7 Steps to Amazing Cover Letters


Copyright ©2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright ©2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“7 Steps to Amazing Cover Letters” by Joan Y. Edwards

A cover letter is not the same as a query letter. A query asks for permission to send a manuscript.

A cover letter encloses or attaches a manuscript along with it. Sometimes editors or agents request a chapter or a whole manuscript. Sometimes guidelines tell you to send your whole manuscript. If you’re attaching or enclosing a book manuscript or article, you need a cover letter to accompany it.  

When you write a cover letter,

  1. Address a certain person if possible.
  2. Make it only one page, business format, single-spaced, your name and address and date in right hand corner. The publisher name and editor or agency name and agent and address listed on left hand side.
  3. Lead off with the short selling pitch/blurb of 25 words or less for your manuscript. A pitch is an eye-catching, heart-trapping summary of your book or article. It can also be called your “Hook.” Ask your critique group or partner to help you formulate a good pitch. Write your pitch on a 3×5 card. If you can’t get it all written on the front side of the card, it’s too long. Here are articles about writing a pitch:
    1.  8 Steps to a Powerful Pitch:” https://www.writersstore.com/the-8-steps-to-a-powerful-pitch/.                                   
    2. A Selling Pitch Is Short with a Strong Emotional Tug:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/06/22/a-selling-pitch-is-short-with-a-strong-emotional-tug/
    3. “Write Your Pitch First:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/write-your-pitch-first/
    4. “How to Deliver a Short, Gutsy Pitch to Entice Editors, Agents, and Readers:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2011/09/15/how-to-deliver-a-short-gutsy-pitch-to-entice-editors-agents-and-readers/
  4. Tell why you and your book or illustrations are a good fit for this publisher or agent. Mention one book published by the editor or represented by the agent that is similar to yours and tell how your book would hook and attract readers to it.
  5. Give your publication credits. If you don’t have any, mention that you’re a member of SCBWI, or other literary group. SCBWI has a great reputation with publishers.
  6. Tell if this is an exclusive submission (only submitting to this editor or agent for three months or a simultaneous submission (more than one publisher or agent at a time).
  7. Call for action and thank you. Ask a question or proclaim a statement of why you want this particular publisher or agent to do. Thank them.

Editors
Will you publish my book?
I’d be honored if you’d consider publishing my book. Thank you for considering it.
I’d like for you to publish my book. Thank you for considering it.
Thank you for your considering the publication of my work.

Agents
Will you represent me as my agent?
I’d be honored if you’d consider being my agent.
I’d like for you to be my agent. Thanks for considering me.
Thank you for considering being my agent.

Here are three good sources for cover letters:

  1. Ginny Wiehardt. “Cover Letter Advice.”Fiction Writing.com http://fictionwriting.about.com/od/thebusinessofwriting/tp/coverslettershowto.htm
  2. Jimmy Sweeney. Quint Careers.com. “Effective cover Letter.” http://www.quintcareers.com/effective_cover-letter.html
  3. John Floyd. “Cover Me – I’m Going In!” http://www.writing-world.com/queries/floyd.shtml
  4. Moira Allen. “Cover Letters: When, How and Why to Use Them.” http://www.writing-world.com/queries/cover.shtml

Good luck with the publication of your writing and illustrating. Thank you for reading my blog. Please feel free to leave comments and ask questions.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

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To Market To Market Group for Bloggers, Writers, and Illustrators on Facebook


Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“To Market to Market Group for Bloggers, Writers, and Illustrators on Facebook” by Joan Y. Edwards

When I thought of creating a marketing group, the Mother Goose Nursery Rhyme kept popping into my head:

To market, to market to buy a fat pig,
Home again, home again, jiggety jig.
To market, to market to buy a fat hog.
Home again, home again, jiggety jog.

On Facebook, I created a “To Market to Market Group for Bloggers, Writers and Illustrators:” https://www.facebook.com/groups/tomarkettomarket/

The purpose of this group is to provide a place to advertise your blogs, books, and illustration portfolios and to meet other bloggers, writers, and illustrators. The idea is if each member shares one or more of our links in another social media, the word about us, our blogs, our books, and our illustrations will spread. Making connections with other writers and illustrators will help us and our work be better known so that those who might want to buy it, can find it and buy it with a smile.

If you want to join, send me an email to joanyedwards@carolina.rr.com or leave a comment below telling me your Facebook name and verify that you are a writer, illustrator, or blogger and that you would like to join the Facebook To Market To Market group.

Join To Market to Market to sell great books and awesome illustrations.
Use To Market to Market to share a great blog
Use To Market to Market to share questions and useful ideas for authors and illustrators

 

I created a Facebook page “To Market To Market Page for Bloggers, Writers, and Illustrators:” https://www.facebook.com/tomarkettomarketpagejoanyedwards.

Copyright ©2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright ©2015 Joan Y. Edwards

I would be honored if you click the like button there. Links posted on this page are automatically Tweeted to my Twitter account @tomarketsuccess. Please connect with me on Twitter @joanyedwards and/or @tomarketsuccess.

Have fun being you!

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

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Put One Space between Sentences


 

 

Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2015
Joan Y. Edwards

“Put One Space between Sentences” by Joan Y. Edwards

A few years ago, someone wrote, “Don’t put two spaces between sentences.”

I said, “What? This can’t be true. I have been trained for years to put two spaces when typing. Ever since 1954 in my high school typing class.”

However, it is true. We should only put one space between sentences now. My mother, Ethel D. Meyer, had the neatest saying about things that weren’t true any more. She said, “Old usedta’s dead.”

In 1989, Shushan and Wright said in the book, Desktop Publishing by Design, that “typesetting requires only one space after periods, question marks, exclamation points, and colons, and identified single sentence spacing as a typographic convention.

In 2010 The Chicago Manual of Style of the University of Chicago Press stated that one space be used between sentences. I put other sources that explain reasons for this in the reference section.

Most printed materials now use one space between sentences. Many publishers and agents expect manuscripts in one space between sentences format. Others may not. Follow their guidelines. If the guidelines don’t specify, I suggest that you use one-space formatting to show agents and publishers that you’re up to date!

Now you say to me, my Microsoft Word software puts two spaces between sentences. Here’s a link to directions for changing the settings from two spaces to one for Microsoft Word Software Versions 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003: http://word.tips.net/T001820_An_Automatic_Two_Spaces_after_a_Period.html

If you use Microsoft Word 2007 or higher you can set it for one space, and it will show you put a green wavy line where there are extra spaces.

  1. Click on the windows logo (red, blue, green, and yellow in the top left corner of a Word Document.
  2. Scroll down to bottom blue ribbon part and look over to right, click on Word Options
  3. Then click on the third word down,
  4. Then find the third subject title down: Checking Grammar and Style in Word. At the bottom of that section, it says: Writing Style. Click on Settings to right of the box beside it. Look for the Sentence spacing rule.
  5. There are three choices:
  • 1 (space)  Select 1, if you want Word’s grammar checker to mark as errors the sentences with more than one space after a period.
  • 2 (spaces)  Select 2, if you want Word’s grammar checker to mark as errors any sentences that have a single space or more than 2 spaces between sentences.
  • don’t check Select this option if you don’t want the Word’s grammar checker to check the spacing between sentences.

Choose the one you want, and click okay. Make sure you click okay or you’ll have to start all over again. Then Word marks incorrect spacing between sentences with a little green jagged line.

If my directions confuse you, go to http://wordribbon.tips.net/T010775_An_Automatic_Two_Spaces_after_a_Period.html.

I recommend subscribing to Allen Wyatt’s Word Tips. 

If per chance your editor wants two spaces and your manuscript has only one space between sentences, you can easily fix it. If you right click on the wavy green line, you can choose grammar, and it will show you how to change it to correct spacing.

If you click on the Review tab along the top blue ribbon bar at the top of Word, then choose Spelling and Grammar to the far left, it will let you know each sentence that the spacing is incorrect and if you click “change,” it will automatically fix it for you.

If you magnify your manuscript to size 16 font, you’ll be able to see the green wavy lines better.

References

 

Thank you for reading my blog. I appreciate you. You’re the greatest!

Have fun being you!
Never Give Up

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

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Interview with Kristina Stanley, Author of DESCENT, first of the Stone Mountain Mystery Series


Kristina Stanley, Author of

Kristina Stanley, Author of “Descent”

“Interview with Kristina Stanley, Author of DESCENT, first in the Stone Mountain Mystery Series”  by Joan Y. Edwards

Hello, Kristina. Thank you for joining me on my blog today.
You’re welcome, Joan. I can’t wait to meet the readers on your blog and tell them about my new book, Descent. I hope they’ll leave comments and ask questions.

I believe they will. Let’s get started.

  1. Where were you born?

Ottawa, but the real question is where did I grow up. By the time I finished high-school, I’d moved several times. Here’s the list: Ottawa, Boston, Kingston, Stockholm, Kingston, Stockholm, Ottawa, Saskatoon, Ottawa, Tokyo, Ottawa, Unteruhldingen, Ottawa, the Caribbean, Panorama, the Bahamas, Panorama. And on it goes, it hope.

  1. Where was your favorite place to live as a child? Why?

The family cottage. Since I moved so often, it was the one constant in my life. This is where I hung with my family and friends and could just be free to play.

  1. Where is your favorite place to live now? Why?

That’s a hard question. We’ve lived so many places and all have beautiful things about them. I’d have to say I like to live where I can be physically active outdoors each day.

  1. How did you do in English in high school?

I’m embarrassed to say, English was not my strong suit. I’m a math woman at heart. I have an honors degree in computer mathematics. Grammar in school used to drive me crazy!

  1. When did you decide to become an author?

Late one night in Unteruhldingen, Germany I was reading MOONLIGHT BECOMES YOU by Mary Higgins Clark. The opening—a woman trapped in a grave. Darkness and silence surround her, and she doesn’t know where she is. I can still see her fingers clawing at the edges of the coffin.

Tucked in my bed, I knew a driver would arrive at 4 a.m. to carry me to the Zurich airport for a flight to London, England. The sensible thing to do was sleep. But I couldn’t. I turned pages until the car arrived. I was exhausted, bleary eyed and excited. At that moment I knew I wanted to write something that forced a person to read and to forget about life for a while.

When I finally started my first novel, I’d been living in a ski resort for five years. Skiing is one of my passions and seemed the obvious topic.

  1. Who or what has been the most help and inspiration to you as a writer?

Joan Barfoot, author of EXIT LINES and many other books, was my mentor through the Humber School for Writers Creative Writing by Correspondence Post Graduate course. She taught me to pay attention to the craft of writing and not just the art.

Her advice: Learn how to use punctuation and grammar! You wouldn’t try to paint without knowing how to create colors by mixing them, would you? Or play the piano without practicing the scales? This advice stayed with me, and I often refer to Joan’s notes on that novel, reminding myself what she taught me.

  1. Tell me about the Series?

DESCENT occurs in winter. BLAZE follows in the spring with arson. AVALANCHE occurs the following winter and is about a theft, and yes, you guessed it, an avalanche.

The fourth in the series, which I haven’t named yet, takes place in the summer and a murder occurs during an ATV adventure. Of course, the who, what, where, when and why of the murder could change by the time I finish the novel. If you happen to have an idea for the title of the fourth novel that fits with the preceding three and is one word, comment below and let me know.

  1. What’s your favorite book? Why?

My answer my sound trite, but it’s usually the book I’m reading. I love reading every day. Mostly I read in the mystery genre, but I like fantasy, sci-fi and the paranormal, too. I like to read books by authors I have connection with and that will take me to any genre.

  1. Did you outline and plan your stories before you wrote them or did these stories develop on their own as you wrote them?

First I created the crime. For DESCENT, I was enjoying the sun at the cottage. Water lapped on the rocks. Wind kept the temperature cool. My mind wandered…How to kill a ski racer? I won’t give the answer, or I’d spoil the story, but I had the how of the crime. Once I know the crime, I like to build my cast of characters and work with them for a while. What would drive a balanced person to murder? How do the characters know each other? How did a relationship change from love to hate? These questions lead me through the plot.

If I knew up front how the story ended, I don’t think I’d be interested in writing it.

  1. How much research did you have to do for writing and/or publishing your books or manuscript in progress? What helped you in doing your research?

I spent almost six years as the director of human resources, guest services and security at an isolated ski resort in British Columbia. Much of my technical knowledge comes from this experience. The job gave me connections with the fire department and the RCMP which were very helpful with my research. The people I worked with at the ski resort still assist me with technical details about snow making, running lifts, etc. I think making the right connections has been the most helpful in my research.

  1. What has been the most exhilarating moment as a writer, so far?

This question made me think. I’ve had so many. I think the answer is when I submitted Avalanche to the Humber School for Writers Correspondence program. This was a big moment because I felt like I’d completed a novel, even though it was in draft form and not ready for public consumption. I think this was the moment I knew I was taking writing seriously.

  1. Did you have trouble saying goodbye to your characters once the book was finished?

This is an easy one. I write the Stone Mountain Mystery series, so I don’t have to say goodbye to a character if I don’t want too. They can live on in the next book.

  1. What is your favorite genre? Why?

Mystery, I love a mystery. I’m not a big fan of too much violence, so I love books where there is a crime, but most of the story is about finding the villain.

  1. What’s your favorite book you’ve written? Why?

Avalanche. I wrote it first, even though it is the third in the series, so it’s my “baby”.

  1. What are 5 things a writer should check when revising a manuscript?
  • spelling and grammar – without this, you may lose readers.
  • entry and exit points for each scene. Are you in control of how you get in and out of scenes and do you do this in a variety of way?
  • what is the point of a scene – this is an important question to ask yourself for each scene. If you don’t know the point, then maybe delete the scene.
  • empty stage – are your characters just talking and the reader doesn’t know anything about where they are.
  • point of view – who has the point of view and do you stay consistent throughout a scene.
  1. How did you know your manuscript was ready for submission to an editor or agent?

After finishing the Humber School for Writers correspondence course, I wasn’t ready. After the summer workshop, Mary Gaitskill supported me in a submission to an agent. I think the answer is to get an opinion or two from a professional to help guide you.

  1. Which publisher or agent did you choose for your manuscripts? How did you find your publisher or agent?

I found my publisher, Imajin Books, by reading a novel by Cheryl Kaye Tardif. Her style is similar to mine, so I checked to see who her publisher was. As it turned out, Cheryl is the CEO of Imajin Books. I waited until Imajin Books was open for submissions and sent in my work. I followed the guidelines carefully and had my work submitted seconds after the opening time.

  1. Which blog posts do you have the most fun writing?

The posts I have the most fun writing are Farley’s Friday. I look for humorous days in my dog’s life to write stories from his point of view. I love writing from Farley’s point of view.  Here’s one: http://kristinastanley.com/2015/07/24/farleys-friday-where-can-a-dog-go-shopping/


Kristina Stanley was the director of security at an isolated resort in the depths of the Purcell Mountains, British Columbia. Her time in that job and her love of skiing led her to write the Stone Mountain Mystery series.

Her books have garnered the attention of prestigious crime writing organizations in Canada and England. Crime Writers of Canada nominated DESCENT (July 2015, Imajin Books) for the Unhanged Arthur award for the best unpublished crime novel. The Crime Writers’ Association nominated BLAZE for the Debut Dagger (to be published fall 2015, Imajin Books).

Purchase DESCENT as an E-book or paperback on Amazon in many countries.

The following link will take you to the Amazon in your geographic area: Kristina Stanley’s book/DESCENT  http://www.amazon.com/Descent-Stone-Mountain-Mystery-Book-ebook/dp/B01053N6CA/ref=sr_1_1?tag=geolinker-20&s=books

USA http://www.amazon.com/Descent-Stone-Mountain-Mystery-1/dp/1772230952
Canada http://www.amazon.ca/Descent-Stone-Mountain-Mystery-Book-ebook/dp/B01053N6CA/

Connect with Kristina on Social Media:
Website https://www.KristinaStanley.com
Blog: http://kristinastanley.com/blog/
Facebook Author Page https://www.facebook.com/KristinaStanley.Author
Twitter @StanleyKMS
Google-Plus https://plus.google.com/111458890141744842203/posts?hl=en
Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/stanleykms/
Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14130411.Kristina_Stanley
Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/home?trk=nav_responsive_tab_home

Thank you, Kristina Stanley for being a guest on my blog. It is an honor to have you here.

Thank you to all of you out there in Blogland for reading my blog. Please leave comments or questions for Kristina or for me. We would love to hear from you.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

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Sandra Warren Won a Free Critique of a Query Letter


Sandra Warren Is a Winner Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Sandra Warren Is a Winner Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“Sandra Warren Won a Free Critique of a Query Letter”

Thank you to all the people who read my blog post, Take These Steps before You Sign with an Agent. I especially appreciate the six people below who left comments before midnight Saturday, August 8, 2015. I put their names in a hat for a chance to win a free critique of a query letter to an agent.

  1. Sandra Warren
  2. Sharon Willett
  3. Linda Martin Andersen
  4. Janis Silverman
  5. Carol Baldwin
  6. Judy Pierce

Random.org chose #1. Therefore, Sandra Warren, you won a free critique of a query letter! Congratulations!

Sandra, please send your query letter, pitch, and story summary to joanyedwards1@gmail.com.  The pitch and story summary are not essential, but will help me give you suggestions for your query letter.

If you are a writer, write.
If you are an illustrator, illustrate.
Whatever your task is, enjoy it.
Celebrate you.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

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Lynn Harris Won an Interview on My Blog and a 15-Minute Phone Call


Lynn Harris Is a Winner Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Lynn Harris Is a Winner Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“Lynn Harris Won an Interview on My Blog and a 15-Minute Phone Call”

Dear Readers,
There were 10 people who left a comment before July 31, 2015.
1. Widdershins
2. Lu Ann Cooley
3. Sandra Warren
4. Linda Martin Andersen
5. Martha Robinson
6. Sue Scarella
7. Carol Baldwin
8. Kristina Stanley
9. June Phyllis Baker
10. Lynn Harris

I had Random.org to choose a number between 1 and 10. It chose number 10 which means that Lynn Harris, you won a blog post about you and your writing or illustrating highlighting ten writing or illustrating tips that have helped you the most.  I’ll also give you a 15 minute phone call in the United States consultation on: blogging, writing, or submitting, If you happen to live outside the USA, I’ll Skype you for 15 minutes. You can email me 15 questions ahead of time so we can make the best use of your fifteen minutes. Congratulations, Lynn.

Thank you to everyone for reading my blog and for leaving comments.

Never Give Up
Joan

 

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Take These Steps before You Sign with an Agent


Before You Sign with an Agent Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

Before You Sign with an Agent Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

“Take These Steps before You Sign with an Agent” by Joan Y. Edwards

Linda Andersen, a member of my PubSubbers Yahoo Group,  asked me to write a blog about the steps to get an agent. She asked, “Why should a writer get an agent?” When a writer has a good, respected, dependable agent, it opens up more opportunities for the writer’s work to get published. Many publishers do not accept work from writers they do not know or were not recommended to them. However, these same publishers will accept work from agented writers.

A query is not the same as a letter that accompanies a manuscript submission. A query is only a letter giving the pitch and asking for permission to submit a manuscript to see if an agent would be interested in representing the author with publishers.

Before you query an agent, do the following:

  1. Make sure you have a completed quality manuscript that has been critiqued and proofed. Follow the PubSubbers plan to help you in detail. Pub Subbers, Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, and Week 4.
  2. Hollywood Script Express suggests that you give your screenplay to a friend or relative and ask them to read it in one sitting. If they can’t finish your screenplay in less than 2 hours, you probably need to trim some fat.
  3. Do Your Homework. Research to find out information to prove the agent/manager is the right one for you. Find three agents who meet your needs and they represent writers/illustrators in the areas where your manuscript fits. says it’s a good idea to make a list and rank them according to which ones meet your criteria best. Here are places I recommend that you look:
  4. Check the Agent’s website and current submission guidelines. Chuck Sambuchino also says, “Research the agent’s website to confirm that he is indeed still seeking “electronic queries for romance novels,” etc. Also, remember the frustratingly sad reality that the publishing industry is constantly in flux. Agents quit; they switch agencies; they suddenly stop representing fiction and move completely to nonfiction.
  5. Before you query the prospective agents on your preferred list, find out which authors/illustrators he represents and how many books he’s sold in the last three years and the last six months. If this information isn’t on the Agency website, ask for it.
  6. Follow the Guidelines. Follow the Guidelines. Follow the Guidelines.
  7. Write a great simple query letter. Chuck Sambuchino says that if you don’t have a good opening for your query, give the facts: “I am seeking literary representation for my 75,000-word completed thriller, titled Dead Cat Bounce.” Sambuchino says to follow opener with the pitch and a little biographical information.

Before You Sign on the Line, Ask Questions. Get answers.

  1. Take 3 days to consider the agent’s offer. Sarah Ockler suggests that you take a few days to think things over and prepare your questions before accepting representation from an agent. I know you’ll be so excited to get the offer. BE SMART. BE WISE. Get all the facts before you sign. Research and ask questions. Then honor your gut feeling
  2. What are the names, email addresses, and phone numbers of three of their signed authors/illustrators? You’ll want to ask them a few questions. As Michael Hyatt like President Reagan says to “Trust, but Verify.” He says, “If possible, talk with the agents clients on the phone. People will tell you things on a phone call that they will not put in writing.”
  3. What are your fees? How often will I receive my earnings? Before you sign, find out what fees they charge and how and how often you’ll receive your earnings. Sarah Ockler says that most agents take the standard 15% fee from the monies earned from your books. Publishers send your advance and royalty money to the agency; the agency sends you a check less their 15%. Are there hidden fees? If there are charges for mailing? Printing letters? Then these are probably not sure-fire agents. They might be a service similar to Writer’s Relief, a fee-based author’s submission service – not a literary agency.
  4. Do you have time for me? Felice Prager says to ask, “How many other clients do you represent? Do you plan on expanding or will this number stay about the same? Will you or another member of your staff be handling my work?” You want an agent that doesn’t have such a large number of clients that he doesn’t have time for you.
  5. What makes you the right agent for me? How do you see my career? Wendy Lawton says to ask, “What will you offer that other agencies don’t?”
  6. How can I tell you’ve submitted my manuscript to a publisher?  Will I receive copies of the submissions? Will you let me know each time you’ve talked with a publisher? Wendy Lawton says to ask: How often will we be in contact?
  7. What is your preferred form of communication? Wendy Lawton says to ask:  “How do you like to communicate? Email? Phone? If you like to talk on the phone and an agent prefers emails, then you might have a problem.” Remember to organize your questions so that your agent doesn’t receive 3 or 4 emails from you in one day. When a person gets overwhelmed with too many emails or too many phone calls, it hurts the communication lines.

While you are pondering all of these questions, you will probably think of others. Victoria Strauss gives many great links to posts with more questions about agents at “Questions to Ask Your Prospective Literary Agent:

References:

  1. Chuck Sambuchino. “10 Submission Tips for Querying an Agenthttp://www.writersdigest.com/writing-articles/by-writing-goal/get-published-sell-my-work/10-submission-tips-for-querying-an-agent
  2. Felice Prager. “Ten Questions to Ask an Agent before You Sign:” http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/10-questions-to-ask-an-agent-before-you-sign
  3. “What Every Fiction Writer Should Do Before Submitting A Book to an Agent:” http://www.writersdigest.com/tip-of-the-day/what-every-fiction-writer-should-do-before-submitting-a-book-to-an-agent
  4. Hollywood Script Express. “How to Get a Screenplay Agent:” http://www.hollywoodscriptexpress.com/how_to_get_screenplay_agent.html
  5. Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, & Literary Agents. (E-book is less expensive than the paperback. You can copy and paste links and click on them.)
  6. Joan Y. Edwards. “22 Literary Agents Who Are Looking for You:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2013/09/06/22-literary-agents-who-are-looking-for-you/
  7. Michael Hyatt. “Before You Hire a Literary Agent:”
    http://michaelhyatt.com/before-you-hire-a-literary-agent.html
  8. Preditors and Editors – Agents and Lawyers
  9. Pub Subbers, Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, and Week 4.
  10. Query Tracker.com has information about agents.
  11. Sarah Ockler. “Literary Agent Offers: Don’t Settle:” http://sarahockler.com/2008/07/05/literary-agent-offers-dont-settle/
  12. Scripts and Scribes. Listing of Agents and Managers for Books and Screenplays. http://www.scriptsandscribes.com/agentsmanagers/.
  13. Victoria Strauss. “Questions to Ask Your Prospective Literary Agent:” http://www.victoriastrauss.com/2014/02/26/questions-to-ask-your-prospective-literary-agent/  (This has many great links to posts that will help you find more questions to ask an agent.)
  14. Wendy Lawton. “25 Questions to Ask Your Potential Agent:”
    http://www.booksandsuch.com/blog/questions-to-ask-your-potential-agent/

To have a chance to win a free critique of a query letter to an agent, please leave a comment on this blog post between now and midnight Saturday, August 8, 2015. Random.org will choose the winner. I will upload a new post to announce the winner on Sunday, August 9, 2015.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2015 Joan Y. Edwards

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