12 Causes of Mistakes That Create Less than Perfect Characters


Create Less Than Perfect Characters

Create Less Than Perfect Characters

“12 Causes of Mistakes That Create Less than Perfect Characters” by Joan Y. Edwards

In order to create less than perfect characters, each character must have a flaw. It’s okay to dream up a character with more than one flaw. Brainstorming your character with different types of flaws may help you decide which one creates the most havoc for him in his particular situation. You could group three primary flaws that are characteristic of one particular gigantic shortcoming for your character. However, you may want one flaw that signals their defining trait.

Flaw, according to the Google dictionary, is a mark, fault, or other imperfection that mars a substance or object. For example: The outlet store sold plates with flaws in them. Synonyms for flaw are defect, blemish, fault, imperfection, deficiency, weakness, weak spot/point/link, inadequacy, shortcoming, limitation, failing, or foible.

In 1993, to focus attention and resources to eliminate accidents and human error, Gordon Dupont, a worker in maintenance for Transport Canada developed the following Dirty Dozen list of causes for human mistakes at work: http://www.skybrary.aero/index.php/The_Human_Factors_%22Dirty_Dozen%22

  1. Lack of communication
  2. Distraction
  3. Lack of Resources
  4. Stress
  5. Complacency – a feeling of quiet pleasure or security, unaware of potential danger, defect, or the like.
  6. Lack of Teamwork
  7. Pressure (of deadline)
  8. Lack of Awareness
  9. Lack of Knowledge
  10. Fatigue
  11. Lack of Assertiveness-don’t feel free or not allowed to speak up
  12. Norms-the way you’ve always done it

These could cause life-changing situations for your characters. But you don’t want your characters to get hurt. I understand. About 6 years ago, Pam Zollman told writers you have to hurt your “bunnies” (characters).  Oh my goodness! As a writer you may be a “Mother Hen or “Protective Father” and don’t want anything to happen to your little ones. However, to have a plot, to have a story at all, means that you must create something bad to happen to your main character. That’s bad, spelled and pronounced B-a-a-a-a-d. After the bad experience, watch him meet the challenge. I promise you that your character will meet any challenge you give him. He will make it out of the darkest corner. With your help, how can he fail?

To look at the dark side, the darkest corners of films, watch a few film noir from the 1940′s to late 1950′s. The Guardian lists the Top 10 Film Noir movies and a summary of each one and why it was good. Film noir was usually in black and white. It may have been an American Detective or crime film that emphasized cynical attitudes and sexual motivations. It seemed to me that no character in a film noir ever reached the good side of human behavior. One person, the detective who solved the mystery, may have been the only one on the right side. According to Fandor, the noir style has expressionism and realism with night scenarios, strong shadows, low-key lighting, dynamic compositions, hard-boiled dialogue, flashbacks, fragmented narratives, and fluid camera movements.

One of the many I’ve seen on AMC is Out of the Past (1947).

A private eye escapes his past to run a gas station in a small town, but his past catches up with him. Now he must return to the big city world of danger, corruption, double crosses and duplicitous dames.

But it could have been one of many. Film Noir present a pretty bleak view of our world. Consider this pitch description of Blackout:

A down-and-out American visits London and meets a beautiful blonde who offers him a fortune to marry her. He quickly agrees but the next day he awakens in an artist’s studio covered with blood and his supposed father-in-law’s corpse!

Many times in life, the story behind the story is intriguing and goes to the dark side. For instance, the movie Captain Phillips (2013)

The true story of Captain Richard Phillips and the 2009 hijacking by Somali pirates of the US-flagged MV Maersk Alabama, the first American cargo ship hijacked in two hundred years.

Some of the men in the crew with Captain Phillips contend that Captain Phillips shouldn’t have taken them there in the first place and have claimed a lawsuit against the real Captain Phillips. Now that would make another good movie.

Reverse the usual for your characters. What if everyone in your story except one person was evil…not just one flaw, they had all flaws except for one good redeeming trait. See what kind of story you get.

For instance, there’s a robbery in town. Everyone helps the robber get away. Why? It’s sad to think about, but what if the world was that way. He had them so believing in him that they couldn’t believe he did it. He had charisma personified. But one character could see through all the songs and dances and convict the robber.

When you write a story, you get to create a world that might be hard to imagine…a sad, tragic, magic, or joyful world. But it’s your story with your main character with many flaws, three flaws, or only one flaw. A flaw is what gets him into trouble. A flaw is what gets him into deeper depths of despair. Only when your character is brave and wise enough to see things differently is he able to think of a way out of his bottomless pit. You have a choice of a happy ending or an ending that you drape in the perils of tragedy.

I thought by looking at these 12 causes of mistakes and glancing at the dark side might help you decide which flaw is “perfect” for your character(s) in your story to make him memorable.

Here are a few first sentence story-starters or character sketches:

  1. Everyone in his family for generations has been trustworthy. But not, Ned Parker.
  2. A leader needs good communication, but the President of the United States did not have good communication on the day when the people of Zamboo declared war.
  3. Everyone cringed to think that the airplane built by Forever Airlines had not had the suggested maintenance inspections and repairs. Whose fault was it that maintenance orders were not carried out? Who is going to pay for the deaths caused when Flight 513 went down on I-95?
  4. James couldn’t focus on his job as a taxi driver. He worried about his grandfather. He worried about his son in school. Most of all, he worried about his bank account. He didn’t notice the lady walking out from two parked cars.
  5. Teresa was unaware of the faulty electrical cord she used to turn on her hair dryer. She never checked her surroundings. She took it for granted that everything was going to be fine and that electrical outlets stay good for a lifetime.  The day her hair frizzed and the shock went through her body, was the day she became paranoid about safety.

Please leave a comment. I’d love to hear what you think.

Enjoy your writing!
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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Delightful Interview with Joy Acey, the Princess of Poetry


“Delightful Interview with Joy Acey, the Princess of Poetry” by Joan Y. Edwards

Joy Acey as a baby Copyright © 2014 Joy Acey

Joy Acey as a baby
Copyright © 2014 Joy Acey

“Delightful Interview with Joy Acey, the Princess of Poetry” by Joan Y. Edwards

Joy, thank you for being a guest on my blog. You are a fun person. I know they’ll enjoy learning about you and your writing tips, too.

You’re welcome. I’m excited to be here with you and your readers. Let’s get started.

1.  How did you do in English as a kid?

Oh, I wish I could say I was a brilliant student, but I wasn’t. For some reason, I grew up with the image of myself as a B student. I can remember in fifth grade, my teacher Mr. Rainbow would give us a practice spelling test on Wednesday and a final one on Friday. If we got 100% on Wednesday’s test, we didn’t have to take the test on Friday. Oh, I loved the idea of that. The fairness of it. So, for the first half of the year I’d study really hard on Monday and Tuesday. I’d ace the test on Wednesday and I’d smugly read my reading book on Friday while the rest of the class (except for about four others) would struggle through the test. Man, I had perfect scores, and the funny thing was my friend Helen’s mother would give us a practice test first thing on Wednesday morning. We walked to school together and her mother wouldn’t let us leave until Helen finished the test. So, Wednesday morning I’d know what needed extra work and I’d concentrate on that and ace the test. Poor Helen would struggle like the dickens, and I just didn’t understand why she had so many troubles. (What kind of friend was I?) So after doing this for half a year, I’d proven to myself that I could do this and it didn’t seem worth the effort after that. So I slacked off, got lazy and I’ve never been a great speller since then.

The same was true with math. Third grade we had timed tests and we could go out to play when we finished the weekly test. Well, the weather got cold and I didn’t want to go out to play, so I took my time and wrote really neatly, showed all my work, double checked, and it took me forever to finish the test. I do remember once in fifth grade, for Halloween, I took my math problems and I put one for the stem, one for each eye, and one problem for the nose, etc. I carefully numbered each problem so my teacher could follow what I was doing. I got my paper back with an F on it and a note to re-do the work. My teacher was unwilling to follow my pattern to find the answers and so it wasn’t easy for her to follow the key from her book. I wasn’t going to re-do the work that was correct and creatively done in the first place. After that I wasn’t going to try to please that teacher. Can you see my problem here? Oh, I was a difficult child. I was constantly testing boundaries and trying to make new rules.

I’ve always been left-handed and so my handwriting was not terribly neat growing up. When I was in Jr. High we got grades for penmanship and my mother said, enough was enough of my sloppy ways. I had to do two pages of penmanship before I could go out to play. I do have fairly neat handwriting, although no one cares about that with computers now and it isn’t even taught any more. All those pages of loops and slants—lost.

I did have a unique childhood. My mom was a single mom when I was little. She taught first grade. When I was in fourth grade Mom married the manager of a drive-in theater where she had a part-time job as bookkeeper. My step-father got transferred to El Centro, California to manage a drive-in theater there. Mom taught school all day and worked at the drive-in at night. My sister and I would either babysit ourselves or we’d go to the drive-in with our folks. I saw a lot of movies and learned a lot about writing: show don’t tell, character development, plotting, and visual presentation.

When I was 14, I got my work permit and I started earning my own money. In high school I wrote for the school newspaper. In my English classes, we split grades for creativity and execution. I always got A+ for creativity and B for the execution. Commas and spelling always brought my grades down. Plus I liked to make up words. A great number of my papers came back with a note “This word isn’t in the dictionary.” I’ll bet a lot of my words would have been in Oxford English Dictionary (OED) but this was before the days of computers and on-line dictionaries. I still love making up words to fit specific situations.  I think that is part of the reason I love being a poet because the creativity is supported in that genre.

Joy Acey and her older sister, November 1948 Copyright © 1948-2014  Joy Acey

Joy Acey and her older sister, November 1948
Copyright © 1948-2014 Joy Acey

2.  When did you decide to become a children’s poet?

I’m not sure anyone decides to be a children’s poet. You’re born to it. As Bernice Cullinan (founding editor of Wordsong, the poetry imprint of Boyd Mills Press) once said to me, in a voice that almost sounded like it held pity, “If that is what comes out of your pen, then that is what you must write.” I really have to control my writing to write prose. To NOT put that galloping rhythm in and to NOT make the lines rhyme. I have to really be careful to NOT use reversals, just so I can make the writing rhyme. At times it is a burden, but most of the time it is good fun. I often see how the lines should look on the page. And strangely enough, all of my education and life experiences have helped to make me a better children’s poet.

I have a Ph.D. in human communication and I approach my poems from the question of, “What am I trying to say?” What is the best way to say this? What is the purpose of the writing and how is the best way to present this so the reader can read the poem the way I mean it to be interpreted.

3.      What’s your favorite book? Why?

I have a whole shelf of poetry books I love. I have a collection of textbooks on writing poetry in various forms, and dictionaries. I love some of my current collections of poetry books for children. I guess my favorite is The Poetry Friday Anthology. I feel so honored to be included in this anthology with all the great children’s poets that Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong assembled.

I recently read THE POEM THAT WILL NOT END by Joan Bransfield Graham published by Two Lions Press with Krysten Brooker as the illustrator. It is a picture book for kids with several poetry forms explained. It is a cool textbook and story at the same time.

4.  Are your characters based on real people?

Nope, if I have a character in a poem, it usually is a reflection of me or my idealized child. Sometimes it is fun to use an animal—then I’ll look at the characteristics I’m dealing with and select an animal to represent the characteristics. Size and shape of the animal often has something to do with it. I don’t often write about rabbits or bunnies because they don’t make a lot of sound.

Joy Acey and Older Sister in Easter Dresses Copyright 2014 Joy Acey

Joy Acey and Older Sister in Easter Dresses
Copyright 2014 Joy Acey

5. Do you outline your poems before you write them or do they flow on their own?

Writing poetry is all about flexing muscles. It is like having a tool box and being able to put more tools into it. I often decide that I want to try writing a form, say a luc bau, or a fib, or tanka. Then I try to think of something that will fit nicely into that form of poetry. If I’m tired of writing poems in common verse (rhyming quatrains), I’ll see if I can write the poem in a different form. Often, I try a new form that I haven’t ever used. That’s one of the things I like about writing children’s poetry. It never gets boring because there is always something new to learn and to try.

6.  How much research do you do for writing your poems? 

I actually do a lot of research. The best idea is to keep your eyes and ears open at all times. You never know when you’ll see or hear something that will inspire a poem. I’m constantly double-checking the information I include in poems to make sure that it is correct. When I wrote science poems for an anthology recently, I was busy asking all my science friends what they thought were important subjects for children to know about. What were topics I should be writing about? I also checked Common Core and State learning standards to write appropriate poems for the grade level I was aiming for.

Research is one of the fun things about writing poetry. You can write a short couplet to illustrate a single thought. You don’t have to invest in long chapters like a novel. I’m constantly chatting with my local librarians about their books and their knowledge about children. I frequently ask my librarian: “Do you have a book about________?” I need to know if someone has already covered the subject, or if there is a way I can have a different approach. See how much fun this can be?

7.  Do you ever cry while writing poems?

Yes, of course. For a poem to be successful, I need to be able to convey the right emotion, if it’s sad. But, I also think children should have laughter in their childhood, so I often laugh about something silly I put into a poem. I do laugh at myself a lot. When a poem seems to be a “little crazy,” I brainstorm to see how I can “up” its silliness factor. I have many fantastic followers who frequently have fun ideas for poems that they share with me. It is fun to write those poems, too.

8.  Do you have trouble saying goodbye to your poems?

Nope, because I know a poem is never really finished. I’m more likely to become bored with a poem than to want to keep it with me.

Joy Acey, Kindergarten Copyright © 2014 Joy Acey

Joy Acey, Kindergarten
Copyright © 2014 Joy Acey

9.   What’s your favorite poem you’ve written?

Oh gracious, that is a difficult question! I’ve probably written over 5,000 poems. I’m constantly writing and sometimes I even forget that I’ve written a poem because I’ve moved on. I think my favorites are poems I can make into a game. I also like the call and response poems that take many children to perform the poem. I like it when a poem sets up a pattern. Then I can write multiple poems using the same structure. Or, more likely, I like to encourage someone else to write a poem using my structure. That is the MOST fun for me, when I can get someone else to play poetry games with me.

10.  What’s the funniest thing that ever happened to you related to your writing or book tours?

My editor asked if I’d like to make a video of me reciting my poem in an anthology, and I had the funniest time getting the job done. I was using the camera on my phone and I taped the camera to my garage because the editor wanted the background to be outdoors. But half way through the taping, the camera fell off the garage because the tape wouldn’t stick well to the stucco wall. Then when I got all set to do it again, I got an error message on my phone because it was too hot and my phone needed to cool off. It really was funny to me. I kept thinking, where are my kids when I need them. I have two grown sons, one lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and the other in Seattle, Washington. I could have used them to do the recording.

11.  What is your favorite genre?

The more and more I write, I know that I’m supposed to be writing poetry. Specifically, poetry for children. It is my small little corner of the world. And now that I’m writing with a “body of work,” I’m developing stronger tastes in what I like and don’t like. I’m getting more and more specific in my writing skills.

Joy Acey, 1st Grade Silhouette Copyright © 2014 Joy Acey

Joy Acey, 1st Grade Silhouette
Copyright © 2014 Joy Acey

12.  How can a writer create a distinctive voice?

Write for yourself and your own distinctive voice will ring loud and clear. Don’t worry about a distinctive voice. Just write what you know and your voice will come through in the writing. If you end up channeling Dr. Seuss, or Emily Dickinson—you’ll hear that and be ready to get rid of writing for someone else.

13. How do you decide the right narrator for a poem? 1st, 2nd, or 3rd person?  This is the fun part of writing poetry. You can write a poem in a particular subject from each narrator voice and end up with three different poems.

14. How do you check your manuscript for proper formatting?

Proper formatting is one of the fun areas of poetry. You get to set your own format and rules and then follow the rules! Poetry is constantly changing.

It used to be in Elizabethan times they capitalized every new line. Heck, if you read some of the original Emily Dickerson poems you’ll see that she capitalized every noun in the Germanic tradition. But now poets look at enjambed lines and some, like me, only use a capital to signal to the reader that a new sentence is beginning. When poets started using computers, the computer automatically would print a capital after each hard return for a line break. So a lot of poetry at that time had caps at the start of each line.

If you read a lot of early picture books you’ll notice that a lot of publishers still do this with phrasing, every time there is a return, the line starts with a capital letter.

I personally don’t think this helps children with learning the rules of punctuation. It used to be that each line ended in punctuation too. I question each punctuation mark that goes into a poem. What does it tell the reader in how to read the poem? See, I view that old fashioned way of starting each line with a capital letter as being lazy. I don’t know how many times I’ve asked other poets why they started each line with a capital letter and I get the response, “It’s just the way my computer did it.” That isn’t thinking about the poem and the meaning of the words. Your job as a poet is to let the reader know how the poem is supposed to be read. This is like the rule that changed between having two or one spaces after each period, or as the Brits would say, after each full-stop.

So, the formatting of a poem should enhance the meaning of the poem and help the reader to interpret how to read the poem. This is part of the reason poets have fun with concrete poems and caesuras—the formatting gets to add to the meaning and the experience of the poem for the reader.

One of the things a poet needs to do is take risks and be inventive.  This keeps the poems “fresh.”  Here are some examples on my playing with poetry, playing with form:
http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/2013/03/desert-theatre.html

Here is an example of quatrains that I have revamped to make it easier for the reader to read and to make the poem more visually interesting.  http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/2013/10/riding-my-imagination.html

Here is the way the poem could have been presented:

RIDING MY IMAGINATION

My bus is a chariot,
A magical sleigh,
A yellow banana
To take me away.

Using capital letters with every hard return is old-fashioned, and doesn’t help a child with learning to read. It is one of the things I feel strongly about–a poem should help to expand the child’s world.

RIDING MY IMAGINATION

My bus
is a chariot,
a magical sleigh,
a big yellow banana,
to lift me away.

I’m a goldfinch flying.
It’s really too cool.
My imagination soaring
as I land at school.
…Joy Acey

This same logic of formatting holds for using center margin.  Some poets use center margin because they think it “looks pretty.”  This logic doesn’t help children with learning to read.  The only reason a poem should use center margin is if the topic of the poem is about something central, or holding things in.  I recently saw a poem about the wind that used central margin and it looked all wrong to me.  A wind is a breezy, flowing thing and that poem needs the text to show the windy nature, not to hold everything to a central core.

Formatting does make a difference.  My poem, “Worm,” can be read from top to bottom; or bottom to top. An illustration adds to the fun and information flow of the poem:
http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/2013/08/worm.html

The written word and the visual is a wedding.  The two must serve each other. I formatted my poem, “Waves,” to show the movement of the waves in the ocean and how they fall when they get to the beach area:
http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/2013/08/waves.html

The next two poems, “Sun” and “Moon” were an interesting revelation for me.  I first wrote them in a traditional left to right fashion:
http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/2013/07/sun.html
http://poetryforkidsjoy.blogspot.com/2013/07/moon.html

But since the sun and moon both rise in the east, I later revised the words with the visual so that the poem read right to left because the east is usually on the right side on maps. But, I didn’t think the poem was successful because it asked children to read in a backward direction.  See not all of my poems are successful.

Part of the fun of writing poetry is that I can easily revise and change a poem.  The more I write the more fun I have with my writing.  The writing is a learning process.  I’m learning not only about poetry, I’m learning about myself.  And I’m learning about what I like (and what I don’t like) in children’s poetry.  The poem is the way I share with children the many things I know, the experiences I’ve had.

15. How do you find and replace your “Pet Words,” the words that you use too many times?”

I am careful not to use the same word families for rhyming poems. It is easy to overwork certain words. Therefore, I have a rhyming dictionary that I use a lot. Sometimes I open a page and challenge myself to write a rhyming poem with the words on that entry where my finger lands.

16. How do you check and change incorrect spelling?

This is my bête noir. I rely heavily on the computer’s spell check software. But I do need to remember to look for the squiggly red lines the computer shows under misspelled words. I run into problems using foreign words, like bête noir.

Sometimes I make mistakes with their, there, they’re or were and we’re. I know the rules and I know what I should use, but unless I consciously check, I sometimes type the wrong word. I feel so stupid when I catch myself, or feel even worse if someone else points it out. That is what critique groups are for—to be another pair of eyes. I sure appreciate my critique group.

17. How do you know when your manuscript is ready for submission?

Most of the time, I don’t know when a manuscript is ready for submission. I recently submitted a collection of 28 poems on one topic and afterwards I thought of (and wrote) five more poems. My brain at least wasn’t ready to leave the topic and move on. So, I figure I’ll wait and see what happens with the submission. I’ll make changes before I submit it again. If the publisher accepts the poem collection, I’ll talk to the editor about moving poems around and adding the new ones.

See, this is the fun stuff poets get to do. I’ve never had a poem accepted that the editor didn’t have suggestions for changes. Usually, the revised poem turns out to be stronger. I love working with editors. They are really creative people and have brilliant suggestions. I’ve loved working with Kathleen Hayes at Highlight’s High Five and Janet Wong at Pomelo Books.

18.  Who or what has been the most help and inspiration to you as a writer?

Oh, my goodness. I’ve been writing for so long that I’ve gotten a lot of help from a lot of people. I’d have to say I owe so much to Bee Cullinan who really was the person who gave me permission to write poetry.

Then I probably should give credit to the nasty poetry professor at the University of North Carolina who wouldn’t let me take his introductory poetry class. I was so frustrated and upset over that. I cried for at least a week over that.

But thankfully, Marcia Douglas at NC State University let me take her class and I learned so much—she also was instrumental in getting me a job teaching poetry at their summer Young Writers Workshops.

Andy Boyles was instrumental in getting my first children’s poem sold to Highlights. I’ve attended many of the poetry workshops at Highlights. I recommend them highly. I’ve made some long-lasting poetry buds through the workshops.

Kathleen Hayes, editor of High Five and HELLO, has done special things with my poems to get them to more children to read and hear.

Plus, the illustrators for the poems have been wonderful. David Harrison has contributed greatly to my education and Janet Wong and Sylvia Vardell have published several of my poems in their anthologies.

Sylvia Vardell’s blog helps to keep me current in my reading, letting me know about recently published children’s poetry books. I do hang out with the Poetry Friday poets and I learn a lot from them.

Tabatha Yeatts has had poem exchanges over the last two summers and at Christmas. I’ve made some good poetry friends through that—Linda Baile, Laura Purdie Salas, Amy Ludwig Vanderwater, Becky Shillington, Buffy Silverthorn, and Robyn Hood Black.

I guess everywhere I turn I find people to help me along my journey—like you Joan, and Linda Andersen and many of my friends in the Carolinas.

One more thing I want to mention. At the last Highlights poetry workshop, Rebecca Davis, editor for Wordsong, talked about the difficulty of finding illustrators for poetry. And it was an eye opener for me. Poetry doesn’t sell as well as fictional picture books. So an illustrator is going to make less money doing art for a poetry collection than for a picture book. As a poet, you do have to ask yourself the question of why an illustrator would want to do your illustrations. It is something to keep in mind.

Joy’s Bio:

Joy Acey, the Princess of Poetry, has won many prizes for her poems and has published in several small journals and anthologies including HIGHLIGHT’S High Five magazine. She is a performance artist and conducts writing workshops for children and adults. She’s hopped a freight train and rode in a boxcar over the world’s second largest wooden trestle bridge. She was on a TV game show and won enough money for a trip to Australia. She has lived in England and Japan. She has walked across a volcano in Hawaii and a glacier in New Zealand. She has gone swimming with iguanas in the Galápagos and was in Ecuador during a revolution. She recently returned from a trip to Peru where she visited the rainforest. Always looking for new adventures to write about, she now lives in Tucson, Arizona with her husband and a Welsh springer spaniel named Spot.

Joy’s Blog: www.poetryforchildren.blogspot.com She posts a poem a day and a poetry prompt for children to write poetry of their own.  She’s been doing this for three years now, so there are a lot of poems.

Joy’s Books

Copyright © 2012 Pommelo Books

Copyright © 2012 Pomelo Books

Copyright © 2014 Pomelo Books

Copyright © 2014 Pomelo Books

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science (Teacher’s Edition): Poems for the School Year Integrating Science, Reading, and Language Arts
http://www.amazon.com/Poetry-Anthology-Science-Teachers-Edition/dp/1937057976/

I am in Kindergarten, Second and Third Grade Student Editions.

The back matter in the teacher edition is fantastic with listings of web sites for poetry and science, poetry books for children dealing with science, resources for teachers, web sites for poets in the books, a great index, a glossary of science terms for children and bios for all the contributors.  It is a terrific resource.  Carole Boston Weatherford and Kristi Dempsy from the Carolinas are in the book.  Roby Hood Black from SC and Allan Wolf from Asheville are in there too. There are 78 really great children’s poets in the books, I’m just happy to be included.

Student Editions for Elementary Grade Levels

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science, Kindergarten (includes Joy Acey)
http://www.amazon.com/Poetry-Friday-Anthology-Science-Kindergarten/dp/1937057895/

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science, First Grade Student Edition (does not include Joy Acey)
http://www.amazon.com/The-Poetry-Friday-Anthology-Science/dp/1937057909/

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science, Second Grade Student Edition (includes Joy Acey)
http://www.amazon.com/The-Poetry-Friday-Anthology-Science/dp/1937057917/

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science, Third Grade Student Edition (includes Joy Acey)  http://www.amazon.com/The-Poetry-Friday-Anthology-Science/dp/1937057925/

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science, Fourth Grade Student Edition (does not include Joy Acey)
http://www.amazon.com/The-Poetry-Friday-Anthology-Science/dp/1937057925/

The Poetry Friday Anthology for Science, Fifth Grade Student Edition (does not include Joy Acey) http://www.amazon.com/Poetry-Friday-Anthology-Science-Student/dp/1937057941/

Joy’s Video Performance

Watch Joy performing a poem HOW TALL IS THE BOY?:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CezomJ0lYEc

Guest Interviews Online with Joy

  1. David Harrison’s blog: http://davidlharrison.wordpress.com/?s=Joy+Acey&submit=Search.
  2. Jon MacRush’s blog: http://maclibrary.wordpress.com/2012/09/12/interveiw-wednesday-meet-joy-acey/
  3. Linda Martin Andersen’s A Writer’s Playground blog: http://lindamartinandersen.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/haiku-for-you/

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Thank you, Joy. Your interview was intriguing and fascinating. Like your name, you embody JOY in all its glory. Thank you for being a guest on my blog.

Thank you to everyone who reads this blog post. You make me smile…:). If you’d like to ask a question or tell something to Joy Acey, Princess of Poetry, please leave a comment.

Do something fun today.
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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176 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as she uploads them.

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This interview with Joy Acey is part of the Authors I Admire Series:

  1. 4RV Publishing – Vivian Zabel. “Vivian Zabel and 4RV Publishing
  2. Ann Eisenstein. Catch the Great Dialogue of Amazon Best-Selling Author, Ann Eisenstein
  3. Becky Shillington. Interview with Picture Book and Chapter Book Author, Becky Shillington
  4. Bob Rich, PhD. Interview with Dr. Bob Rich: Writer, Mudsmith, Psychologist, and Editor
  5. Carol Baldwin. Interview and Amazing Facts about Teacher and Author, Carol Baldwin
  6. Carolyn Howard-Johnson. Meet Carolyn Howard-Johnson, Author/Editor, Marketing Guru
  7. Gretchen Griffith. Interview with Gretchn Griffith, Versatile and Talented  Author of Books for Children and Adults
  8. Jeff Herman. My Interview of Jeff Herman
  9. Joy Acey. Joy Acey Says Pub Sub Works (PubSub3rdFri)
  10. Juliana Jones. Top Ten Reasons I Love Being a Part of PubSub3rdFriday! by Juliana Jones
  11. Karen Cioffi-Ventrice. Interview with Karen Cioffi-Ventrice – Writing and Marketing Guru
  12. Linda Martin Andersen. Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author, Linda Martin Andersen
  13. Linda Martin Andersen. Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works
  14. Linda Martin Andersen. What Entices You to Submit Your Writing (PubSub)
  15. Linda Vigen Phillips. Linda Vigen Phillips -Writer of Prose and Poetry for Young Adults and Middle Grades
  16. Joyce Moyer Hostetter. Interview with Joyce Moyer Hostetter – Award Winning Historical Fiction Writer
  17. Margaret Fieland Interview with Intriguing Sci-Fi Author and Editor, Margaret Fieland
  18. Maureen Wartski. In Memoriam: Interview with Maureen Wartski, Artist, Author, and Friend
  19. Megan Vance. Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author Megan Vance
  20. Nicole Thompson-Andrews. Nicole Thompson-Andrews Loves Pub Subbing
  21. Samantha Bell. An Interview with Samantha Bell – Impressive and Talented Author and Illustrator 
  22. Sandra Warren. Fascinating Ideas and Advice from Sandra Warren, Author

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How to Write an Intriguing Memoir


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“How to Write an Intriguing Memoir” by Joan Y. Edwards

A memoir is not an autobiography. It’s a story about related capsules of time in your life related to a theme you choose to relate.

Three Things a Captivating Memoir Must Do:

  1. Captivate
  2. Have a Subject/Theme with Universal Emotional Appeal of Your Readers
  3. Relate to Your Own Personal Experience about Things that May Happen to Anyone

Choose an experience and the best words to show the experience through your eyes, ears, touch, taste, smell, and emotions of the heart. The small details that make you remember an event are the very things that intrigue a reader and helps him relate to your experience. What touches your heart with great emotion either the highly positive or the lowly negative will also touch the hearts of your readers.

The rich and famous are not the only ones who are writing memoirs. Jeff Goins states in his “3 Rules to Write a World-Changing Memoir” that many “normal” people are writing memoirs, too. Since that’s the case he asks, “So what’s to stop you and me from joining them?”

Victoria Costello asks a great questions in 10 Secrets of Successful Memoir Writers: “Don’t the most successful memoirs deal with the most relatable, and therefore universal topics? Think about it…birth, death, loss…loss of one’s mind, child, home, and rebounding from failure.”

Abigail Thomas suggests many two topics/themes in How to Write Your Own Memoir. Here are two of my favorites from her list:

  1. Physical characteristic you are proud to inherit or pass on
  2. When you knew you were in trouble.

A great way to learn how to write a memoir is to read a few of the best-selling memoirs. The work of the masters will show you how to tweak your memoir to touch the hearts of your readers.

What if you don’t know how to start writing your memoir? Are there other methods to get your told? Ryan Van Cleave  in Memoir Writing for Dummies, Chapter One, Memoir Writing for Dummies Cheat Sheet, reminds you that instead of writing down your memoir first, you could record it with a voice recorder, a video camera, or use a ghost writer.

Think back on your life and visualize the parts of your life that filled you with hate, love, joy, fear, surprise, forgiveness, love, and frustration. Brainstorm ideas. Let them simmer in your mind for a while. Jot them down or record them.

If you’re thinking, “I’m not famous enough. I’m not interesting. I lead a boring life.” Think of it in a different way. It is my belief that everyone has an interesting story to tell.  I believe you have a story that the world would like to read. As the Seattle Seahawks, say, “Why not you?”

I wish you success in writing your memoir. Please write and tell me what you think an intriguing memoir must do.

P.S. Rox-San one of my readers, not to be mixed up with Roxanne, another of my readers, requested that I write a post about how to write a memoir. I did this for her and because I didn’t really know what the difference between an autobiography and a memoir was, myself.  Rox-San this one’s for you.

Here are resources to inspire you to write your memoir.

Do something fun today.
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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176 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as she uploads them.

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And the Winner of Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s Frugal Editor, Second Edition Is…


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“And the Winner of Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s Frugal Editor, Second Edition Is…” by Joan Y. Edwards

Thank you, Carolyn Howard-Johnson for doing the interview and offering a giveaway. Thank you to everyone who read and commented on this blog post. I appreciate you very much.

The following people left comments on the blog: Meet Carolyn Howard-Johnson, Author/Editor, Marketing Guru before midnight last night, February 21, 2014. I put their names in a hat for a chance to win a free prize:

  1. Dr. Bob Rich
  2. Mona Pease
  3. Linda Martin Andersen
  4. Claire Iannini
  5. Jacquie Biggar
  6. Rosemary (Arambel)
  7. Dianne Sagan
  8. Karen Cioffi-Ventrice
  9. Chelle Cordero
  10. Sandra Warren

I asked Random.org to choose a number between 1 and 10. Drum Roll. It chose number 7. Therefore, Dianne Sagan, you are the winner of a free eBook version of Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s The Frugal Editor, Second Edition. I know that this book will help you immensely. Please email me at the address from the left-hand column of my blog. I’ll forward your address to Carolyn. She will send you details about how to receive the book.

Celebrate you.
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

And the Winner of a Free Critique of Two Poems from Linda Vigen Phillips Is…


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“And the Winner of a Free Critique of Two Poems from Linda Vigen Phillips Is…” by Joan Y. Edwards

Dear Readers,
There were 9 people who left comments on the post: Linda Vigen Phillips – Writer of Prose and Poetry for Young Adults and Middle Grades before midnight February 16, 2014. Two of them asked not to be counted in the drawing. Therefore there were 7 people in the giveaway contest.

  1. Rosi
  2. Mona Pease
  3. Ann Eisenstein
  4. Sandra Warren
  5. Linda Martin Andersen
  6. Sunnymay
  7. Carolyn Howard-Johnson

8. Gretchen Griffith said not to count her in.
9. Carol Federlin Baldwin said not to count her in.

I asked Random.org to choose a number between 1 and 7. It chose number 4. Congratulations, Sandra. You won a free critique of two poems from Linda Vigen Phillips. Please send me your email address so I can forward it to Linda.

Everyone celebrate.
Never Give Up
Joan

Meet Carolyn Howard-Johnson, Author/Editor, Marketing Guru


Copyright © 2013 Carolyn Howard-Johnson

“Meet Carolyn Howard-Johnson, Author/Editor, Marketing Guru” by Joan Y. Edwards

Carolyn, it is good to see you here today. Thank you for being a guest on my blog. I appreciate you coming to share your great ideas for writing and giving us a glimpse into your life as a writer.

Thank you for inviting me. I love to talk about writing. I’m anxious to get started.

3-2-1 Let’s go.

1. How did you do in English as a kid?

Loved English. Hated math. Part of that was the times. Gender bigotry was rampant and this was part of it.

2. When did you decide to become an author?

I decided I wanted to write very early on. I got active as a journalist on my high school newspaper and even got a vague idea for a novel. But that’s different from “becoming an author.” That happened very late-when most people are considering retirement.

3. What’s your favorite book? Why?

Anna Karenina. It first helped me see what cultural repression does to people.

4. Are your characters based on real people?

Most of them are. But not on a single person. I believe that there is no such thing as making a character up from scratch. We all operate on what we know through our senses.

5. Did you outline and plan your books before you wrote them?

I haven’t done that yet. But I plan to. I think it will save me several drafts.

6. How much research did you have to do for writing and/or publishing your books or manuscript in progress?

Very little because most of my writing is based on true stories. Though fact checking is still essential even in a case like this. I do get surprised occasionally about how memory doesn’t serve.

7. Did you cry while writing one of your books?

Yes, and I’ve been told that my readers do, too. But the endings tend to be happy—just in a different way.

8. Do you have trouble saying goodbye to your characters when you finish the book?
I don’t think I ever do.

9. What’s your favorite book you’ve written?

The one I just finished and is the hands of my agent—This Land Divided.

10.  What’s the funniest thing that ever happened to you related to your writing or book tours?

A man wanted to know if I had a Ph.D. to write novels. He said he had been to many signings and most authors had them. I discovered the problem was he had been to signings of authors who write nonfiction and I’m not sure he saw the difference.

11.  What is your favorite genre?

Poetry. I love symbol, theme, metaphor.

12.  What’s the best way for a writer to improve their writing skills?

The number one thing to improve your writing skills is to READ IN THE GENRE YOU WRITE IN and READ THE BEST WRITERS IN THAT GENRE.

The second thing is to read books about writing in general. I suggest at least one book a month, even if you think you don’t have enough time for writing.

  • Read about specific areas of writing.
  • Read about writing dialogue.
  • Read about structure.
  • Read Joseph Campbell.
  • Read about grammar and editing.

13.   How can a writer find their distinctive voice for their writing?

All of us have a distinctive voice. It’s a matter of finding it. We do that by knowing what we are passionate about and saying it from the heart.

14.   What’s the best way to choose the right narrator for your book – 1st, 2nd, or 3rd?

Oh,  I could write a book on this. It’s one reason a synopsis or outline is a good idea. It helps us see what will be required. Example. I love first person because it brings our characters close to the reader. But a character can only be in one place at any given time so the author must carefully contrive (without looking contrived) who he or she can tell the whole story without its being obvious—the contrivance that is. An outline will help us see if we can do that.

Of course, it doesn’t hurt to write in one voice and switch to another to see how it feels..

15. How can writers improve their revision process?

I just released the 2nd edition of my book, The Frugal Editor. It is available as a Kindle edition and in paperback.  It takes a whole book to answer that question. Yes, it includes: proper formatting, pet words, correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation, varied sentence structure.

16. What does it take to be a great writer?

To be great writers, we must know tons about our entire industry. It makes us better writers but it also prepares us to partner with other experts. No writer is an island, but no writer should put himself or herself at the mercy of another because they don’t understand something about publishing like formatting, marketing –even indexing!

I agree with Joan’s mantra: Never give up. Persistence is the key.

A short bio

Carolyn Howard-Johnson is the author of the multi award-winning series of How To Do It Frugally books for writers including USA Book News winner The Frugal Book Promoter. She has been an instructor for UCLA Extension’s renowned Writers Program for nearly a decade believes in entering (and winning!) contests and anthologies as an excellent way to separate our writing from the hundreds of thousands of books that get published each year. She is a poet and novelist. She loves passing along the tricks of the trade she learned from marketing hard-to-promote genres.

Two of the favorite awards bestowed upon her:

  • “Woman of the Year in Arts and Entertainment” given by members of the California Legislature
  •  “Women Who Make Life Happen” given by the Pasadena Weekly newspaper.

Thank you, Carolyn, for being a guest on my blog. I admire you and appreciate you sharing your expertise with us.

Here are two of Carolyn’s books:

The Frugal Book Promoter Copyright © 2011 Carolyn Howard-Johnson

The Frugal Book Promoter
Copyright © 2011 Carolyn Howard-Johnson

Buy The Frugal Book Promoter on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Frugal-Book-Promoter-partnering-publisher/dp/1463743297/

Copyright © 2013 Carolyn Howard-Johnson

Copyright © 2011 Carolyn Howard-Johnson

Find Carolyn Howard Johnson on the web:

  1. Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s website: http://howtodoitfrugally.com.
  2. Learn about marketing: http://howtodoitfrugally.com.
  3. Subscribe to Carolyn’s newsletter by sending an e-mail with SUBSCRIBE in the window to hojonews@AOL.com.
  4. Discover more about book marketing and editing by subscribing to her award winning blogs: http://TheFrugalEditor.blogspot.com and http://sharingwithwriters.blogspot.com.

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GIVEAWAY

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Carolyn Johnson-Howard is giving away a free copy of THE FRUGAL EDITOR, SECOND EDITION, Kindle Edition (eBook).  To put your name in the hat for the drawing, leave a comment on this blog post before midnight Friday, February 21, 2014. Random.org will choose the winner. I will announce the winner on Saturday, February 22, 2014.

Celebrate you every day.
You are a gift to our world
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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177 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as they are uploaded.

********************************************************************************************************************

This interview with Carolyn Johnson-Howard is part of the Authors I Admire Series:

  1. 4RV Publishing – Vivian Zabel. “Vivian Zabel and 4RV Publishing
  2. Ann Eisenstein. Catch the Great Dialogue of Amazon Best-Selling Author, Ann Eisenstein
  3. Becky Shillington. Interview with Picture Book and Chapter Book Author, Becky Shillington
  4. Bob Rich, PhD. Interview with Dr. Bob Rich: Writer, Mudsmith, Psychologist, and Editor
  5. Carol Baldwin. Interview and Amazing Facts about Teacher and Author, Carol Baldwin
  6. Gretchen Griffith. Interview with Gretchn Griffith, Versatile and Talented  Author of Books for Children and Adults
  7. Jeff Herman. My Interview of Jeff Herman
  8. Joy Acey. Joy Acey Says Pub Sub Works (PubSub3rdFri)
  9. Juliana Jones. Top Ten Reasons I Love Being a Part of PubSub3rdFriday! by Juliana Jones
  10. Karen Cioffi-Ventrice. Interview with Karen Cioffi-Ventrice – Writing and Marketing Guru
  11. Linda Martin Andersen. Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author, Linda Martin Andersen
  12. Linda Martin Andersen. Linda Andersen Is Proof That PubSub3rdFri Works
  13. Linda Martin Andersen. What Entices You to Submit Your Writing (PubSub)
  14. Linda Vigen Phillips. Linda Vigen Phillips -Writer of Prose and Poetry for Young Adults and Middle Grades
  15. Joyce Moyer Hostetter. Interview with Joyce Moyer Hostetter – Award Winning Historical Fiction Writer
  16. Margaret Fieland Interview with Intriguing Sci-Fi Author and Editor, Margaret Fieland
  17. Maureen Wartski. In Memoriam: Interview with Maureen Wartski, Artist, Author, and Friend
  18. Megan Vance. Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author Megan Vance
  19. Nicole Thompson-Andrews. Nicole Thompson-Andrews Loves Pub Subbing
  20. Samantha Bell. An Interview with Samantha Bell – Impressive and Talented Author and Illustrator 
  21. Sandra Warren. Fascinating Ideas and Advice from Sandra Warren, Author

And the Winner of Batman and Robin’s FRIGHT CLUB from Linda Martin Andersen Is…


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“The Winner of Batman and Robin’s FRIGHT CLUB from Linda Martin Andersen Is…”

A big thank you to everyone who read my post, Interview and Great Writing Tips from Author, Linda Martin Andersen.  Those who left fun comments pretending they were Batman or Robin created a fun experience for us. I entered their names in the drawing. Here are the names of those who left a comment before midnight Friday, February 14, 2014:

1. Carol Federlin Baldwin
2. Sandra Warren
3. Brenda Madole
4. Tim Livingston
5. Kathy Burkinshaw
6. Carolyn Howard-Johnson
7. Tracy Campbell
8. Rosi
9. Karen Cioffi-Ventrice
10. Linda Vigen Phillips
11. Sunnymay

I used random.org. I told it that I had 11 people and asked it to choose a number for me. Dun ta Dun. It chose number 5. Therefore, congratulations to Kathy Burkinshaw! She wins a copy of Batman and Robin’s FRIGHT CLUB from Linda Martin Andersen. HOLY COWABUNGA! It’s her lucky day!

Kathy, also known as Kathleen, please send me your snail mail address. I’ll forward it to Linda so your fun can begin.

Never Give Up
Joan

Don’t Use the Red Flag – Take Mail to Post Office – Check Fraud Alert


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

“Don’t Use the Red Flag – Take Mail to Post Office – Check Fraud Alert” by Joan Y. Edwards
Someone stole a check from our mailbox on Monday, January 27, 2014. They used it to get the routing number and bank account number. They used it at the Walmart to cash two checks for $96.40.
Last year, Wal-Mart saved me from credit card fraud. They saved a friend from being scammed from a large amount of money (Read about it here: Beware: Scam of Grandparents). These fraudulent thieves were slick. Even Wal-Mart didn’t catch them.
According to what I’ve read. (You knew I’d research it, didn’t you?) Perhaps the thieves “washed” my amount off and then wrote a new amount.  Then they made a copy of that check. So they have two checks for the same amount. I was lucky. Wal-Mart refunded my money. Thank you, Wal-Mart. A that particular store they did the electronic check cashing; therefore, they didn’t send a physical copy of the check to me at my bank, just the amounts and the check numbers. These guys used two different check numbers, not the real check number on the check. I still had the actual checks with those numbers still in my checkbook. I showed them to my banker.
Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

The thief may have a chemical to erase the amount you put and write in his own amount without being detected…especially if you use a ball point pen (which I did). Check fraud.org says that there are special checks with new security measures. My favorite is one that when someone tries to “wash” the amount with a chemical, the word VOID streaks across the check. Yes. That’s when the Good Guys win.

I don’t usually leave mail in my mailbox to be picked up. However, I really wanted that particular check to be mailed that day so it would get to its destination on time. The irony: It never got there because someone stole it.
I had to get a new checking account, change my automatic drafts, change my bill pays, change my automatic deposits. It was definitely a headache. As my younger daughter and my cousin said, “It was a kick in the __.”

Take action. Protect yourself from check fraud.

  1. Write your checks using the Uniball 207(Gel). It’s hard to erase with chemicals.
  2. Use automatic bank drafts and bill pay services.
  3. Ask your bank about special checks that help prevent the possibility of “washing” (erasing) your check.
  4. Read this article from beginning to end: Check Fraud.org. “Check Washing:” http://www.ckfraud.org/washing.html
  5. Take outgoing mail to a Post Office. If possible, put it inside the post office itself or in one of the mailboxes designated for pickup. Check it first to make sure it’s not so filled up your letter won’t drop below.

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

  6. Don’t put outgoing mail in your mailbox. If you must do that, don’t put the red flag up on your mailbox – it alerts the thieves to get your mail.

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

  7. For incoming mail: Get a lock mailbox that has a slit big enough for your letters to get through, but not a hand. Here’s a large metal black lockable mailbox from Lowe’s: Postmaster 11.75 in x 12 in Metal Black lockable Post Mailbox $39.97. I found many with large price tags.

What we need is a video camera set up inside the mailbox that will take a picture of the person getting the mail out of the mailbox! Here’s what it could look like:

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards and Her Licensors

References:
Check Fraud.org. “Check Fraud:” http://www.ckfraud.org/ckfraud.html
Check Fraud.org. “Check Washing:” http://www.ckfraud.org/washing.html

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Thank you for reading my blog. I appreciate you very much. I pray that you and your mail stays safe.

Celebrate you every day.
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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176 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as they are uploaded.

Dr. Bob Rich Interviewed Me on His Bobbing Around Newsletter/Blog


Thanks for coming. It's so good to see you here.

Thanks for coming. It’s so good to see you here.

“Dr. Bob Rich Interviewed Me on His Bobbing Around Newsletter” by Joan Y. Edwards

I am very excited and honored that I’m the very first person he’s ever interviewed in his newsletter, Bobbing Around Lucky me.

“Interview with Joan Edwards: How to Build Up a Blog” by Dr. Bob Rich: http://bobrich18.wordpress.com/2014/02/14/interview-with-joan-edwards/

Free giveaway details are at the end of the post. Hmm. What am I giving away? Make your guess, then head on over and read the interview.  You must comment on Dr. Bob’s blog post interview to have a chance to win.

Thank you, Dr. Bob. Thank you, readers, for Bobbing on over there to read the interview.

In case you’d like to learn more about Dr. Bob, here’s a link to my interview with him on August 26, 2012.

Interview with Dr. Bob Rich: Writer, Mudsmith, Psychologist, and Editor: http://joanyedwards.wordpress.com/2012/08/26/interview-with-dr-bob-rich-writer-mudsmith-psychologist-and-editor/

Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2013 Joan Y. Edwards

And the Winner of Healing Waters by Joyce Moyer Hostetter Is…


Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“And the Winner of Healing Waters by Joyce Moyer Hostetter Is…” by Joan Y. Edwards

Thank you to Joyce Moyer Hostetter for being a guest on my blog: Interview with Joyce Moyer Hostetter, Award-Winning Historical Fiction Writer. Thank you to all who read it. I really appreciate you and the people who shared wonderful praises in the comment area for Joyce and her books. It is indeed great that Joyce is willing to give a free autographed hardback copy of Healing Waters to one of the lucky people who left a comment. Below are the names of all the people who left a comment between January 29, 2014 and midnight February 7, 2014.

1.    Ann Eisenstein
2.    Linda Martin Andersen
3.    Vijaya
4.    Stephanie Caceres
5.    Sandra Warren
6.    Luann Martin
7.    Rosi
8.    Faith Hough
9.    Linda Vigen Phillips
10.    Bonnie J. Doerr
11.    Elizabeth Vollstadt
12.    Francis Can Mom
13.    Kathy Burkiinshaw

Carol Federlin Baldwin also left a comment, but did not wish to be included in the drawing.

Random.org chose #1. Therefore, Ann Eisenstein you won a free copy of Healing Waters. Congratulations! Please send your snail mail address to me at the contact address from the left-hand column.

Sorry that I was late posting this. It kept you in suspense. Good for writing. Not good for punctuality. It’s one of those times when I look in the mirror and discover that I’m human.

Jump over to Joyce’s blog to discover who won a copy of Healing Waters there:
HEALING WATER: We have a winner!

Celebrate you every day.
Never Give Up
Joan Y. Edwards

Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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173 Subscribers  – Thank you.

Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as they are uploaded.

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Never Give Up
Joan

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