Dr. Bob Rich Interviewed Me on His Bobbing Around Newsletter/Blog


Thanks for coming. It's so good to see you here.

Thanks for coming. It’s so good to see you here.

“Dr. Bob Rich Interviewed Me on His Bobbing Around Newsletter” by Joan Y. Edwards

I am very excited and honored that I’m the very first person he’s ever interviewed in his newsletter, Bobbing Around Lucky me.

“Interview with Joan Edwards: How to Build Up a Blog” by Dr. Bob Rich: http://bobrich18.wordpress.com/2014/02/14/interview-with-joan-edwards/

Free giveaway details are at the end of the post. Hmm. What am I giving away? Make your guess, then head on over and read the interview.  You must comment on Dr. Bob’s blog post interview to have a chance to win.

Thank you, Dr. Bob. Thank you, readers, for Bobbing on over there to read the interview.

In case you’d like to learn more about Dr. Bob, here’s a link to my interview with him on August 26, 2012.

Interview with Dr. Bob Rich: Writer, Mudsmith, Psychologist, and Editor: http://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/interview-with-dr-bob-rich-writer-mudsmith-psychologist-and-editor/

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2013 Joan Y. Edwards

And the Winner of Healing Waters by Joyce Moyer Hostetter Is…


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“And the Winner of Healing Waters by Joyce Moyer Hostetter Is…” by Joan Y. Edwards

Thank you to Joyce Moyer Hostetter for being a guest on my blog: Interview with Joyce Moyer Hostetter, Award-Winning Historical Fiction Writer. Thank you to all who read it. I really appreciate you and the people who shared wonderful praises in the comment area for Joyce and her books. It is indeed great that Joyce is willing to give a free autographed hardback copy of Healing Waters to one of the lucky people who left a comment. Below are the names of all the people who left a comment between January 29, 2014 and midnight February 7, 2014.

1.    Ann Eisenstein
2.    Linda Martin Andersen
3.    Vijaya
4.    Stephanie Caceres
5.    Sandra Warren
6.    Luann Martin
7.    Rosi
8.    Faith Hough
9.    Linda Vigen Phillips
10.    Bonnie J. Doerr
11.    Elizabeth Vollstadt
12.    Francis Can Mom
13.    Kathy Burkiinshaw

Carol Federlin Baldwin also left a comment, but did not wish to be included in the drawing.

Random.org chose #1. Therefore, Ann Eisenstein you won a free copy of Healing Waters. Congratulations! Please send your snail mail address to me at the contact address from the left-hand column.

Sorry that I was late posting this. It kept you in suspense. Good for writing. Not good for punctuality. It’s one of those times when I look in the mirror and discover that I’m human.

Jump over to Joyce’s blog to discover who won a copy of Healing Waters there:
HEALING WATER: We have a winner!

Celebrate you every day.
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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173 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as they are uploaded.

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Never Give Up
Joan

Linda Vigen Phillips – Writer of Prose and Poetry for Young Adults and Middle Grades


Copyright © 2013 Linda Vigen Phillips

Copyright © 2013 Linda Vigen Phillips

“Interview with Linda Vigen Phillips – Writer of Prose and Poetry for Young Adults and Middle Grades”

Linda, thanks for being a guest on my blog. It is a pleasure to interview you.

I have exciting news to share. I’m glad to be here.

Everyone’s anxious to hear your good news. Let’s get started!

1.   How did you do in English as a kid?

For me, it has always been about words as opposed to those mysterious things called numbers.  I honestly barely got into college because of my math scores!  In English I was a show-off from the get go.  I wrote a play “just for fun” in the fourth grade that my teacher made a big deal about.  I won some essay contests in high school.  I bombed on multiple choice tests and relished the essay parts.  English class, language arts, anything to do with words—always my favorite part of school.

2.  When did you decide to become an author?

Well,  I decided with the first diary someone gave me in grade school, but the rest of the world didn’t catch on for quite some time!

3.  What’s your favorite book?

Of course, this is always the hardest question to ask a writer because there are so many.  The one I identify the most with is Catcher in the Rye.  As a teacher I loved and used Hatchet the most for its wonderful description and narrative richness.  Most recently it’s The Book Thief.  By the way, speaking of the latter, it is one of the rare instances in which I thought the movie was almost as good as, if not equal to, the book.

4.  Are your characters based on real people?

Copyright © 2014  Linda Vigen Phillips and Eerdmans

Copyright © 2014 Linda Vigen Phillips and Eerdmans

My book, Crazy, is semi-autobiographical. Eerdmans will release it in October 2014. It is about a teenage girl coming to terms with her mother’s mental illness.  My mother suffered from bipolar disorder and I have drawn from actual events in my own life to shape the story.  Some of the minor characters are based on friends I knew growing up.  Don’t panic, girlfriends,  your names have all been changed and thanks to my editor, many of you have melded into composites!

5.  Did you outline and plan your book before you wrote it or did the story just flow on its own?

The book, Crazy, evolved from a collection of twenty poems that I wrote as a way of working through the feelings that resulted from my struggle with my mother’s illness. A number of these poems were originally published in adult literary journals.  I was considering putting them into a poetry chapbook when my writing buddy, Carol Baldwin, critiqued them and suggested that they needed to be a novel.  I took her advice, but to answer the question, I never specifically outlined the book.  It sort of spewed out like water from a faucet once I got going.

6.  How do you know when your manuscript is ready for submission?

Ah, don’t we all wish we knew the answer to that one!  Hopefully, if you are a serious writer, you have plugged into a critique group and/or workshops and conferences enough so that you have gotten considerable feedback from more than one source on your manuscript.  If you have not reached that saturation point, then your manuscript is probably not ready.  On the other end of the continuum, even when we are as ready as we can be, I think we writers tend to fret about our little darlings even as we hit the send button or drop that query in the mailbox.

7.  Who or what has been the most help and inspiration to you as a writer?

My association with the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) has most certainly been the biggest help and influence in my writing career.  Prior to my involvement with this organization I had plenty of ambition, but zero understanding of writing technique or the rules of the game.  Thanks to Fran Davis, beloved former RA of this region, I jumped in feet first and co-facilitated the 1998 conference in Charlotte with Carol Baldwin.  It was a great way to begin learning the trade and to see the importance of critique groups and networking with other writers.  It was all new to me, having been the reclusive closet poet for so many years.  And the bonus, of course, was finding life long friends like Carol.

As far as my book goes, I owe a debt of gratitude to Patti Gauch, retired senior editor at Philomel, who was my mentor at the 2009 Highlights Foundation Chautauqua Workshop.  She was instrumental in helping me find my YA voice and refine the raw story that I took to that workshop.

I am currently in the middle of revisions with my editor, Kathleen Merz, at Eerdmans and I am blown away with the editing process she is taking me through.  It is really the hardest work I have ever done on a writing project, and by far the most valuable.  It amazes me how she catches inconsistencies and parts that simply do not work well. I never would have caught them on my own.

8.  How did you obtain your agent?  Tell us about her.

My agent, Julia Kenny, is with Dunow, Carlson & Lerner. I found her on a random blog interview where I learned the type of material she was looking for. My heart leaped when it was definitely NOT dystopian, fantasy, or sci fi because up to that point, it seemed those were the genres everybody else was looking for. It was an instant fit, and she has been and continues to be a joy to work with. I got to meet her last year when I was in New York and that was a definite perk!

9.  What are you writing now?

My Work-in-Progress (WIP) represents a total departure from my debut book, in that it is MG, light-hearted, not in verse, with a male protagonist.  I’m currently debating the wisdom of not following up the debut book with something written in the same style, thanks to friendly advice from a fellow writer.  Be that as it may, here is the pitch:

Procrastination Pete must complete his science project during Spring Break at a castle where proving that a ghost doesn’t exist involves more than he bargains for.

For news about Crazy and Procrastination Pete stay tuned to my website http://www.lindavigenphillips.com (my blog is there, too)  and twitter @LVigenPhillips  where I am sure to hash through it in the future.

Bio:

Linda Phillips has taught lower and middle school students, as well as adults in writing courses online and in continuing education classes. (http://www.writing-world.com/poetry/children.shtml) Throughout her years of teaching, poetry writing has served as an important creative outlet. Her debut book, Crazy, is a YA novel written in verse about a teenage girl coming to terms with her mother’s mental illness. The book is semi-autobiographical, having evolved from a collection of poems originally written as a cathartic way to process the mental illness in her own family.  It is Linda’s hope that the book will speak to teens or adults whose lives have been affected by a loved one with mental illness. When she’s not writing, Linda can be found on the floor playing with the grandkids, or on the greenway, pedaling her ancient Raleigh 3-speed bike.

Other interviews of Linda:

Linda, thanks again for being a guest on my blog. It is so exciting that you not only have an agent, but have a book release coming soon.

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GIVEAWAY – DRAWING

Linda is offering a free critique of 2 poems  – no longer than 1 page for each poem to a lucky winner.  In order to put your name in the hat to win, leave a comment on this blog post before midnight Sunday, February 15, 2014. Random.org will choose the winner. I will announce it on Monday, February 16, 2014.

Celebrate you every day.
You are a gift to our world
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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172 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as they are uploaded.

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This interview with Linda Vigen Phillips is part of the Authors I Admire Series:

  1. 4RV Publishing – Vivian Zabel. “Vivian Zabel and 4RV Publishing
  2. Ann Eisenstein. Catch the Great Dialogue of Amazon Best-Selling Author, Ann Eisenstein
  3. Becky Shillington. Interview with Picture Book and Chapter Book Author, Becky Shillington
  4. Bob Rich, PhD. Interview with Dr. Bob Rich: Writer, Mudsmith, Psychologist, and Editor
  5. Carol Baldwin. Interview and Amazing Facts about Teacher and Author, Carol Baldwin
  6. Gretchen Griffith. Interview with Gretchn Griffith, Versatile and Talented  Author of Books for Children and Adults
  7. Jeff Herman. My Interview of Jeff Herman
  8. Joy Acey. Joy Acey Says Pub Sub Works (PubSub3rdFri)
  9. Juliana Jones. Top Ten Reasons I Love Being a Part of PubSub3rdFriday! by Juliana Jones
  10. Karen Cioffi-Ventrice. Interview with Karen Cioffi-Ventrice – Writing and Marketing Guru
  11. Linda Martin Andersen. Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author, Linda Martin Andersen
  12. Linda Martin Andersen. Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works
  13. Linda Martin Andersen. What Entices You to Submit Your Writing (PubSub)
  14. Joyce Moyer Hostetter. Interview with Joyce Moyer Hostetter – Award Winning Historical Fiction Writer
  15. Margaret Fieland Interview with Intriguing Sci-Fi Author and Editor, Margaret Fieland
  16. Maureen Wartski. In Memoriam: Interview with Maureen Wartski, Artist, Author, and Friend
  17. Megan Vance. Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author Megan Vance
  18. Nicole Thompson-Andrews. Nicole Thompson-Andrews Loves Pub Subbing
  19. Samantha Bell. An Interview with Samantha Bell – Impressive and Talented Author and Illustrator 
  20. Sandra Warren. Fascinating Ideas and Advice from Sandra Warren, Author

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Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author, Linda Martin Andersen


Linda Martin Andersen Linda with Military Cow Copyright © 2013  Linda Martin Andersen

Linda with Military Cow
Copyright © 2012
Linda Martin Andersen

“Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author, Linda Martin Andersen” by Joan Y. Edwards

Linda, thanks for agreeing to do a guest interview on my blog.

Thank you for inviting me to participate in your interview series.  I’ve enjoyed reading and learning from seasoned authors, and getting to know them and their works.

It’s an honor to have you here. I’m so glad I met you in 2005 on the email list of SCBWI-Carolinas. Thank you for being my friend.  I admire your writing skills and your ability to keep on going even when the times are tough. Let’s get started.

1.How did you do in English as a kid?

I loved literature, grammar, and composition.  The only thing about English that I did not like was poetry meter.  I think I must have been absent the day that was explained.  :)  I jest because I had perfect attendance from 3rd-12th grade.  I remember memorizing the meter of poems we studied.  It got me through.

2. When did you decide to become an author?

I took a creative writing course through the local community college when my children were in elementary school.  The instructor encouraged us to write, share, critique, and submit.  I sent out a few submissions, but none were purchased.  At that point, I decided I must be fooling myself.  It was years later before I truly began my writing journey.

3. What’s your favorite book? Why?

Ferdinand the Bull, a picture book by Munro Leaf and illustrated by Robert Lawson.  As a kid, I admired that Ferdinand didn’t try to be like all the other bulls.  He didn’t act in the expected way.  I enjoyed the book’s humor and simple illustrations. I ordered a personal copy from a school classroom book club order.  I cherished it for years.

4. Are your characters based on real people?

Some of my characters are based on real people.  That’s because I’ve written some published nonfiction stories.  My fictional pieces may be loosely based on individuals I know.  Sometimes, I choose characters names based on people I know.  I hold out hope that one day my niece and grandsons see their names published in one of my stories.

5. Did you outline and plan your books before you wrote them?

I would label myself a flexible plotter.  My plot plan changes during the writing of a rough draft.  I like to print my first draft and revise on the hardcopy.  Many times, I do this for second and third drafts.

6. How much research did you have to do for writing and/or publishing your books or manuscript in progress? What helped you in doing your research that others could benefit by your experience?

I set a goal to be published in a magazine in the Cobblestone series.  To be considered for a nonfiction writing assignment, I had to write a proposal and reveal the research sources I would use.  I used online data bases available from the local public library.  I found keyword searches invaluable.  Fortunately, one of my three proposals was accepted.  I was pleased.  In order to write two other nonfiction stories, I interviewed the people and studied links provided by them.  Even fiction stories sometimes require research.  Fortunately for me, I enjoy conducting research.

7. Did you cry while writing one of your books?

I cried when writing a nonfiction story about a nine-year-old girl who asked that in lieu of receiving birthday party gifts, donations be made to a local orphanage.  The birthday girl even donated the gift of money from her grandparents.  I was touched by her sincere compassion for others.  I also cried when writing a fiction manuscript about a character with a terminal illness.

8. What feelings do you have as you do the final edit for a book?

It is very satisfying to be near the end of a writing project.  There is a little sadness mixed in because now it’s time to move on to something else.  It’s a little like sending your child off to college.  You’re happy for him, but will miss him too.

9. What’s the funniest thing that ever happened to you related to your writing?

I was contracted to write teacher guides to accompany a subscription year of Cobblestone magazines.  When I discovered that one issue of the magazine was about the Brooklyn Bridge, not a variety of bridges, I didn’t think I would enjoy the project.  I was pleasantly surprised.  Not only did I enjoy the project, I was almost mesmerized by it.  I went on to read David McCullough’s book about building the Brooklyn Bridge and I watched a documentary by Ken Burns.  I was hooked.

10. What is your favorite genre?

I love picture books.  I like reading them for my own enjoyment, reading them to students, and I enjoy writing them.  I like taking workshops on building picture book writing skills.  I also like biographies of all lengths.

11. What are the 3 purposes of distinctive voice? How can we create a distinctive voice in our writing?

  • Distinctive voice makes characters believable.  Their strengths and weaknesses are revealed.  Not all good or all bad.
  • Distinctive voice reveals characters’ interests—adventuresome, athletic, geek, or others.
  • Distinctive voice reveals characters’ reactions to situations in the story.

I think one way to show a distinctive voice is to pretend to be looking over that character’s shoulder or shadowing him.  What would you notice that should be included in a manuscript?

12. What is your pet peeve about characterization?

Writers are encouraged to make each individual distinctive.  Sometimes, I think that’s hard because we generally tend to associate with people who are very much like we are.  If we create like characters in our stories, readers become disinterested.  That seems like a sort of paradox to me.

13. What did you do to celebrate your first check for writing published magazine activities for children?

In 2005 when I received my first check for published magazine activities for children, I celebrated by taking a special ride in a 1929 Model A car.  I invited my family to join me. We were driven on our dirt driveway and on paved streets by the car’s owner.  What fun!  I especially enjoyed sharing the ride with my grandsons.

Copyright 2005 Linda Martin Andersen

Copyright 2005 Linda Martin Andersen

13. How do you know when a manuscript is ready for submission?

When it’s “done.”  Get it?  Can’t you almost hear the oven timer going off?  I couldn’t resist answering with a pun.  I do like to jest.

Jesting about cooking led me to think of recipes and we all know there’s really no “one recipe” for writing.  Okay, now for my true answer—when I read over a manuscript and no parts call out, “Fix me.”  Then it’s time to submit.  That’s only after numerous revisions and suggestions from a critique group.

14. Who or what has been the most help and inspiration to you as a writer?

My online critique group has been most helpful with my writing skills.  They inspire me to send my writing to them for critique and to submit for publication when my work is polished.  Joan Edwards, yes, the host of this blog and my very good friend, has answered many technology questions and helped me develop blogging skills. She has also encouraged me on my writing journey.  Thanks, Joan. (You’re welcome, Linda.)

15. What are you writing now?

I am writing two picture book manuscripts about bedtime.  I plan to send one of them out soon.

16. Why do you like to write?

Writing fills me with joy.  I plan to make it a part of my life for as long as I live.  I have always enjoyed writing even when others did not.  I recall that one of my elementary teachers required the class to write a story each week using our spelling list.  Moaning erupted, but not from me.  I loved the challenge and looked forward to reading my story to the class.  Even though my teacher never exclaimed, “You should be a writer when you grow up,” I didn’t let that discourage me.  She didn’t say, I shouldn’t.

17. I love the picture of you and the cow. What’s the story behind this picture?

The Cow Parade of 2012 was held in the triangle area of N.C. – http://cowparadenc.com/about.  Local artists painted 81 fiberglass cows to benefit N.C. Children’s Hospital.  The paratrooper cow was placed in Fayetteville, N.C. near Ft. Bragg.

A short bio

Linda Martin Andersen is married with two grown sons and two grandsons. Her work experience is in elementary education as a school counselor and as a reading teacher. Her passion is writing for children. She created stories and articles that were published in Pockets, Guide, and AppleSeeds magazines.  She is also published in Christian curriculum and teacher guides for Cobblestone magazines. She created pre-K and K activities, poems, and piggyback songs for Celebrate and Adventures Christian magazines.  For ten years she created activities for the children’s bulletin for First Presbyterian in Fayetteville, North Carolina. She wrote educational “Tips for Parents” for The Fayetteville Observer from 2005-2006.

She is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators and attends their workshops and conferences regularly. She is thankful for her SCBWI and writer friends..

Teacher’s guide “The Great Bridge” for Cobblestone magazine on the Brooklyn Bridge–March 2010 https://cobblestonepub.com/pdfs/COB/COB1003.pdf

Linda wrote Cobblestone teacher guides for two subscription years.  This issue was selected because of her response to the question about something funny that happened.  See question #9.

Published magazine stories:

  • “Little Willie Sherman” for AppleSeeds magazine ( November/December 2011)
  • “A Different Kind of Party” for Pockets magazine (January 2012)
  • “Whistling in the Spotlight” for Guide magazine ( November 10, 2012)

Linda on the Web:

Linda’s blog: A Writer’s Playground – www.lindamartinandersen.wordpress.com

Here are three great posts on Linda’s blog:

Here are five blog posts that Linda believes you will enjoy

  1.  Carol Baldwin—book reviews and writing tips
    http://www.carolbaldwinblog.blogspot.com/2014/01/prisoner-of-night-and-fog-and-giveaway.html
  1.  Joy Acey—Poetry for Kids Joy–a poem a day (topic—bullying)
    http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/2014/01/dealing.html
  1.  Joyce Hostetter—book reviews, research, and interviews
    http://joycemoyerhostetter.blogspot.com/2013/12/q-with-kathryn-erskine-author-of-seeing.html
  1. Joan Y. Edwards—writing tips, interviews, motivation, and more
    http://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2014/01/20/in-memoriam-interview-with-maureen-wartski-artist-author-and-friend/

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LINDA HAS A BOOK GIVEAWAY CHANCE FOR YOU:

Answer the following question in the comment area: What would Robin, Batman’s sidekick, say if he saw this picture of me with the cow?

In your comment, say, HOLY COW!  OR ONE OF ROBIN’S GREAT WORDS, PLEASE. IT’LL MAKE LINDA SMILE.

Write your response in the comment section before midnight Friday, February 14, 2014 and to enter to win a free copy of a Batman and Robin paperback book called Fright Club. Linda said, “My grandson loves Batman and Robin. This inspired my giveaway. Hopefully, you’re a fan or know one.”

Random.org will choose the winner. Joan will announce the winner on Saturday, February 15, 2014. Please include your email address so we can contact the winner.

Thank you, Linda for being a guest on my blog and sharing your sense of humor and writing tips with us.

Celebrate you every day.
You are a gift to our world
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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173 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as they are uploaded. 

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This interview with Linda Martin Andersen is part of the Authors I Admire Series:

  1. 4RV Publishing – Vivian Zabel. “Vivian Zabel and 4RV Publishing
  2. Ann Eisenstein. Catch the Great Dialogue of Amazon Best-Selling Author, Ann Eisenstein
  3. Becky Shillington. Interview with Picture Book and Chapter Book Author, Becky Shillington
  4. Bob Rich, PhD. Interview with Dr. Bob Rich: Writer, Mudsmith, Psychologist, and Editor
  5. Carol Baldwin. Interview and Amazing Facts about Teacher and Author, Carol Baldwin
  6. Gretchen Griffith. Interview with Gretchn Griffith, Versatile and Talented  Author of Books for Children and Adults
  7. Jeff Herman. My Interview of Jeff Herman
  8. Joy Acey. Joy Acey Says Pub Sub Works (PubSub3rdFri)
  9. Juliana Jones. Top Ten Reasons I Love Being a Part of PubSub3rdFriday! by Juliana Jones
  10. Karen Cioffi-Ventrice. Interview with Karen Cioffi-Ventrice – Writing and Marketing Guru
  11. Linda Martin Andersen. Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works
  12. Linda Martin Andersen. What Entices You to Submit Your Writing (PubSub)
  13. Joyce Moyer Hostetter. Interview with Joyce Moyer Hostetter – Award Winning Historical Fiction Writer
  14. Margaret Fieland Interview with Intriguing Sci-Fi Author and Editor, Margaret Fieland
  15. Maureen Wartski. In Memoriam: Interview with Maureen Wartski, Artist, Author, and Friend
  16. Megan Vance. Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author Megan Vance
  17. Nicole Thompson-Andrews. Nicole Thompson-Andrews Loves Pub Subbing
  18. Samantha Bell. An Interview with Samantha Bell – Impressive and Talented Author and Illustrator 
  19. Sandra Warren. Fascinating Ideas and Advice from Sandra Warren, Author

And the Winner of a Free Book from Gretchen Griffith is…


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“And the Winner of a Free Book from Gretchen Griffith is…” by Joan Y. Edwards

Thank you to the 12 people who left a comment for the Interview with Gretchen Griffith, Versatile and Talented Author of Books for Children and Adults. You help make my blog interactive and more meaningful.

  1. Molly Jones
  2. Mona Pease
  3. Susanne Drazic
  4. Sandra Warren
  5. Carol Federlin Baldwin
  6. Brenda Madole
  7. Rosi Hollinbeck
  8. Joyce Moyer Hostetter
  9. Linda Martin Andersen
  10. Susan Lovins Lackey
  11. Ann Eisenstein
  12. Gloria Glenn

I asked Random.org to choose a number between 1 and 12. It chose #8. Therefore, Joyce Moyer Hostetter won a free copy of one of Gretchen’s books.

Joyce, you stated in your comment that you would like a copy of Lessons Learned. You can change your mind, if you like. Please send me your snail mail address and the title of Gretchen’s book you choose to my contact address in the left-hand column. I will forward it to Gretchen.

Thank you very much.

Celebrate you every day.
You are a gift to our world
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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173 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as she posts them.

Who’s Talking? Can You Tell by the Dialogue?


“Who’s Talking? Can You Tell by the Dialogue?” by Joan Y. Edwards

Look at one of your manuscripts. Is each character’s voice different? Can your readers tell who’s talking? Does each character speak with a different voice. A voice that is distinctive.

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Does the dialogue indicate every aspect of his character so that no one would mistake his words as coming from another character? Does a character’s traits show in the dialogue he speaks?

Ali Luke says one good trick is to take just the lines of dialogue in your short story or novel – cut out the action and dialogue tags (he said, she said) – and see whether you can figure out who said what.

You can even hand your BETA READER a copy. According to Wikipedia, a BETA READER is a person who reads a written work before its publication to find and improve elements such as grammar and spelling, as well as suggestions to improve the story, its characters, or its setting. Your critique groups are BETA READERS. However, when I’ve heard BETA READER used, it is a special person chosen by the author to give them feedback on a whole book before the author submits it to an editor or agent.

Ask a reader to read the pages of dialogue and write in who was talking for each. Readers should be able to tell that a different person is talking. If they know the characters and their character traits, they’ll have a better chance of figuring out who is talking.

If you don’t have access to a reader, read it yourself. Check it yourself with a chapter from your latest manuscript. Take out the “he said, she said” dialogue tags. You can even go so far as to take out the action, too.

From doing this you’ll realize the importance of giving each character distinct speech patterns and unique character traits. If all of your characters sound like they came out of the same box, creative revision might be a good idea.

Ali Luke gave some ideas for creating distinctive dialogue for characters and I added a few of my own:

  • How Old Is the Character: a teen and grandpa don’t talk the same way
  • Gender: male and female characters won’t use the same vocabulary
  • Socio/economic class: Is your character from the slums or rich with money and worldly goods?
  • Education level: Does the character use a small or big vocabulary? Can you tell he didn’t finish high school?
  • Where Does He Live: Can you tell where they live by their words? Can you tell their native language?
  • Pet Words/Phrases: Does one of your characters have a pet word, phrase, or expression? OMG, You don’t say!
  • Personality Traits: Do his words indicate that the character is stingy? dumb? smarter than a dictionary? Chatty versus man of few words?
  • What does the Character Want? Money, fame, independence, freedom, or something else?
  • What does the Character Need? Confidence, love, power or something else?

References:

  1. Ali Luke. “10 Easy Ways to Improve Your Dialogue:” http://writetodone.com/10-easy-ways-to-improve-your-dialogue/Think about
  2. Beth Kinderman and Nikki Walker. “The 100 Most Important Things To Know About Your Character (revised):” http://www.miniworld.com/adnd/100ThingsAboutUrPCBackGround.html
  3. Story Jumper.com. “StoryStarter – Telling your story in 7 steps:” http://www.storyjumper.com/main/starter

Thank you for reading my blog. I appreciate you very much. Please leave a comment. I love hearing from you.

Celebrate you every day.
You are a gift to our world
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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Over 100,000 Views – Wow! How Exciting! Thank You


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“Over 100,000 Blog Views – Wow! How Exciting! Thank you” by Joan Y. Edwards

On Wednesday, February 5, 2014 I passed 100,000 blog views. I bow humbly to all who have read my blog. I never dreamed that so many wonderful people would read my blog. I never dreamed that I would meet so many delightful people by writing my blog. On October 9, 2009 when I started this blog, the only thing I knew was that I wanted to help inspire people to never give up on themselves.

Today I would like for you to help me celebrate.

  • Do something fun that you’ve put off for a long time.
  • Try something new that you’ve been afraid of doing.
  • Watch your favorite movie.
  • Write a story telling a funny experience you had growing up.

Linda Martin Andersen asked if I’d do a writing a novel workshop this year. I’m working on the details to offer a “Write a Novel with Me Workshop.” I don’t know when, nor the the cost yet, but I know that it will have:

  1. Pitch – Short Summary (logline)
  2. Outline with plot points
  3. Characterization
  4. How to begin and end chapters
  5. Tension on every page
  6. Dialogue showing distinctive voice of each character
  7. When to Get Your Work Critiqued
  8. How to Revise
  9. Where to Submit

Three cheers for my readers!
RAH RAH RAH
OLE OLE OLE

Celebrate you every day.
You are a gift to our world
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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