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Interview with Picture Book and Chapter Book Author, Becky Shillington


Copyright © 2013 Becky Shillington

Copyright © 2013 Becky Shillington

“Interview with Picture Book and Chapter Book Author, Becky Shillington” by Joan Y. Edwards

Hello, Becky. Thank you for being a guest on my blog.

I am glad to be here.  I have lots to tell you.

Let’s begin. Everyone’s curious to find out all about you.

1. How did you do in English as a kid?

Growing up, language arts was always my favorite subject. In my eighth grade language arts class, I was the only kid who got excited about diagramming sentences, and in high school I actually looked forward to writing really long papers. I went on to major in English in college, and I always saved the homework from those classes as a “reward” for finishing everything else. Words, books, and writing have always fascinated me.

2.  When did you decide to become an author?

My first publication was a poem in the local newspaper in second grade. But I started making up and writing stories much earlier, probably around kindergarten. I knew very young that I wanted to write books one day.

3.  What’s your favorite book? Why?

I don’t think I can answer that fairly…there are so many books that I love! As a child, I enjoyed reading books by Laura Ingalls Wilder, Judy Blume, and Beverly Cleary, among others. As I grew older I fell in love with the classics, and this continued into college. As an adult, I read children’s and adult fiction constantly. That being said, my all-time favorite book is probably PRIDE AND PREJUDICE.

4.  Are your characters based on real people or events from your life?

None of my characters are specifically modeled after people I know, but I do sometimes use bits and pieces of real people in my writing. The main character in one of my picture book manuscripts was inspired by a little girl at Barnes & Noble who was wearing red cowboy boots and a cowboy hat. I overheard a little boy teasing her, saying, “Girls can’t be cowboys!” in a scoffing, dismissive manner. She immediately answered him with, “Yes they can!” and then turned around and picked a book off the display wall. At that moment, a character was born; I knew her name was Josie, that she wanted to be a cowgirl more than anything in the world, and that I needed to write a book about her!

5.  Do you outline and plan your books before you write them or do your stories flow on their own?

For my picture books I always have a rough plan, but I try to let each story grow organically to see where it goes. With my chapter books, I write up a short outline of what I think is going to happen chapter by chapter, but this often changes with the growth of the characters.

6.  What is your favorite genre?

To write: humor. To read: it’s a tie between humor and historical fiction. I have a historical fiction middle grade novel on the back burner, but I still have a lot of research to do and other projects are taking up my time right now. One day I hope to finish it!

7.  What is the most essential component of a good book?  How can we improve this component in our writing?

To me, a distinctive voice is the most essential component of a good book. If the voice is weak, a book won’t hold my attention (while reading or writing), no matter how great the story line is. The three main purposes of a distinctive voice are:

  • To draw readers into the story.
  • To enable readers to get to know the main character(s).
  • To give the story’s plot a vehicle through which to come alive.

To improve in this area:

  • READ books in the genre in which you are writing. Pick apart those books to see what works and what doesn’t work where voice is concerned. (I have re-read the same page over and over and over again doing this.)
  • Keep an “idea file” with profiles and personalities of possible characters in it. Write down interesting bits and pieces of conversations you overhear, or situations you observe. Each person has a unique way of dealing with life, and your characters should reflect this.
  • Get to know your main character and pay special attention to the authenticity of his or her voice. For example, would an eight-year-old little boy be more likely to say “Bob and I went to the movies,” or would “me and Bob went to the movies” be more likely to come out of his mouth? If the answer is “Bob and I,” by all means have your MC use the correct grammar. But if you know that your MC would be much more likely to say “me and Bob,” then give him permission to use incorrect grammar. I remember the controversy over Barbara Park’s Junie B. Jones books several years ago, and hearing  parents and teachers say they wouldn’t let their children read those books because of Junie B.’s poor grammar. But, if Junie B. spoke correctly all the time, her voice would be completely different—and she wouldn’t BE Junie B.! Yes, I think there is a time and a place for correct grammar (if there were really “Grammar Police,” I would be the first to sign up!), but in the realm of fiction, there is wiggle room for digressions from the accepted norm.

8.  Becky, you are awesome at creating characters that are believable, unforgettable, and witty. How do you create your characters?

I always have a strong mental image of my main character before I start writing, of both her physical appearance and her personality. By the time I start writing a story, the character is almost real and has a LOT to say. Sometimes I even “interview” my main characters, and I always know random facts about them that will never appear in the books!

9. How do you know when your manuscript is ready for submission?

I get it into the best shape that I can, and then I let it sit a loooong time. Then I edit it again and send it to my online critique group, and/or take it to my in-person critique group. Most of the time, I will also give it to a writer friend to look over. After I’ve received feedback, I read the manuscript again with a critical eye and make any necessary changes. I usually let it sit awhile again before I submit it. No matter how long I wait, I can always find something to improve upon after a manuscript has “percolated” awhile.

10. Becky, you are great at poetry. Which kind of poetry do you like best?

I love all kinds of poetry, but my current favorite is the haiku format. I love how so much can be said in so few words; it’s like looking through the zoom lens on a camera. Here is a haiku I wrote earlier this winter, and a picture of the tree that inspired it:

Copyright © 2013 Becky Shillington

Copyright © 2013 Becky Shillington

Winter Silhouette

 Bare branches reach up,

Fingers brushing a blue sky

So bright that I squint.

11.  Who or what has been the most helpful to you as a writer?

Without a doubt, my writer friends. I have several close friends who have been with me on every step of my journey, and who continue to cheer me on. Writing is such a personal business, and at some point you have to grow thick skin. But while you’re growing it, it is essential to have writer friends who understand the ups and downs of what you are trying to accomplish, and who can pick you up after setbacks and disappointments.

12.  What are you working on now?

I am substantially revising one chapter book, writing another, and doing a detailed re-write of a picture book.

13.  What online writing resources have you found helpful?

My favorite writing resource is the online community known for years as “Verla Kay’s Blueboards (Those who are not members of SCBWI can register here).” This past fall the SCBWI teamed up with Verla Kay, so now the community is officially the “SCBWI Blueboards,” but the people, the spirit, and the wealth of information are all the same. You can find information on ANY aspect of children’s publishing on the Blueboards—and if you don’t find what you are looking for, you can post questions and get answers very quickly. (Children’s writers and illustrators are such a helpful, supportive group of people!) You do not have to be a member of SCBWI to access to the Blueboards, but members are granted access to “members only” sections of the board. You can visit the Blueboards here: http://www.scbwi.org/boards/

Becky Shillington on the web:

Blog: www.beckyshillington.blogspot.com
Twitter: @BeckyinSC

Thank you, Becky for being a guest on my blog and sharing your Haiku poem and teaching us how we can improve the voice of each character in our stories. Good luck with getting your work published. I hope you find the right publisher this year for your stories.

***********************************************************************************************

Thank you for reading my blog. I hope you’ll leave a comment for Becky. She would love to hear from you.

Celebrate you every day.
You are a gift to our world
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with information to inspire, motivate, and help you to believe in yourself and your writing.

*********************************************************************

This interview with Becky Shillington is part of the Authors I Admire Series:

  1. 4RV Publishing – Vivian Zabel. “Vivian Zabel and 4RV Publishing:”  https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2011/08/21/interview-with-vivian-zabel-and-4rv-publishing/
  2. Ann Eisenstein. “Catch the Great Dialogue of Amazon Best-Selling
    Author, Ann Eisenstein:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2013/12/13/catch-the-great-dialogue-of-amazon-best-selling-author-ann-eisenstein/
  3. Bob Rich, PhD. “Interview with Dr. Bob Rich: Writer, Mudsmith, Psychologist, and Editor:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/interview-with-dr-bob-rich-writer-mudsmith-psychologist-and-editor/
  4. Carol Baldwin. “Interview and Amazing Facts about Teacher and Author, Carol Baldwin:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/01/06/interview-and-amazing-facts-about-teacher-and-author-carol-baldwin/
  5. Gretchen Griffith. “Interview with Gretchn Griffith, Versatile and Talented  Author of Books for Children and Adults:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/02/03/interview-with-gretchen-griffith-versatile-and-talented-author-of-books-for-children-and-adults/
  6. Jeff Herman. “My Interview of Jeff Herman:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2011/01/11/my-interview-of-jeff-herman/
  7. Joy Acey. “Joy Acey Says Pub Sub Works (PubSub3rdFri):” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2010/12/01/joy-acey-says-pub-sub-works-pubsub3rdfri/
  8. Juliana Jones. “Top Ten Reasons I Love Being a Part of PubSub3rdFriday! by Juliana Jones:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/10/01/top-ten-reasons-i-love-being-a-part-of-pubsub3rdfriday-by-juliana-jones/
  9. Karen Cioffi-Ventrice. “Interview with Karen Cioffi-Ventrice – Writing and Marketing Guru:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/01/27/interview-with-karen-cioffi-ventrice-writing-and-marketing-guru/
  10. Linda Martin Andersen. “Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2011/01/30/linda-andersen-is-proof-that-pubsub3rdfri-works/
  11. Linda Martin Andersen. “What Entices You to Submit Your Writing:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/02/01/what-entices-you-to-submit-your-writing-by-linda-andersen-guest-blogger-pubsub3rdfri/
  12. Joyce Moyer Hostetter. “Interview with Joyce Moyer Hostetter – Award Winning Historical Fiction Writer:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/01/29/interview-with-joyce-moyer-hostetter-award-winning-historical-fiction-writer/
  13. Margaret Fieland “Interview with Intriguing Sci-Fi Author and Editor, Margaret Fieland:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/01/16/interview-with-intriguing-sci-fi-author-and-editor-margaret-fieland/
  14. Maureen Wartski. “In Memoriam: Interview with Maureen Wartski, Artist, Author, and Friend:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/01/20/in-memoriam-interview-with-maureen-wartski-artist-author-and-friend/
  15. Megan Vance. “Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author Megan Vance:”
    https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2013/12/16/interview-and-great-writing-tips-from-author-megan-vance/
  16. Nicole Thompson-Andrews. “Nicole Thompson-Andrews Loves Pub Subbing:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/05/01/nicole-thompson-andrews-loves-pub-subbing/
  17. Samantha Bell. “An Interview with Samantha Bell – Impressive and Talented Author and Illustrator:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/01/23/an-interview-with-samantha-bell-impressive-and-talented-author-and-illustrator/
  18. Sandra Warren. “Fascinating Ideas and Advice from Sandra Warren, Author:” https://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2013/12/06/fascinating-ideas-and-advice-from-sandra-warren-author/
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25 Responses

  1. Becky, Thanks for coming over and sharing your story. I totally agree that my friends are the most important asset to me too. The writing community is so giving.

    Like

    • Dear Mona,
      Thanks for writing. You and Becky are right. Friends are very important in helping our writing. I appreciate your being a loyal follower of my blog. It’s very thoughtful of you to leave a comment. It shows how we are all interconnected.

      Celebrate you
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

    • Thank you, Mona! I really don’t know what I’d do without my writer friends–they are truly priceless!

      Like

  2. Becky,
    Thanks for sharing your background, your work and your ideas about writing. I enjoyed meeting you at SCBWIC last Fall and really enjoyed getting to know you better via this interview. Thank you also for mentioning Blueboards. I’ll check it out.

    Wishing you much success with your current projects.

    Like

    • Dear Sandra,
      Thanks for leaving a comment for Becky. When her books are published, you will love meeting her characters. Becky is right. You will learn a lot from reading Blueboards.
      Celebrate you.
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

    • Thanks, Sandra! I enjoyed meeting you, too, and I love ARLIE! = ) Definitely check out the Blueboards!

      Like

  3. WOW!!! What a fantastic, detailed interview. Wonderful, insightful questions and answers with oodles of information. Becky, I love that you interview your “main” characters. Thanks for asking that question, Joan. Thank you Becky and Joan for a great piece of inspiration to begin my day!!!

    Like

    • Dear Karen,
      Thank you for writing. You’re welcome for the interview. I am honored that Becky agreed to be a guest. I’m glad that Becky’s technique of interviewing her characters appeals to you. I’ve done it, too. It’s fun. I hope you try it. You are right. She shared oodles of information!

      Celebrate you.
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

    • Thank you, Karen! = )

      Like

  4. Great interview!!! Lovely pictures and poem!!! I enjoyed meeting you last year and look forward to our paths crossing even more frequently.

    Like

    • Dear Vijaya,
      Thanks for writing.I’m glad you enjoyed Becky’s pictures and her poem. It was fun meeting you at the SCBWI-Carolinas conference in September. Becky is going to be so happy to hear from you.

      Celebrate you
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

    • Thanks, Vijaya! The more writers I meet, the more I appreciate our SCBWI connection. I have met so many wonderful people! Hope to see you again this year! = )

      Like

  5. Becky and Joan – I really appreciated the questions and responses in the interview. Becky’s comments and suggested writing improvements, as always, are spot-on and so helpful.
    The added information on Blueboards – – – and interviewing your characters – OMGosh – how cool is that!
    Thank you, ladies – so enjoyed the blog today.

    Like

    • Thanks, Claire! = )

      Like

    • Dear Claire,
      Thank you for writing. You are right. Becky’s suggestions for writing improvements are very helpful and right on-target.

      Celebrate you.
      Never Give Up
      Joan Y. Edwards

      Like

  6. Great interview. Thanks for sharing all this good information. I also love the Haiku form.

    Like

    • Dear Rosi,
      Thanks for writing. I am glad you liked Becky’s interview. She iis sweet to share all her amazing writing tips. It’s great that you love her Haiku poem.

      Celebrate you.
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

  7. Becky,
    I admire people who can write humor well. That’s a special gift! I wish you well with all your projects. I love haiku too. Thanks for sharing one of yours.

    Joan,
    Thanks for another interesting interview. It’s obvious that you especially like Becky’s character development in her writing. What a nice compliment.

    Like

    • Dear Linda,
      Thanks for stopping by. You’re welcome for the interview with Becky. You are right. I do especially like Becky’s character development. Her characters are so funny. She has a special knack for it. I’m glad she share some of her secrets with us. Thanks for being a loyal follower of my blog and leaving encouraging comments. I appreciate you.

      Celebrate you.
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

  8. Great interview! Like Linda, I also admire people who can write humor well. I love reading books that can make me laugh out loud! And your cowgirl story sounds fantastic!

    Like

    • Dear Leandra,
      Thank you for writing. Glad you liked Becky’s interview. It’s great that both you and Linda love books that make you laugh out loud. You’re right, Becky’s cowgirl seems to have that “make you laugh out loud” quality. I can’t wait for her stories to be published!

      Celebrate you.
      Never Give Up
      Joan Y. Edwards

      Like

  9. Another outstanding interview, Joan! Becky, you have to be the only person I know that got excited about diagramming sentences! Thank you for sharing your writing life with us. I love your haiku! You are truly a poetess extraordinaire!

    Like

    • Dear Ann,
      Thanks for writing. I’m glad you liked Becky’s interview. You are right, Becky is truly a poetess extraordinaire! Good luck with your writing!

      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

  10. I love the interview Joan, you always ask great questions. Becky, Wow! I love the fact that you interview your main characters that’s an awesome idea I need to apply with my writing. What I found adorable was your description that inspired you to write your new story about Jose the Cowgirl that was really sweet and visual, I could imagine the little girl with her sassy attitude and how she’s going to show them. The interview was very informative and as always your kindness shines through.

    Like

    • Dear Scroll Writer,
      Thanks for writing. I’m honored that you like my questions. Thank you.

      You are right. Becky is very kind and creates wonderful characters full of fun and mischief, too.

      Celebrate you
      Never Give Up
      Joan

      Like

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