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    Active since 0ctober 9, 2009. Thank you for reading and leaving comments on my blog.

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Interview with Dan Klennert – Amazing Iron Sculptor


 

7x9 818 Dan Klennert and the love of his llife

Dan Klennert and Barb, the love of his life

“Interview with Dan Klennert – Amazing Iron Sculptor” by Joan Y. Edwards

In July 2017, I had the pleasure of visiting Dan Klennert’s Recycled Spirits of Iron Sculpture Park with my daughter, Lorrie; my sister, Janet; and my nephew, Mike. Oh my goodness! What a treasure we found!

Mike, Lorrie, Dan Klennert, Janet, and Joan

With Dan Klennert’s hands, old horse shoes are fashioned into gigantic fish and horses. Backhoe teeth become the jaws of a dinosaur and the drive lines of a Ford van become its legs. Articles of scrap metal that once toiled in fields or churned in engines are rescued from the trash and reborn as remarkable sculptures. What society once used and then discarded as junk, Dan instills with dignity and new meaning.

I am happy that Dan Klennert agreed to be a guest on my blog today! Welcome, Dan!

Dan: Thank you, Joan. I am glad you enjoyed visiting my park. It’s fun talking with visitors. 

You call your park “Ex-Nihilo (pronounced X-Ne-High-Low) Latin words for “Something Made Out of Nothing.” You’ve certainly done that. Here are three of my favorite sculptures at the park: 

“EEK, a spider,” says Janet. Spider by Dan Klennert

Rooster by Dan Klennert

6x8 Janet and giraffe 805

Janet with Giraffe by Dan Klennert

1. When did you first get involved with art and old wore out items?

Dan: I fell in love with art in Seattle when I was about 7 or 8 years old. I’d sit on the front porch and draw. I’d take my red wagon and search through neighborhood junk piles. I found great stuff that way.  I went to school mostly for art. It was great! I just loved it. I find love and respect from my art.

Horse by Dan Klennert

 

2. Tell us more about how you became the sculptor you are today?

Dan: This is the journey in my life that made me the artist I am today. As a young child I fell in love with art by tracing pictures out of my coloring book. That lead to drawing free hand which I loved to do all through high school. 

After high school I went to work as a mechanic and fell in love with the wore out broken gears and sprockets. My foreman showed me how to glue metal together with an arc welder. At that time I put my love for art and my love for wore out metal together and started creating sculpture and at the same time practicing welding. From there I entered in art and craft shows and the rest is history.

5x3 797 motorcycle

Skeleton and motorcycle by Dan Klennert

3. Why do you create art sculptures?

Dan: I create for the love of art. I get inspiration from the shapes and spirits contained in old metal and driftwood. I see a vision in my mind’s eye as to what certain shapes want to be.  Then I use music to put me deep into my imagination to create the vision. I like to think that I’m recycling the spirit of the piece and giving it new life. My love is preserving these older pieces of metal that contain some history and were made by the hands of man. I feel I’m giving new life to the tools and machines that made America what it is today.

4. What kind of music helps get you in the creative mood?

Dan: I use loud rock and roll music to get deep into my imagination and to kick butt in creating a piece. I also like using mellow music for people who view my sculptures because it helps them get on the right side of the brain.

5. Are there books that helped you improve your skills in creating your sculptures?

Dan: I am self taught but I had some help by working with older people and tapping them for their knowledge. I believe I suffer from A.D.D. and never have used books for learning my skill, I do use books for pictures to study shapes and forms of what I am creating.

6. Do you create sculptures for clients?

Dan: I have done commission pieces, but I don’t like doing them because my process is I turn up the music, crawl into my imagination and find a piece of metal that inspires me on what to create. Doing a commission piece I miss out on the foundation of falling in love with the image that a certain shape of metal or driftwood inspired me to create.

7. Are sculptures in your park for sale? What are the range of prices?

Dan: My pieces out in my park are for sale, range is 4500 to 80k.

8. Where do you get your material for your sculptures?

Dan: I get my “rusty gold” material for my sculptures from recycle bins, abandoned farms, junkyards and sometimes from fans.  I visualize my sculptures from the shapes of the rusty junk and go into a kind of creative, emotional trance when in my studio. I have been known to work two days straight and it felt as if only eight hours had gone by.

Dan Klennert with his rusty gold iron

Dan Klennert choosing a piece of driftwood for his next project

6x8 832 wood

Pile of driftwood and other wood for future projects

Dan, thank you very much for sharing your story and your sculpture with us here on my blog.  

Dan: You’re welcome. I hope your blog readers will visit my park soon. I’d love to meet them.

To leave a comment, click below and scroll to the bottom of the page.

COMMENT

Resources for more information about Dan Klennert:

  1. To visit Dan Klennert’s Recycled Spirits of Iron Sculpture Park, go to State Route 706 towards Mt. Rainier National Park – 3 miles East of Elbe, Washington.  (Admission Price: Donation. Dan’s Gallery (inside) is only open from May through October. The Sculpture Park (outdoors) is open year round.
  2. Website: www.DanielKlennert.com
  3. Contact information: Mailing Address: Dan Klennert, P.O. Box 401 Elbe, WA 98330; Phone 360-569-2280
  4. Walt Disney featured Dan Klennert  in the Disney Movie “America’s Heart and Soul.” DVD Available: http://movies.disney.com/americas-heart-and-soul
  5. The Mt. Rainier Visitor Association sponsored Dan Klennert in a YouTube presentation: “Recycled Spirits of Iron:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xAlZ7xjr2wI

Thank you for reading my blog.

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

My Books:
Flip Flap Floodle, Will this little duck’s song save him from Mr. Fox?
Joan’s Elder Care Guide published by 4RV Publishing

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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Author Interview with Joan Reid aka Gianna B. Reid (Writing Tips and a Poem)


GiaanB Reid photo 20017

“Author Interview with Joan Reid aka Gianna B. Reid (Writing Tips and a Poem)” by Joan Y. Edwards

Hi, Joan Reid.  I’m very happy to have you as a guest on my blog today.
It’s a pleasure to be here with you. 

My readers are anxious to learn about you, so let’s get started.

a. Where were you born?
I was born in New York City.  My family moved to New Jersey when I was 2 years old. I have lived in New York State for the past 20 years.

b. Did you have a favorite place to read a book as a child? Where and why?
I read often on the couch in the living room or at the kitchen table after supper.

c. Who or what inspires you to keep on writing?
My parents and a grammar school teacher, then people whom I have met along the way, and now my husband, daughter and my friendsand you, Joan Edwards! (See Joan Edwards smiling)

d. What do you do for the pure fun of it?
I love riding my bicycle! It helps clear my mind for more writing.

e. What are your hobbies? Do you draw? Paint? Work with clay? Sew? Do woodworking?

Photography, creating collages, and reading are three activities I most enjoy.

f. What are your favorite books that you enjoy reading more than one time? Why?

  • A Year By the Sea by Joan Anderson; and

  • Tao of Writing by Ralph L. Wahlstrom

These books are vastly different, but each brings a fresh focus every time I read a passage.

g. Do you have a funny story to share?

I have a sense of humor for sure, but I cannot recall a specific funny story.

Incidents are funnier when I tell them.

h. Why do you write? 

My reasons for writing:  I have to write what I observe and feel; Writing is enjoyable and fun;  Writing is my connection to myself and others.

i. What are three tips for writers?

  1. When you write, don’t edit until all your ideas are down.

  2. Leave the piece for a day or more to look at it with fresh eyes. When you revisit the work you will be able to edit for content.

  3. READ!

j. What is the most essential ingredient of a poem?

For me, the most essential ingredient of a poem is emotion which is an intangible.

k. Do you have a poem you’d like to share with us that’s not in And the Woman Smiled and is shared first and exclusively in this guest post?

 

I am a Word – © Gianna B. Reid 2017

 

Poetry is—

words scribbled across people’s faces,

on objects, landscapes, in empty rooms,

the splendid and the ugly.

I see and feel words in open spaces, hallways,

in a blade of grass

looking upward to its sun-god.

Soaking in the 24-carat butter of

its rays smeared on blue-toast.

Can we separate ourselves from words?

I am a word.

Today, I am joy.

Aww! Thank you, Joan (Gianna B. Reid). That is a great poem.

l. Would you share three of your favorite poems? (Title and Author)

  1. “August” by Helen Maria Winslow
    https://lettersfromahillfarm.blogspot.com/2013/08/todays-poem-by-helen-maria-winslow.html

  2. “The Sun Poem” by Mary Oliver http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/mary_oliver/poems/15800

  3. Numerous poems by Billy Collins
    https://www.poemhunter.com/billy-collins/poems/

  4. Numerous poems by William. S. Merwin
    https://www.poemhunter.com/william-stanley-merwin/

m. And the Woman Smiled is your latest book. What company did you choose to publish this poetry book?

I self-published it on CreateSpace.com/

n. Where can readers buy And the Woman Smiled?

Readers can purchase it on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/Woman-Smiled-Gianna-B-Reid/dp/1545143323/ref

o. Did you pay for editing services before you submitted to CreateSpace?

CreateSpace does offer editing services. However, I did not pay them for editing services for And the Woman Smiled.” I did all the formatting and editing myself.

p. Did CreateSpace design your cover? Did you have any choices?

CreateSpace has many choices of book covers, fonts, and trim-sizes on their website. I chose a design provided by CreateSpace.  

q. How are you marketing your book?

I sent review copies to publications that consider self-published poetry, and two local magazines in the Hudson Valley area.  And, I am thankful for this interview!

r. Did you get to choose the retail price for your book?

CreateSpace determined the retail price. There is a minimum charge which
I made every attempt to stay close to.

s. Were you ever traditionally published?

I was a contributor to a traditionally published book, The Bicycle Book – Wit, Wisdom & Wanderings, Published by Satya House.

t. What are the titles and links to your other books? Are they available on Amazon, too?

I have 16 titles on Amazon as Gianna B. Reid.

I self-published Life is a Bike;  and Yes We Can!

I contributed to the following book with Anisa Claire West:
Crime Flies! (Mystery Collection)
https://www.amazon.com/Crime-Flies-Mystery-Collection-Claire-ebook/dp/B00WIYC76Q/ref

Here are links to some of my other books:

Like Gary Cooper (Super Duper)
https://www.amazon.com/Like-Gary-Cooper-Super-Duper-ebook/dp/B00D8GXAVE/ref

Gold Trotter Mystery Series (First 3 from the 9-book series)

Dogs Never Lie
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00C51ASDQ/ref

Blue Hill Heist
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DuGTU3E/ref

Until We Kiss
https://www.amazon.com/Until-We-Kiss-Revised-Expanded-ebook/dp/B00I2DOIJQ/ref

m. Do you have a blog?

My blog is: http://joansview-jbreid.blogspot.com

u. How can others connect with you on social media? 

Readers may connect with me on Face Book and Linked In.  Send an email request to me at joan.reid@yahoo.com

Short Bio

Joan Bellofatto Reid (Gianna B.Reid) began writing plays and short stories in elementary school. She has since written and produced several plays: The Jobless Chronicle (winner of Monologue Mania, performed at The Producer’s Club, NYC); and His Last Word, about Holocaust survivor, Primo Levi.  Life is a Bike was a newspaper column that appeared in the US and UK, the essays are available on Amazon.  She contributed essays to The Bicycle Book: Wit, Wisdom and Wanderings.  Other published works: “The Marriage Game”  “Path to Promise” (Student Aid Transcript Magazine); “Not a Fake Pollock” (Art Times); “Not Guilty” (Modern Collage).  Joan hosted a radio show, “Cool on the Groove” (Rockland World Radio) from 2003-2006, featuring authors, poets and journalists.  She currently freelances on education and healthcare; and writes poetry.

Wow! Joan Reid. I’ve really enjoyed learning about you. I had no idea you’d written so many books! I am very proud of you. Thanks again for being a guest on my blog.

Thanks for reading this guest interview. Joan Reid will be glad to answer any questions and respond to any comments you leave for her in the comment area.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

My Books:
Flip Flap Floodle, Will this little duck’s song save him from Mr. Fox?
Joan’s Elder Care Guide published by 4RV Publishing

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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How to Draw in Two-Point Perspective


“How to Draw in Two-Point Perspective” by Joan Y. Edwards

Two-point perspective has two vanishing point lines heading out from one particular corner spot in an image. Usually at the top and bottom of a vertical line that juts out.

I found several pictures on Pixabay that might help you understand a little better about it. If a building juts out towards you, with lines going out from it in two other directions, it probably is in two-point perspective.

Also, if you’re looking at a room, where you can only see one corner of a room in the distance and two walls jutting at an angle from it, it probably is a two-point perspective.

Here are five images to help you understand.

Image Examples of Two-Point Perspective:

 

Image 1 – Two Point Perspective – Point is towards you (Pixabay)

Image 2 – Two Point Perspective – Point is away from you (Pixabay)

 

Image 3 – Two-point Perspective – Point is towards you (Pixabay)

Image 4 – Two-Point Perspective – Point is away from you (Pixabay)

 

Image 5 – Two-Point Perspective – Point is towards you (Pixabay)

 

Steps to Drawing a Building in Two-Point Perspective

  1. Draw your horizon line straight across the page.
  2. Draw two points about a half-inch from the edge of the paper: one on the left side of the horizon line and another on the right side of the horizon line. These are your two vanishing points. All diagonal lines will go through one of these points. I discovered that if I make each dot an X then, it was easier to find and easier to line up with it.
  3. Draw the middle line that juts out towards you.
  4. Draw a line from top of the jut line to the left vanishing point.
  5. Draw a line from the bottom of the jut line to the left vanishing point.
  6. Draw a line from the bottom of the jut line to the right vanishing point.
  7. Draw a line from the bottom of the jut line to the left vanishing point.

Here are two images I drew for you in two-point perspective.

The first is a sketch of a laundry room. This time the jut line is away from you. I hope you can tell what the items are. If you can’t, just write me a little note and ask.

Illustration of two-point perspective – Laundry Room Copyright 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

The second illustration is also one of two-point perspective. This time the jut line is facing you. I drew a part of a city, I only drew two buildings so that I wouldn’t cover up the original two vanishing points. I made the image in the blog especially big, so that you might be able to see the red X’s for the vanishing points.

Illustration of two point perspective – City buildings and park Copyright 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

I hope that you enjoyed reading my blog. I hope you’ll try doing two-point perspective or draw for the adventure of doing it. Just to think that I started out with a horizon line and 2 vanishing points on each end. Simply amazing to me. One of the reasons, I’ve been working on perspective is so I’ll be able to make the illustrations better for my chapter book, Larry, the Terrifying Turkey.

I guess you noticed that sometimes one or both of the vanishing points can act like the single vanishing point. Things tend to get smaller in the distance. On city streets, you might need more than two points of perspective.

I hope you will leave me a note. I love hearing from the people who read my blog. I’d be honored if you would share it with others on Facebook, Twitter, or email.

Lots of Resources – Lots and Lots of Resources

Websites:

  1. ContrastBlack Studio DesignTutsPlus.com. Technical Drawing for Beginners: Two Point Perspective:” https://design.tutsplus.com/articles/technical-drawing-for-beginners-two-point-perspective–vector-21862
  2. Hello Artsy.com. “2 Pt Perspective Drawing: Step by Step:” http://helloartsy.com/2pt-perspective/
  3. Instructables.com. “How to Make a Two Point Perspective Drawing:” http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Two-Point-Perspective-Drawing/

 

YouTube Videos

  1. Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw in 2-Point Perspective: A Modern House:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZ0IgP25sV8
  2. iDraw. “How To Draw In Two Point Perspective | Easy:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29-bPAhvzFI
  3. Frank Korb. “Two Point Perspective Stairs:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFwevKdC-r8&t=24s
  4. Circle Line Art School. Tom. “How to Draw an Airplane and Airport in 2-Point Perspective:” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgfeehj48a4
  5. Circle Line Art School. Tom. “How to Draw a City in Two Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNq78n02fMQ&t=167s
  6. Diane Wood. “How to Draw a Room in 2 Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCanYY7eLeA
  7. Joshua Hendry. Drawing Tutorial – 2 Point Perspective (Buildings):” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwYUHx4Yong
  8. Milan Claudio. “2-Point Perspective City Drawing Tutorial:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qUIVGKGzB8
  9. Online Drawing Lessons. “Two Point Perspective Drawing Tutorial (A Room):” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvTPywbY2yM
  10. Paul Priestley. “How to Use Two Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfvTGb1igZ4
  11. Suzette Morrow. “2 Point Perspective Drawing:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpLJT_SHqpU
  12. Virtual Instructor. “Two Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZ0IgP25sV8
  13. idraw. “How to Draw Two Point Perspective| Easy:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29-bPAhvzFI

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards
Flip Flap Floodle, Will this little duck’s song save him from Mr. Fox?
Joan’s Elder Care Guide published by 4RV Publishing

Blog post Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

 

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Plant Success Seeds for Your Next Conference Now


fruits-863072_640 (1)

“Plant Success Seeds for Your Next Conference Now" by Joan Y. Edwards

You have the magical seeds needed for your success. Your inner mojo or magical power is there for you to use 24 hours a day.  Look for it. Plant it. Nourish it. To help you grow in confidence, you need to grow in skills and abilities. Plant these seeds for your success at your next conference.

 

Before the Conference

  1. Believe in you. Activate this belief. BELIEVE IN YOU AND YOUR ABILITIES. That's the first seed for success. Believe in you. You can do all things necessary for your success.
  2. Set your goals. What skill do you most want to improve? Attend the workshops that will help you improve that skill. I hope that by attending a conference, you’ll learn a new skill or marketing technique that inspires you to reach your goals. You have what it takes for success. You may have to look through different eyes, through a different window to see it.
  3. Visit the web pages of three presenters that interest you. If they have a website, read the about me section. Check out their books at your local library or on Amazon or Barnes and Noble.
  4. If you have specific questions for presenters, write them down on 3×5 cards and ask them at the conference during the workshops. If you don’t get a chance to ask them in person, most handouts or websites give contact information so you can write and ask them later.
  5. Get business cards with your name, address, phone number, email address, website, and blog. Many people put an image and link to their publishedbooks on the back. Usewww.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.com, or local print shop. You can also create business cards on your computer.
  6. Writers: Prepare a postcard, business card, bookmark. Use your book titles and pitch blurbs. Get these giveaways printed at www.VistaPrint.com,www.Gotprint.com, or other print shop. You can also create them by hand or with your computer.Illustrators: Prepare a portfolio of 10-20 of your illustrations. Make sure these are the kind of illustrations that you enjoy creating. Prepare a postcard with a sample illustration on it. If you have illustrated a published book, put it on one side and put a different story's illustration on the back of the postcard. Share with people you meet at the conference. Also send one of your postcards to the art directors for publishing companies represented at the conference.r illustrators. Get bookmarks and or postcards printed atwww.VistaPrint.comwww.Gotprint.com, or other print shop. You can also create them by hand or on your computer.
  7. Buy a new spiral notebook with a bright colorful design, a composition book with a black and white cover, or a sketch book.This way all of your notes are in one place. You can put it in front of your computer when you get home, and transfer your handwritten notes to your computer. You can add information from handouts by scanning them into your computer, or by typing what you want to remember from the handouts.
  8. Writers: Buy two pens that are dependable and write just the way you like a pen to write. Put them in your pocketbook to take with you. Illustrators: Take a pencil, a ruler, and a white eraser.
  9. Write a pitch for three of your manuscripts. Print out your pitches on 3×5 cards, 4×6 inch cards, or plain 8.5 x 11 printing paper. Carry two copies of each pitch with you to the conference. Put one copy in a folder and the other in your pocketbook. Practice giving your pitch in front of a mirror. Use eye contact. Memorize it. If your pitch is longer than on 3×5 index card, it is too long.
  10. Take comfortable clothing to wear in your favorite colors to keep your spirits high. Take a sweater or blazer, in case the air conditioning is too cool for your inner thermostat.If you’re hot, you can take off the blazer. A good work attire for writers/illustrators is a pair of jeans, a shirt, and a blazer. Linda Rohrbough says that you want the editors to think you just left your computer to meet with them. Be comfortable. If you feel better being all dressed up, dress up. It’s important for you to be comfortable and feel distinguished. Wear comfortable shoes.
  11. Check your laptop, iPad, or iPhone. Charge its battery. Bring your charger to the conference.
  12. Copy the  full manuscripts of your Works in Progress and other pertinent information you may need for the conference to a portable drive or flash drive for your laptop or use a cloud data holder. If you use Dropbox, you can put your manuscripts in it and access it from your iPad or iPhone or other electronic devices. It allows you to see your manuscript from all devices. Check it out before you leave home to make sure it works.
  13. Check out the directions to the conference. Find the restaurants that are located close to the conference that serve the kind of food you can eat.

At the Conference

1.Take notes.

Take notes using your new spiral notebook or composition book or take notes on your laptop or other device.

2.Hand out business cards.

Hand out business cards to everyone with whom you talk. Ask for their businesscards, too. This will give you resources to check after the conference. The more you do this, the more comfortable and natural it will be for you. Make a goal of handing out at least 10-30 cards and getting an equal number in exchange.

3.Talk to people sitting beside you in a workshop.

Do you feel lonely and out of touch with people? Talk to the people who sit beside you in the workshops. Exchange names, email addresses, and business cards with them. Here are possible questions to start your conversation:

“What are you writing?”

“Are you in writing group? Is it online or face-to-face?”

“How do you find time to write (illustrate)?”

“Do you (draw) write best in the morning or at night?”

4.  If you meet a publisher or agent, ask them questions about themselves and their projects.

If you happen to meet an agent or editor in the elevator or at lunch, remember he/she is human, like you. Ask one of these questions or one of your own:

“What is your favorite project right now?”
“How do you know when a book is right for you?”
“What’s your advice for writers(illustrators)?”

5. Writers: Be ready to answer questions about your writing with a pitch.

After your question for an editor or agent, there is a great possibility he/she will ask you, “What kind of writing do you do?” This is a perfect lead in for your pitch. Hold your head high. Look the editor/agent in the eye. Pretend he’s your best friend and tell him your pitch.

Illustrators: Be ready to answer questions about your illustrating. Tell people three things you like to draw and if your like to portray humor, the dark side, nature, etc.

6. Take a short walk for exercise in between sessions.

7. Get plenty of sleep.

8. Eat healthy fruits, vegetables, and proteins. Drink plenty of water. This will keep you alert and focused.

9. Enjoy yourself and learn as much as you can.

10. List twenty things for which you are thankful each morning before you get out of bed.

11. Thank the presenters and the organizers.

12. If you are inspired by a book you hear about or see in the bookstore at the conference, buy it or borrow it from your public library.

After the Conference

1. Sleep, if you’re tired.

Accept yourself and others as you are. Focus on what you want. Be thankful for what you have. Be grateful for where you are. Put the fun back into your writing.

2. After you’ve rested, read and organize your notes from each workshop.

Edit your notes and add information from your handouts. You can scan pertinent information from the handouts into your computer.  Write at least three major things you learned from each workshop. You can write down more details if you want.

3. Make a top ten list of things that you learned at the overall conference.

4. Write/Revise Your Writing/Illustrating Goals

After this information soaks into your mind, body, and spirit, write/revise three writing/illustrating goals using the skills and information you learned. (Be patient with yourself.)

5. Writing Skill/Genre Goals

a) Read ten books in your chosen genre and three books on the craft of writing and/or illustrating.

b) Revise your favorite manuscript and submit it to an editor or agent.

c)  Revise 3 of your favorite illustrations. Choose one to create a new postcard and send to a prospective publishing company.

6. Marketing Goals

a) Learn a new technology.

b) Submit manuscripts/sample illustrations to different agents and/or editors often.

c) Join or create a critique group.

c) Join my Pub Subbers Yahoo Group, a group to encourage you to submit your manuscript/portfolio often (monthly if possible). To join, write me and tell me why you would like to join at joanyedwards1@gmail.com. Members postsuccesses, ask other members for help. etc. Members receive automated reminders for the weekly steps to get your work ready for submission.

Pub Subbers
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4

d) Prepare a book presentation for schools/organization.

e) Prepare a proposal to present a workshop for a writing conference.

f) Prepare a pitch for a manuscript. Go from a page summary and then focus on the words to hook readers. Keep shortening your pitch: 200-100-50-25 words. The ultimate goal is a pitch that is 140 characters long (approximately 25 words) that fits in Twitter. If you have all these different lengths, you will have a pitch to use in your cover letter, proposal, and for the rave blurbs for the back cover of yourbook. Your pitch is the magnetic tool that will entice people to buy your book.

7. Networking Goals

a) Create a website and/or blog.

b) Join a critique group.that focuses on genres you write or illustrate.

c) Give book presentations/workshops for schools and organizations

d) Create an author/illustrator page on Facebook and post news of your publishing journey.

e) Create a Twitter Account.Tweet your blog posts and your publishing news.

f) Visit the websites of three people who shared a business card with you.  Email them. Here are possible points to include in your email. Remind them of how you enjoyed talking with them. Thank them for sharing a resource. Congratulate them on their manuscript, portfolio, or book. Compliment them for being brave if they read their story at open mike. Thank them for giving you a new way to look at a problem.

g) Make a list of your followers on Facebook and Twitter. When you get your book published, they will be helpful in spreading the word about your book.  Interact with at least 25 of them on a regular basis.

Resources

  1. Amy Bishop. http://www.projecteve. "Do I Still Need Business Cards for Networking?" http://www.projecteve.com/do-i-still-need-business-cards-for-networking/
  2. Deborah Shane. "What to Do Before Attending a Conference?" https://smallbiztrends.com/2014/04/what-to-do-before-attending-a-conference.html
  3. Kristen Lamb, “Getting the Most Out of Writing Conferences:” http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2010/04/07/getting-the-most-out-of-writing-conferences/.
  4. Margo L. Dill, “Writers Conferences: Five Reasons Why You Should Go NOW, and How to Get the Most for Your Money:” http://www.wow-womenonwriting.com/13-FE-MargoDill.html/.
  5. Marita Littauer, “Four Keys for Writers ConferenceSuccess:” http://www.right-writing.com/conference-keys.html/.
  6. Travelle. "How to Prepare for a Conference:"http://www.huffingtonpost.com/travelle/how-to-prepare-for-a-conf_b_8413424.html
  7. Yvonne Russell, “Getting the Most out of a Writers’ Conference:” http://www.growyourwritingbusiness.com/?p=47/.

Thank you for reading my blog. Each time you read one of my articles, you honor me.  I hope your success is better than you ever imagined.

Click on comment and scroll down to the bottom of the page.

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Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2012-2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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Are You Thinking Straight? Check Your Beliefs.


Are you thinking straight

“Are You Thinking Straight? Check Your Beliefs.” by Joan Y. Edwards

I was searching through papers from my teaching days yesterday, looking for pictures that might need scanning, when I came across a paper I’d saved with hints for clear thinking from Dr. Albert Ellis, a famous pyschologist in the 1950’s.  He designed a therapy called Rational Therapy. Dr. Ellis believed that Rational Therapy was more direct, efficient, and effective than pyschotherapy.  Later they changed the name of his therapy to Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy.

Dr. Ellis said there are 12 false thoughts or beliefs that are prevalent with people that lead to problems in our thinking. If our thinking is faulty, our emotions may be out of whack, too. I’ll bet you’re familiar with at least one of these faulty statements.  Dr. Ellis wrote them as we-statements; I changed them to I-statements. I added what I believe are healthier ways of thinking for each of them.

(Hint for Writers: You can use one or two of these erroneous thinking statements as flaws for your character(s) in your stories.

  1. Faulty way of thinking: I must be loved by everyone and everyone must approve everything I do. Healthier way of thinking: It’s okay if some people don’t love me and don’t approve of everything that I do.
  2. Faulty way of thinking: I must be thoroughly competent, adequate, intelligent, and achieving in all possible respects. Healthier way of thinking: I don’t have to be thoroughly competent, adequate, intelligent, and achieving in all possible respects.
  3. Faulty way of thinking: Certain acts are wrong or wicked or villainous, and people who perform them should be severely punished. Healthier way of thinking: Certain acts are wrong or wicked or villainous and people who perform them will be punished by God. It is not my job to judge them. Judge their actions, not them as a person. The authorities who govern the area where they live are in charge of  judging and punishing them for their actions, if deemed necessary by the law.
  4. Faulty way of thinking: It is a terrible catastrophe when things are not as I would like them to be. Healthier way of thinking: Things can be okay even when things are not as I would like for them to be.
  5. Faulty way of thinking: Unhappiness is the result of external events and happenings that are forced on us and that we have no control over. Healthier way of thinking: Happiness is the result of my internal beliefs and thoughts about external events and happenings. I can control the thoughts and beliefs on which I focus.
  6. Faulty way of thinking: We should be greatly concerned about dangerous and fearful things and must center our thinking on them until the danger is passed. Healthier way of thinking: I should be concerned about dangerous and fearful things, but I should center my thinking on surviving the dangers and facing my fears.
  7. Faulty way of thinking: It is easier to avoid difficulties and responsibilities than to face them. Healthier way of thinking: It is easier to face difficulties and responsibilities than to avoid them.
  8. Faulty way of thinking: We need a person stronger than ourselves to rely on. Healthier way of thinking: I am as strong a person as I need to be to do what I need to do. I don’t need someone stronger than me to rely on. God will help me.
  9. Faulty way of thinking: Because something greatly influenced us in the past, it must determine our present behavior;  the influence of the past cannot be overcome. Healthier way of thinking: Even if something greatly influenced me in the past, it does not have to determine my present behavior. The influence of the past can be overcome.
  10. Faulty way of thinking: What other people do is vitally important to me, and I should make every effort to change them to be the way I think they should be. Healthier way of thinking: Sometimes what other people do is vitally important to me. I should accept them as they are. If their behavior harms you in some way, explain how you would prefer for them to act. Realize that they may or may not do it. Behavior is a choice.
  11. Faulty way of thinking: There is one perfect solution to every problem, and if it is not found, the result will be terrible. Healthier way of thinking: There is more than one solution with good results to every problem.
  12. Faulty way of thinking: I have virtually no control over my emotions; I am their victim and cannot help how I feel. Healthier way of thinking: If I change my beliefs and thoughts, I can change my emotions. I am a victor; not a victim.

Resources

  1. Ann Jorn. Psychcentral.com. “Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy:”
    https://psychcentral.com/lib/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy/
  2. Famous Psychologists. “Albert Ellis:” http://www.psychologistanywhereanytime.com/famous_psychologist_and_psychologists/psychologist_famous_albert_ellis.htm
  3. Smart Recovery.org. “Basics of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy:” http://www.smartrecovery.org/resources/library/For_Family_Volunteers_Professionals/basics-of-rebt.pdf
  4. Good Therapy.org. “Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT):” http://www.goodtherapy.org/learn-about-therapy/types/rational-emotive-behavioral-therapy

I hope you enjoyed reading this blog post. To leave me a note, please click on comment below and scroll to the bottom of the page. I’d love to hear which of these faulty thoughts you’ve had and how you changed it. Or just tell me a change, you’re glad you made.

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Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

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“Don’t Tell God How Big Your Problem Is; Tell Your Problem How Big Your God Is” – Author Unknown


Don’t Tell God How Big Your Problem Is; Tell Your Problem How Big Your God Is.”
…Author Unknown

Many times during my life, I wish I had been familiar with this saying: “Don’t tell God how big your problem is, tell your problem how big your God is.”

In his homily during a February 12, 2017 weekday Mass at St. Matthew Catholic Church in Charlotte, NC, Fr. Casmir Maduakor from Nigeria told us: “Don’t tell God how big your problem is, tell your problem how big your God is.”

Today I’m reminding you that your God is bigger than any problem you have now or ever will have. Trust that He is going to bring GOOD out of every problem situation you ever have. Tell your problem how big your God is. It will crumble before your very eyes. Watch a solution show up. See your problem disappear. 

In the year 2000, when I was driving Mother from Delaware to Charlotte, NC after they repaired her left hip, I couldn’t get her back in the car. She had gotten out but was walking like Tim Conway as the Oldest Man  or Mr. Tudball on the Carol Burnett Show

She walked for ten minutes and moved two feet. So I had to call for help. I called to a man on the sidewalk in front of the car, “Sir, sir. Would you help me, please?”

He said, “How can I help you?”

“I got my Mother out to go to the restroom, but she’s not moving very fast and doesn’t have any energy. I need to get her back in the car. I have a blanket. If you could pull her from this side to the other on her blanket, I would appreciate it very much. She’s limp and can’t pull herself.”

So I sat Mother down on her blanket and he pulled her to the left side of the car. He stopped and said, “Is this far enough?”

I said, “No. Her feet are hanging out the door.”

He smiled and said, “Then I believe I need to pull her a little farther.” And he did. Then he put a pillow behind her head and shut the door.

When Mother’s feet were inside the door, I covered her with another blanket, and closed the other door. 

I thanked the man and asked him if I could give him a hug. He said, “Yes.” So I walked around the car to him and gave him a big hug. But it was me who needed the hug. The man told me I was welcome and headed on his own path.

There were many times when I was caring for Mother that God sent someone to help me. My problems disappeared. 

Believe and it will be given to you.
Ask and you shall receive.
Trust that God will hear your voice and help you.

I pray that you always have the help you need.

I’d love to hear from you, please click on comment and scroll down to the bottom of the page to write me a note.

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Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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One Point Perspective – Art


Pixabay one point perspective road-166543__480

Pixabay – Creative Commons

“One Point Perspective – Art” by Joan Y. Edwards

When I was in college at Western Carolina University, I took a few art courses. In one of them the instructor taught us one point perspective. We went outside and painted different buildings from across the street in one point perspective. My sister, Janet, says she still has those drawings. It’s amazing that watching You-Tube videos can refresh your memory and also give you new techniques to help you improve your drawing of things in perspective. I listed resources I personally liked that teach you one point perspective.

Definition: What is perspective?

Helen South states that “Perspective drawing gives a three-dimensional feeling to a picture. In art, it is a system of representing the way that objects appear to get smaller and closer together the further away they are in the scene.”

Things seem to get farther and farther away until they vanish at a point. Many times that point is near the middle of the page, but doesn’t have to. If you’re looking down the street, objects closer to you look larger than the objects farther away from you.

Here are a few other images that show you one point perspective:

Pixabay tree path road-21205__480

Pixabay Image – Creative Commons

Notice how everything seems to lead to one particular point in the images near the back of the picture. Everything close to you looks bigger and items farther away get smaller.  With the trees you can see more of he front tree than you can of the others. You can see more of the buildings that are closer to you, than the ones that are farther away.

Pixabay sidewalk-657906__480

Here are hints for drawing in one point perspective:

  • Make all diagonal (slanted) lines so that they come from the single dot vanishing point. The Vanishing Point marks where you stop seeing separate diagonal lines going away from you. It looks like they come together there. It makes things look smaller as they get farther away from your eyes. It makes things look larger as they get closer to your eyes. In other words, these diagonal lines that look like an upside down V help you see things on the page in perspective.
  • All straight lines across will be parallel with the horizon line.
  • All straight up and down (vertical) lines will be parallel with the right and left side edges of the paper.

Activities

Materials You’ll Need:  8.5 x 11 inch piece of paper, a ruler, a pencil, and a white eraser. 

If you are drawing a room in one point perspective, here is one way to begin:

IMG_0745

  1. Draw a line from the top left hand corner to the lower right hand corner of your paper.
  2. Draw a line from the top right hand corner to the lower left hand corner of your paper.
  3. Draw a straight line across the middle of the page. This will be your horizon line.
  4. Mark a dark dot in the middle of the horizon line. You can use a red colored pencil to help it stand out. This dot is called your vanishing point. 
  5. If you want, you can draw a rectangle to represent the wall at the far end of the room or hall.
  6. Now draw the hallway or room in detail with pictures on walls, desks, chairs, and doorways or windows.  Good luck😊!

If you are drawing a street scene, road, or railroad track scene, you might want to start with these directions:

IMG_0739

  1. Draw a straight line across the page close to the middle of the paper. This will be your horizon line.
  2. Draw a dot near the middle of the page. This will be your vanishing point.
  3. Decide how far apart you want your up-side-down V-shaped diagonal lines. Draw two diagonal lines that go from the vanishing point to the bottom of the page so that they are wider at the bottom.
  4. Draw the other items. Any slanted line will go through the vanishing point. The straight lines will be horizontal or vertical.

Exercises

  1. Print out one of the three pictures above or another one point perspective image from your own personal photo collection. Trace it or draw it using pencil and ruler. Be sure to note your horizon line and vanishing point, as well as the slanted, diagonal lines that all lead to the vanishing point.
  2. Sit in your front yard and sketch what you see in one point perspective.
  3. Sketch a hall scene from your house. Take a picture of it and draw it or sit at one end of the hall and draw it.
  4. Sketch a garden scene in one point perspective.

 

Resources

Graph Paper – Grid Paper

  1. Graph Paper Perspective. You can choose the size paper and how many inches you want the lines to be apart, etc. https://incompetech.com/graphpaper/perspective/
  2. Printable Paper.net. Free to print. One Point Perspective guide lines on paper
    Perspectivehttps://www.printablepaper.net/category/perspective

Written Step-by-Step with Images and Text

  1. http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/one-point-perspective-drawing
  2. C. Ibarra. “How to Create a Hallway With One Point Perspective:” https://snapguide.com/guides/create-a-hallway-with-one-point-perspective/
  3. Drawing Coach.com. “1 Point Perspective Drawing – Lesson 2 How to Draw a Circle:” http://www.drawingcoach.com/1-point-perspective.html
  4. Helen South.  “How to Draw One Point Perspective:” https://www.thoughtco.com/one-point-perspective-drawing-tutorial-1123412

Videos on You-Tube

  1. Fletcher Ceramics. “Easy 1 Point Perspective.” (brick building on a street)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFmek_sesfo
  2. Matt – Virtual Instructor. “One Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJYBMr5MKoo
  3. Melinda Nguyen “One Point Perspective – Streetscape:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phiEaRGBv-4
  4. Milton Kaynes You-tube Channel. “How To Draw A Room with One Point Perspective:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30tzJG6EOTo
  5. Otis Art Docents. “Lesson 5B – One Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twcFW0RyOO8
  6. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw 1-Point Perspective for Beginners: A Hallway:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ICyLN6I2cY
  7. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw a House in One-Point Perspective.”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i776k0zEzEc
  8. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw a Room in One-Point Perspective.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEymIyLbiAI
  9. Tom at Circle Line Art School. “How to Draw Using One Point Perspective: (Railroad Track)” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRrKohWdpeQ

Thank you for reading my blog. I appreciate you very much. I’d love to hear from you.

Click comment below and scroll down to bottom of page to leave a comment.

COMMENT

Never Give Up
Live with Enthusiasm
Celebrate Each Step You Take

Joan Y. Edwards
Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

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    Never Give Up
    Live with Enthusiasm
    Celebrate Each Step You Take

    Joan Y. Edwards
    Copyright © 2017 Joan Y. Edwards

    ***************************************************

    Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join over 402 Valued Subscribers and receive entertaining, encouraging posts PLUS 3 free gifts:

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Never Give Up

Joan Y. Edwards

 

 

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