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You Are Patient


You Are PatientCopyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

“You Are Patient” by Joan Y. Edwards

Say Good Things February-Copyright 2016 Joan Y. Edwards

 

 

 

This is Day 16 of my series “Say Good Things February.”

 Are you patient? My answer to you follows:

You are patient. You make good use of the time you spend waiting. You are comfortable and relaxed during delays. You are calm while waiting.  You persevere in short delays and long delays. Your blood pressure stays normal under the strain of long-term delays. You are even-tempered. You calmly endure trying situations. Your patience helps you deflate and deflect your anger. You practice patience skillfully and willingly.  You have a great sense of security. You feel included and a part of your family. You have many friends. You feel a part of your community, church, school, and workplace. You realize that what you want is worth the wait. You know that at the end of my waiting time, you will get what you want.

Repeat these statements with “I” rather than “You” to make them true affirmations for you.

I am patient. I make good use of the time I spend waiting. I am comfortable and relaxed during delays. I am calm while waiting. I persevere in short delays and long delays. My blood pressure stays normal under the strain of short and long-term delays. I am even-tempered. I calmly endure trying situations. My patience helps me deflate and deflect my anger. I practice patience skillfully and willingly. I have a great sense of security. I feel included and a part of my family. I have many friends. I feel a part of my community, church, school, and workplace. I realize that what you want is worth the wait. I know that at the end of my waiting time, I will get what I want.

Here are four resources I used in writing this post:

  1. Anuj Magazine. “Can the Personality Trait of ‘Patience’ be determined using someone’s handwriting?”
    http://thehandwritinganalyst.blogspot.com/2010/05/can-personality-trait-of-patience-be.html
  2. The Free Dictionary. “Definition of Patience:” http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Patience+(character+trait)
  3. The Daily Minder. “How to Become More Patient with Friends, Enemies, & Circumstances:” http://www.thedailymind.com/how-to/how-to-become-more-patient-with-friends-enemies-circumstances/
  4. Barry. “Impatience:” http://personalityspirituality.net/articles/the-michael-teachings/chief-features/impatience/

I discovered after I kept saying these things over and over again for days, weeks, and months, the ones I believed became true. They became my reality.

Being patient, doesn’t mean to refrain from acting properly in certain situations. If a worker is late for work every day for a week, you need to confront him about this. It’s not good to let him get by with this behavior. Don’t wait until you’re steaming out of your ears and have flames shooting out of your mouth. Hold people accountable for their actions. Make sure you’ve laid out the rules. Be calmly assertive.

On the one hand, it’s good to be patient. On the other hand, it’s not good to be too patient and not honor your feelings or not take action when it is essential for life, job, and safety. It doesn’t mean to wait for ten hours for someone to show up for supper. Mother gave me great advice when I was a teenager. She said, “If you have a date and he is over an hour and a half late and hasn’t called you, go somewhere. Don’t wait for him.”

It doesn’t mean that if there’s a waiting line at a restaurant for an hour, that you wait. It depends upon your feelings about this situation. If it’s worthwhile to you and those with you, wait. But do something productive while you wait. Talk to those with you. If you’re by yourself, there are iPhones, smart phones, iPads, iPods, books, magazines. Read a book while you wait. Play a game. Call a friend. Send an email. Your gut feeling will tell you what to do. If you’re getting angry, do something different. Go to a different restaurant, buy take-out and take it home and eat it.

If you’re caught in traffic…it’s a little more difficult. Think about as many pleasant things as you can. One summer I worked clear across town and had to come home about 20 miles to my house. I hated the traffic. It made me nervous. I decided to bring an apple with me. If I could chomp on the apple, it would help me calm down. One day I brought two apples. Sometimes I’d sing a song.

As a writer and illustrator, you need patience to stop and start on projects, to wait for answers from people who are critiquing your work, from editors and agents. Set aside a certain amount of time and then go forward.

You know what things make your impatience flair up. Brainstorm ways to think about the situation so it doesn’t make you angry.

Barry, a psychologist, says that many people who are impatient felt left out as a child. That’s why I put the affirmations about belonging and feeling included.

When you have trouble mastering a positive affirmation, you may discover, like me, that a  voice in your head keeps saying the opposite belief. This voice becomes very big at times. It may even shout at you and sell you on the idea that you’re not capable of doing what you declare. If this happens to you, you may need more of God’s help to believe in all facets of patience or talk with a good friend who may point out that you have these qualities that you don’t know you have.

If you keep saying the positive affirmations, study new ways to make yourself more patient, and put them into action, your subconscious mind will lead you to make it true. Believe it’s possible. You must believe it’s true. Believe in you. Love yourself. Love your qualities as a patient person.

I hope that you find that using affirmations gives you a stronger belief in you, your skills, abilities, and positive experiences. Thanks for reading my blog. I hope you’ll share the post with others. Please feel free to ask questions and tell me stories about being patient in the comment area. I’d love to hear from you!

To leave a comment, click here and scroll down.

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2016 Joan Y. Edwards
www.joanyedwards.com (Gospel-related puzzles and skits)

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9 Responses

  1. Joan, this post reminds me of the quote, “Patience is a virtue.” Most of us face many opportunities where we can build patience. Some are more up to the challenge than others. I find that it requires much patience to be a caregiver or to deal with our own medical needs. Your advice to do something productive while you wait is a great coping strategy. Well done.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Linda,
      Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment. I believe patience is a virtue, too. To survive in our world, I believe you need patience. You’re right, caregivers need an extra ounce of patience. When we find ourselves in the middle of our own medical crisis or other type of crisis, we need patience. Without patience, you carry around extra bags filled with anger! Much too heavy for a daily basis. Good luck. May you have an abundance of the patience you need!

      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Liked by 2 people

      • Aaaah, patience. It is the grace we give others and ourselves not forgetting that there are circumstances beyond our control. This past New Year’s Eve, I resolved to be more patient. But my sister-in-law said that I was already very patient! Funny. joan.reid@yahoo.com

        Liked by 1 person

        • Dear Joan Reid,
          Thanks for writing. You’re right. Patience is a gift we give ourselves and others. It is indeed easier to do when we remember that most of the time circumstances are beyond our control. Isn’t it interesting when others view us as better than our own perceptions. I’m so glad your sister-in-law told you that you were already patient. So perhaps you are trying to get more patience with yourself. It’s okay. We can always use more patience.

          Never Give Up
          Joan

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Good to be reminded and to say this to ourselves. You’re essays have been wonderful all month!
    Joan Reid

    Like

    • CORRECTED!: Good to be reminded and to say this to ourselves. Your essays have been wonderful all month!
      Joan Reid

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dear Joan Reid,
        Thank you for taking the time to write. I appreciate you and your comments. You’re right. It is good to be reminded to say good things to ourselves and believe good things about ourselves. Each step we take helps us improve and survive a little longer.

        Never Give Up
        Joan

        Like

  3. Joan, your mom gave you great advice 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Kathleen,
      Thank you for writing. I remembered and used Mother’s advice about when someone was late for a date quite a few times. I believe it was good advice, too. 🙂

      Believe in you
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

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