50-25 words. The ultimate goal is a pitch that is 140 characters long (approximately 25 words) that fits in Twitter. If you have all these different lengths, you will have a pitch to use in your cover letter, proposal, and for the rave blurbs for the back cover of yourbook. Your pitch is the magnetic tool that will entice people to buy your book.

7. Networking Goals

a) Create a website and/or blog.

b) Join a critique group.that focuses on genres you write or illustrate.

c) Give book presentations/workshops for schools and organizations

d) Create an author/illustrator page on Facebook and post news of your publishing journey.

e) Create a Twitter Account.Tweet your blog posts and your publishing news.

f) Visit the websites of three people who shared a business card with you.  Email them. Here are possible points to include in your email. Remind them of how you enjoyed talking with them. Thank them for sharing a resource. Congratulate them on their manuscript, portfolio, or book. Compliment them for being brave if they read their story at open mike. Thank them for giving you a new way to look at a problem.

g) Make a list of your followers on Facebook and Twitter. When you get your book published, they will be helpful in spreading the word about your book.  Interact with at least 25 of them on a regular basis.

Resources

  1. Amy Bishop. http://www.projecteve. "Do I Still Need Business Cards for Networking?" http://www.projecteve.com/do-i-still-need-business-cards-for-networking/
  2. Deborah Shane. "What to Do Before Attending a Conference?" https://smallbiztrends.com/2014/04/what-to-do-before-attending-a-conference.html
  3. Kristen Lamb, “Getting the Most Out of Writing Conferences:” http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2010/04/07/getting-the-most-out-of-writing-conferences/.
  4. Margo L. Dill, “Writers Conferences: Five Reasons Why You Should Go NOW, and How to Get the Most for Your Money:” http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/13-FE-MargoDill.html/.
  5. Marita Littauer, “Four Keys for Writers ConferenceSuccess:” http://www.right-writing.com/conference-keys.html/.
  6. Travelle. "How to Prepare for a Conference:"http://www.huffingtonpost.com/travelle/how-to-prepare-for-a-conf_b_8413424.html
  7. Yvonne Russell, “Getting the Most out of a Writers’ Conference:” http://www.growyourwritingbusiness.com/?p=47/.

Thank you for reading my blog. Each time you read one of my articles, you honor me.  I hope your success is better than you ever imagined.

Click on comment and scroll down to the bottom of the page.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2012-2017 Joan Y. Edwards

***************************************************


Join over 420 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

  1. Never Give Up image
  2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
  3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators

One Point Perspective – Art


Pixabay one point perspective road-166543__480

Pixabay – Creative Commons

“One Point Perspective – Art” by Joan Y. Edwards

When I was in college at Western Carolina University, I took a few art courses. In one of them the instructor taught us one point perspective. We went outside and painted different buildings from across the street in one point perspective. My sister, Janet, says she still has those drawings. It’s amazing that watching You-Tube videos can refresh your memory and also give you new techniques to help you improve your drawing of things in perspective. I listed resources I personally liked that teach you one point perspective.

Definition: What is perspective?

Helen South states that “Perspective drawing gives a three-dimensional feeling to a picture. In art, it is a system of representing the way that objects appear to get smaller and closer together the further away they are in the scene.”

Things seem to get farther and farther away until they vanish at a point. Many times that point is near the middle of the page, but doesn’t have to. If you’re looking down the street, objects closer to you look larger than the objects farther away from you.

Here are a few other images that show you one point perspective:

Pixabay tree path road-21205__480

Pixabay Image – Creative Commons

Notice how everything seems to lead to one particular point in the images near the back of the picture. Everything close to you looks bigger and items farther away get smaller.  With the trees you can see more of he front tree than you can of the others. You can see more of the buildings that are closer to you, than the ones that are farther away.

Pixabay sidewalk-657906__480

Here are hints for drawing in one point perspective:

  • Make all diagonal (slanted) lines so that they come from the single dot vanishing point. The Vanishing Point marks where you stop seeing separate diagonal lines going away from you. It looks like they come together there. It makes things look smaller as they get farther away from your eyes. It makes things look larger as they get closer to your eyes. In other words, these diagonal lines that look like an upside down V help you see things on the page in perspective.
  • All straight lines across will be parallel with the horizon line.
  • All straight up and down (vertical) lines will be parallel with the right and left side edges of the paper.

Activities

Materials You’ll Need:  8.5 x 11 inch piece of paper, a ruler, a pencil, and a white eraser. 

If you are drawing a room in one point perspective, here is one way to begin:

IMG_0745

  1. Draw a line from the top left hand corner to the lower right hand corner of your paper.
  2. Draw a line from the top right hand corner to the lower left hand corner of your paper.
  3. Draw a straight line across the middle of the page. This will be your horizon line.
  4. Mark a dark dot in the middle of the horizon line. You can use a red colored pencil to help it stand out. This dot is called your vanishing point. 
  5. If you want, you can draw a rectangle to represent the wall at the far end of the room or hall.
  6. Now draw the hallway or room in detail with pictures on walls, desks, chairs, and doorways or windows.  Good luck😊!

If you are drawing a street scene, road, or railroad track scene, you might want to start with these directions:

IMG_0739

  1. Draw a straight line across the page close to the middle of the paper. This will be your horizon line.
  2. Draw a dot near the middle of the page. This will be your vanishing point.
  3. Decide how far apart you want your up-side-down V-shaped diagonal lines. Draw two diagonal lines that go from the vanishing point to the bottom of the page so that they are wider at the bottom.
  4. Draw the other items. Any slanted line will go through the vanishing point. The straight lines will be horizontal or vertical.

Exercises

  1. Print out one of the three pictures above or another one point perspective image from your own personal photo collection. Trace it or draw it using pencil and ruler. Be sure to note your horizon line and vanishing point, as well as the slanted, diagonal lines that all lead to the vanishing point.
  2. Sit in your front yard and sketch what you see in one point perspective.
  3. Sketch a hall scene from your house. Take a picture of it and draw it or sit at one end of the hall and draw it.
  4. Sketch a garden scene in one point perspective.

 

Resources

Graph Paper – Grid Paper

  1. Graph Paper Perspective. You can choose the size paper and how many inches you want the lines to be apart, etc. https://incompetech.com/graphpaper/perspective/
  2. Printable Paper.net. Free to print. One Point Perspective guide lines on paper
    Perspectivehttps://www.printablepaper.net/category/perspective

Written Step-by-Step with Images and Text

  1. http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/one-point-perspective-drawing
  2. C. Ibarra. “How to Create a Hallway With One Point Perspective:” https://snapguide.com/guides/create-a-hallway-with-one-point-perspective/
  3. Drawing Coach.com. “1 Point Perspective Drawing – Lesson 2 How to Draw a Circle:” http://www.drawingcoach.com/1-point-perspective.html
  4. Helen South.  “How to Draw One Point Perspective:” https://www.thoughtco.com/one-point-perspective-drawing-tutorial-1123412

Videos on You-Tube

  1. Fletcher Ceramics. “Easy 1 Point Perspective.” (brick building on a street)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFmek_sesfo
  2. Matt – Virtual Instructor. “One Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJYBMr5MKoo
  3. Melinda Nguyen “One Point Perspective – Streetscape:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phiEaRGBv-4
  4. Milton Kaynes You-tube Channel. “How To Draw A Room with One Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30tzJG6EOTo
  5. Otis Art Docents. “Lesson 5B – One Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twcFW0RyOO8
  6. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw 1-Point Perspective for Beginners: A Hallway:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ICyLN6I2cY
  7. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw a House in One-Point Perspective.”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i776k0zEzEc
  8. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw a Room in One-Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEymIyLbiAI
  9. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw Using One Point Perspective: (Railroad Track)” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRrKohWdpeQ

Thank you for reading my blog. I appreciate you very much. I’d love to hear from you.

Click comment below and scroll down to bottom of page to leave a comment.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

***************************************************

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join over 402 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

  1. Never Give Up image
  2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
  3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators

    Never Give Up
    Live with Enthusiasm
    Celebrate Each Step You Take

    Joan Y. Edwards
    Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

    ***************************************************

    Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join over 402 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

    1. Never Give Up image
    2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
    3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators

Never Give Up

Joan Y. Edwards

 

 

Haiku and Watercolor Fun


Wonderful Surprise at Barnes and Noble Book Signing


 

Signing Berdetta Culver's copy of Joan's Elder Care Guide

Signing Berdetta Culver’s copy of Joan’s Elder Care Guide

5-poster-with-my-picture-on-it

dscn9132

 

Oh my goodness! What a great book signing event we had on Saturday, February 25, 2017! Thanks to Barnes and Noble and The Charlotte Writers Club for providing the opportunity to take part in this Book Fair at the Arboretum store. It was over the top wonderful in every way! Thank you to the following people for coming by: Dy English, Lorrie York Hackett, Mollie York Chewning, Mark Chewning, Kylie Hackett, Luke Chewning, Wyatt Chewning, Janet Meyer-Jackman, Barbara Lunow, Dan Lunow, Janis Silverman, Richard Silverman, Jeff Dubrielle, and Patricia Duran.

First came, Dy English, an illustrator friend from The Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). Thank you, Dy.

Dy English and me

Dy English and me

Thank you to my daughters and their families, Lorrie Hackett, Mollie and Mark Chewning, Kylie Hackett, Luke and Wyatt Chewning for coming to my book signing. A few minutes after they came, I got a big surprise that brought tears of gladness to my eyes. My sister, Janet Meyer-Jackman flew down from Michigan to be there! So sweet! Everyone enjoyed keeping the secret!

janet-and-me

My Big Surprise – My sister, Janet Meyer-Jackman and me

kylie-lorrie-mollie-janet-me

Kylie Hackett, Lorrie Hackett, Mollie Chewning, Janet Meyer-Jackman, and me.

Front left to right: Luke Chewning and Wyatt Chewning Second Row, Joan, Mollie Chewning, Lorrie Hackett, Kylie Hackett Third Row,Barbara Lunow, Patricia Duran Fourth Row: Richard Silverman, Janis Silverman, Dan Lunow, Mark Chewning, Janet Meyer-Jackman Front left to right: Luke Chewning and Wyatt Chewning
Second Row, Joan, Mollie Chewning, Lorrie Hackett, Kylie Hackett
Third Row,Barbara Lunow, Patricia Duran
Fourth Row: Richard Silverman, Janis Silverman, Dan Lunow, Mark Chewning, Janet Meyer-Jackman

Mark and Mollie Chewning, Lorrie Hackett

Mark and Mollie Chewning, Lorrie Hackett

Luke Chewning and Maw Maw Joan

Luke Chewning and Maw Maw Joan

Here’s the way it went. Lorrie, Kylie, Mark, and Wyatt were sitting on the long bench in front of the magazine section. Mollie and Luke were standing in front of the magazines. I asked them what they’d been doing today. Mollie said, “We’ve been shopping.”

“What were you shopping for?” I asked.

Mollie said, “Turn around and see!”

There stood my sister, Janet Meyer-Jackman! Oh my goodness! Tears ran down my cheeks.

Video of my sister, Janet surprising me at the book signing!

Thank you to Jeff Dubreuil for coming. I hadn’t seen him in about 20 years. He and his sister are caring for their Mother. I am praying for them.

Jeff Dubreuil and me

Jeff Dubreuil and me

Thank you, Janis Silverman and Richard Silverman for coming. Janis was the leader of the writing group that helped me get Flip Flap Floodle in shape for publication. She let me know that my frog illustration needed work. She couldn’t tell that the frog was a frog!

Janis and Richard Silverman with me

Janis and Richard Silverman with me

Thank you to Barbara Lunow and Dan Lunow for coming. Barbara was in the Savvy Wordsmiths critique group in Fort Mill that closed down last year. I miss seeing them once a month.

Barbara and Dan Lunow with me

Barbara and Dan Lunow with me

Patricia Duran, thank you for coming and for helping me pack up my books and things and carrying them to my car. Patricia and I are movie friends who make each other laugh.

Patricia Duran and me

Patricia Duran and me

I was wound up, high in the clouds, feeling great!

When it came time for my reading, I was excited.

I am so thankful to God. There was a crowd of about 15-18 people watching and listening. Most sat in a semi-circle. Others stood to my left. I am thankful to Liz G. Williams and Ione O’Hara, two of the other authors at the book fair who listened to my readings. That was so sweet.

I read first from Joan’s Elder Care Guide encouraging caregivers to ask questions and to keep asking them until they get the answer they need. I told that it is very important to leave a plan that includes what the elder can and cannot do because it helps the substitute caregiver do a good job.

dscn9151

Afterwards, I read from Flip Flap Floodle. I planned to stop after Flip meets Mr. Bear, but I said, “One more page won’t hurt, right?”

dscn9159

Ione O’Hara said, “Show us the fox. We know he’s in there.”

So I showed them Mr. Fox who didn’t like Flip’s song and swallowed him whole. Flip was inside the Fox’s belly still playing his song. Flip’s Mother bopped Mr. Fox with her pocketbook and sprinkled pepper on his nose. Mr. Fox sneezed. Out flew Flip Flap Floodle still playing his song on his flute. Flip Flap Floodle, Floodle Floodle. Click here to hear me sing Flip’s song.

Thank you very much to Whitney Schuner, the Community Business Development Manager
Barnes & Noble-Arboretum. She did an outstanding job of organizing the Book Fair at the Barnes and Noble – Arboretum. All of us authors appreciate you.

Whitney Schuner, Community Business Development Manager Barnes & Noble-Arboretum

Whitney Schuner, Community Business Development Manager
Barnes & Noble-Arboretum

I sold 6 copies of Flip Flap Floodle and 5 copies of Joan’s Elder Care Guide. Thank you to all of you who came and a special thanks for purchasing my books and those by other authors! The event was such a success that Barnes and Noble and Charlotte Writers Club may agree to have an annual bookfair!

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

***************************************************

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join over 397 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

  1. Never Give Up image
  2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
  3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators

 

Merry Christmas to All!


 

Mary, Joseph, and the baby Jesus, Photo by Clarita at Morguefile.com

Mary, Joseph, and the baby Jesus, Photo by Clarita at Morguefile.com

“Merry Christmas to All” by Joan Y. Edwards

Merry Christmas to each of you. May God bless you and fill you with joy, peace, good health, and prosperity!

One day when I went to recycle boxes at a friend’s UPS store, he asked me how my Mother was doing. I told him that she wasn’t doing well. He said, “I will ask my God to bless her.”

That made me feel so special. So if you don’t believe in the same God, or believe the same religious beliefs as me, I want you to know that I wish good things for you. If there’s a good wish, you would like to hear, I hope you will interpret that I’m saying it in my words, “I wish all good things for you. Merry Christmas!

Here are songs I believe you will enjoy!

“Our Father” sung to comfort and bring healing to the people of Galacia, Spain after the train wreck in 2012.

The First Noel by Celtic Woman 

“Mary, Did You Know” sung by Clay Aiken

“Child of Peace” sung by Sandy Patty, lyrics by Lyn Hopkins

Thank you for reading my blog and leaving comments. You lift my spirits and give me joy.

If you have writing, illustrating, or never giving up topics that you would like for me to research and write about, please let me know in the comment area or email me at joanyedwards1@gmail.com!

In January, I plan to do a post every other day on “Why Not?” I may change the title but the meaning will be the same –  to encourage each of us to take that first step towards something we want to do or have been afraid to do.

 

Click on comment and scroll down to the bottom of the page.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

***************************************************

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join over 377 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

  1. Never Give Up image
  2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
  3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators

Contest to Win a Mentorship from Author or Agent of Picture Books – Sponsored by Tara Cattie Lubbe


Copyright Jami Gigot

Copyright © Jami Gigot

 

Contest to Win a Mentorship from Author or Agent of Picture Books – Sponsored by Tara Cattie Luebbe

Tara Cattie Luebbe’s announced a Writing with the Stars Mentor Contest January 13-midnight January 16 EDT, 2017. It is for authors and illustrators of picture books. To find out more about it, visit the following links:

  1. Jonell DeWitt’s Blog: Interview with New Author Tara Cattie Luebbe and Mentor Contest Announced
  2. Becky Shillington’s blog about Tara’s contest: Poetry Friday: Holiday Math Poetry and a New Contest for PB Writers
  3. Check out Tara’s website: Contest Details on Tara’s website 

Good luck to all who enter the contest.

Thanks Tara for paying it forward after Stacy McAnulty gave you a mentorship! Congratulations on landing an agent and a three-book contract!

Click on comment and scroll down to the bottom of the page.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

***************************************************

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join over 375 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

  1. Never Give Up image
  2. 20 Affirmations for Writers
  3. Ten Time Savers for Writers and Illustrators
%d bloggers like this: