Famous Writers Recovered from Rejection, So Can You. Submit Again #1.


Image Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

Image Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

“Famous Writers Recovered from Rejection, So Can You. Submit Again #1″ by Joan Y. Edwards

First in Rejected – Submit Again Series (Pub Sub)

Thank you, Riley Amos Westbook, (sonshinegreene), one of my latest subscribers, for telling me he would like to know more about how many times famous writers got rejected. I had no idea that little seed of curiosity would lead to a whole series of posts about this topic. There are over one hundred authors I found with information about their rejections before they were published.  I put them in alphabetical order by first names to help you and me find them easier.

 

  1. Agatha Christie tried to get The Mysterious Affair at Styles, featuring the character of Poirot published for 5 years without success. She got it published in 1920. The Guinness Book of World Records lists Christie as the best-selling novelist of all time. She published 85 books according to Wikipedia as noted by Passive Guy in “Ten Best Selling Fiction Authors of All Time
  2. Alex Haley wrote short stories and articles and sent them to magazines and publishers back in the United States. Although he received mostly rejection letters in return, a handful of his stories were published, encouraging Haley to keep writing. His book and movie “Roots” told the story of his ancestors.

  3. Alice Walker. Literary Rejections stated in “Best Sellers Initially Rejected” that Little, Brown & Company passed on a two book deal for Alice Walker. When complete her novel The Color Purple sold 10 million and won the The Pulitzer Prize. Her Official Website stated that she was the first African-American woman to receive the Pulitzer Prize.

  4. Allen Loeb. Kyle Buchanan’s article on The Vulture quoted Allen as saying, “[I was] the baby writer at the lowest rung within the system, who has just enough rope to hang himself. That’s what I lived and breathed for seven, eight years.” Undercover, Escape From New York, Rock of Ages, Just Go With It, and countless other films.

  5. Amanda Hocking. Ed Pinkington relates that in March 2010 Amanda needed $300.00 to go to Chicago for a Muppet exhibit. Here’s how she got her $300.00. She self-published one of her many novels that had been rejected by umpteen book agents and publishing houses from 2001-2010 on Amazon and other digital eBook websites  She thought surely, she could sell a few copies to her family and friends. She was right. By October 2010, she not only raised $300.00 but she sold 150,000 copies of her books. She published My Blood Approves on March 17, 2010 and My Blood Approves, Book 2 called Fate was published April 15, 2010.

  6. Andy Warhol. The Guardian says in its blog,In a way, he was not a writer at all. All his books were either dictated or transcribed from recordings, and in this respect he was part of a curiously old-fashioned tradition. In the LA Times Culture Monster blog, it shows a letter from the Modern Museum of Art(now known as the New York Museum of Art) in which they reject the copy of The Shoe drawing that Andy offered to donate to them for free. The museum official, Alfred H. Barr, Jr. wrote “I regret that I must report to you that the Committee decided, after careful consideration, that they ought not to accept it for our Collection.”

  7. Anne Frank. John Noonan states in his article on Finding Dulcinea.com that after the holocaust was over, Anne’s father, Otto Frank found her diary. He typed it in German and shared it with family and close friends, who convinced him to share it with the world. He took it to a publisher, which released the first copies of the diary, titled “Het Achterhuis,” or “The Secret Annex,” on June 25, 1947.

David Oshinsky states in his New York Times Book Review that The Diary of Anne was rejected by Frank Knopf and 15 others before Doubleday published it in 1952. Now it is one of the best-selling books in history. According to one publisher, The Diary of Anne Frank was scarcely worth reading: “The girl doesn’t, it seems to me, have a special perception or feeling which would lift that book above the ‘curiosity’ level.”

  1. Audrey Niffenegger. In Jessica Strawser’s interview in Writer’s Digest.com, she stated that Audrey Niffenegger spent four and a half years writing The Time Traveler’s Wife and had 20 or more agent rejections before it was published in 2003.
  • Ayn RandOne Hundred Rejections.com says that Rand did not enjoy real success until the publication of The Fountainhead in 1943 which was rejected 12 times. Gradesaver.com states in its Biography of Ayn Rand that many people consider her last novel, Atlas Shrugged (1957) to be her masterpiece

  • 10. Beatrix Potter.  One Hundred Rejections.com says that Beatrix sent her tale to six publishers, but was rejected by all of them because of the lack of colour pictures, which were popular at the time. She self-published Peter Rabbit in 1901 because she was fed up with rejection letters.

     

    I can’t find where Barbara Kingsolver was rejected, but Barbara Kingsolver gives you great advice if you are rejected.

    Barbara Kingsolver. The Poisonwood Bible is one of her best-selling novels. One Hundred Rejections.com says in “Famous Rejection #36: Barbara Kingsolver’s Advice” for writers about rejection is: This manuscript of yours that has just come back from another editor is a precious package. Don’t consider it rejected. Consider that you’ve addressed it ‘to the editor who can appreciate my work’ and it has simply come back stamped ‘Not at this address.’ Just keep looking for the right address.”

    Famous writers recovered from rejection, so can you. Submit again.

    Here’s a three-week plan to get your manuscript, query, cover letter, and/or proposal in gear. Week 4 gets you to celebrate and write another story.PubSub

    Pub Subbers

    Week 1 Send manuscript off for final critique before submission. Choose publisher or agent. Print Guidelines.

    Week 2 Write pitch, query, cover letter, proposal, etc. to make a good impression.

    Week 3 Proof read everything. Submit this week.

    Week 4 Celebrate life. Write another story.

    27 Publishers Who Accept Unsolicited Manuscripts updated August 17, 2014 Now has 27 publishers)

    18 Literary Agents Who Are Looking for You

    Good luck in your publication. Believe in you and your writing.

    Celebrate you.
    Never Give Up
    Joan Y. Edwards

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    References:

     

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    Does Your Main Character Fall into the Bottom of a Deep Pit of Trouble?


    Your Main Character Can Climb Out of Any Deep, Dark Pit - Image Copyright 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    Your Main Character Can Climb Out of Any Deep, Dark Pit – Image Copyright 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    “Does Your Main Character Fall into the Bottom of a Deep Pit of Trouble?” by Joan Y. Edwards

    Go ahead. Drop him in there. Drop your main character into the deepest, darkest, most despicable pit you can dream up for him. In every story you write, your main character must get into so much trouble that it is like a deep, dark pit with no easy way out. He can’t go back to what was. He can’t get to what he wants. He is clueless and helpless until he CHANGES. He has to have an “AHA” moment when he suddenly realizes what he needs to do to face his problem, regardless of the consequences.

    What does the main character do while he’s down there? Let’s name your main character. What about Jeremy Kidd?

    • He’s a 16-year-old junior in high school whose parents are moving to New York City and he refuses to go.
    • He’s an 81-year-old man whose daughter wants him to go to a rest home and he refuses to go.
    • He’s a six-year-old boy whose father tells him he has to play t-ball when he wants to play football.

    Suppose your main character is female. Let’s call her Sadie Tripp.

    • Sadie is a seventeen year old senior whose parents died in a car wreck three months before graduation. She refuses to go to school because she is so depressed.
    • She’s 74 and wants to open her own ice cream parlor and her children try to stop her.
    • She’s 5 years old and her parents won’t let her have a puppy.

    For now your main character’s figuring out ways to get out of this pit. Does he spin a web like Spiderman? Fly with a cape like Superman? Crawl around on the floor with a magnifying glass looking for clues like Sherlock Holmes? No, none of those. They’ve all been done before. Do something different. Put a twist on it.

    What does your main character do that causes him to land at the bottom of the pit? Was it pride that he didn’t listen to the wisdom of others who had been in a similar situation? Was he stubborn and refuse to obey the authority figures? Did he get so angry that he literally drove a car, lost control and landed in a pit? Was it plain stupidity that he didn’t even look where he was going? What does he see? What does he sense? What sounds does he hear? What does his body do? Why does he think this is the end of the world for him?

    The pit is dark and deep with no light showing the way out. Your main character is going to have to climb up and feel his way, inch by inch from the bottom all the way to the top. What will he do when he has no hammer or metal spikes to help him climb out? Your main character seems to get himself into predicaments easily and often, but never as bad as this.

    As the author, you might hesitate about putting your character into a tough predicament. I am here to tell you to relax. Each character you create is clever and resourceful. (Just like you.) He will figure out a fascinating way to get out of this pit in a short amount of time. Why? Because you are the author. You and your main character can do what no one else has ever done before. You are the only ones who can give us your interpretation of this world.

    The world is waiting to hear about how your character survived his “big pit” experience. How does he change? What does he believe now that he didn’t believe before? What new skill did he learn? Who did he learn to trust?

    Don’t worry about your character. He can climb out of any deep dark pit you put him into. Believe in you and your characters. You can do it.

    It would be great to see how you would write a paragraph or a first page of a story using one of the character descriptions above or your own. Please share your paragraph or first page in the comment area. I’d love to read them. I’ll point out a Blue Ribbon Passage (one I especially like) for each passage shared with me in the comment area.

    Celebrate you.
    Never Give Up
    Joan Y. Edwards

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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    7 Reasons to Submit Your Manuscript! Pub Sub


    PubSub

    “7 Reasons to Submit Your Manuscript! Pub Sub” by Joan Y. Edwards

    1. It leads you 100 steps closer to publication and has 100% more successful track record for publication than not submitting.
    2. It gives you a wonderful reason to celebrate by going out to eat supper, call a friend you haven’t talked with in ages, buy a new craft book on writing, or  buy a best-selling book in the genre you write.

    3. It’s one step closer to meeting the world’s need to hear your voice. The world needs to hear and read the voice of every writer. Do your part to have your voice heard, submit your manuscript.

    4. It’s a step closer to receiving a return of money for all your hard work. Never pay a publisher to publish your story. Traditional publishers never charge you money. They pay you a royalty from sales. If you choose to self-publish your work, scout around and find a good deal. It does not cost an arm and a leg to self-publish today when you use print-on-demand. Submit your manuscript to at least 10 publishers/agents before you self-publish.

    5. It leaves you with a great feeling of satisfaction and well-being no other experience can give you. The feeling of knowing you are a professional writer because you submitted your work.

    6. It adds excitement to your world. Now you have the anticipation with wondering what the publisher or agent’s response will be. Be ready for either answer, but keep saying the answer is YES.

    7. It feels good to finally reach a goal and submit your work. It feels good all the way from the top of your head down to the soles of your feet.

    So drop your excuses. Click on the Pub Subber links below for steps to get your manuscript ready for submission. They are also at the top of my blog. Take days, weeks, or months but, get the necessary critiques, final proofs, queries, cover letters, proposals, or other documents ready. Submit your manuscript. The links have detailed steps. I listed a few of the main parts to help you visualize the process.

    Pub Subbers

    Week 1 Send manuscript off for final critique before submission. Choose publisher or agent. Print Guidelines.

    Week 2 Write pitch, query, cover letter, proposal, etc. to make a good impression.

    Week 3 Proof read everything. Submit this week.

    Week 4 Celebrate life. Write another story.

    Good luck in your publication. Believe in you and your writing.

     

    Celebrate you.
    Never Give Up
    Joan Y. Edwards

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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    Thank you to 200 Subscribers as of July 21, 2014!


    Image Copyright © Joan Y. Edwards

    Image Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    Thank you to everyone who has subscribed to my blog. There are now over 200 subscribers! THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU.

    I emailed a link for the free logo and affirmations to the people who subscribed for which WordPress gave me email addresses. Many of them came back saying the email addresses were incorrect. WordPress did not give me the email addresses of those who signed up with a WordPress.com blog. I hope the free logo and free 20 Affirmations get you closer to your goals.

    If you are a subscriber and didn’t receive the link and password for your free gift logo,“Never Give Up, Build It One Block at a Time.” along with 20 Affirmations for writers, email me at joanyedwards1@gmail.com with your name and your email address or blog with which you subscribed.

    If you haven’t subscribed yet, I hope you will. Click the subscribe by email button from the left hand column. You’ll receive an email with the link and password for the free logo and 20 Affirmations for Writers in it.

    Hmm. What should we do when there are 300 subscribers?

    Please feel free to leave suggestions in the comment area.

    Celebrate you!
    Never Give up
    Joan Y. Edwards

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    What Are You Afraid of? Submit That Manuscript! Pub Sub.


    Image Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    Image Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    “What Are You Afraid of? Submit That Manuscript! Pub Sub.” by Joan Y. Edwards

    Franklin D. Roosevelt said, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” Your fears are strong emotions. If you can show the actual facts or accept that it is true. Or delve into the middle of it to find out if all the hype is true or not. Dispel the myths, the rumors, the big build-ups, the legends, the tales.

    Writers Fears:

    #1 Fear of Rejection

    You fear rejection because of two things: what you believe it means that you are not a good writer. That you do not have writing talent.

    Matthew Cook Realize it is not a rejection of you, but take accountability for it. It’s the story ideas or product they are rejecting, not you. Accept that “no” happens and move on.

    Suzannah Windsor Freeman suggests that you research why submissions get rejected and revise your work accordingly.

    I believe the best thing to do after rejection is to take the next action step toward your goal. Submit your manuscript again.

    #2 Fear of Never Getting Published

    Fear of Rejection because it means that you’ll never get Published. Keep the belief: “I am a paid published writer” running through your mind, on your monitor, on your bathroom mirror.

    #3 Fear of Criticism

    You are afraid of criticism because it stops you from working on that story again. It stops you in your tracks. When people criticize your work, you tend to think that the whole thing is bad, because part of it is bad.

    Only change using the suggestions you believe 100%. Delete the other ideas.

    Accept that this is just one person’s opinion. This is not a fact. Each person has a right to their opinion. If you do not understand their criticism, ask them to clarify their point of view. Ask them to tell you why. Ask them how they would change it.

    When you ask a person to critique your work. Ask them to tell you 3 good points about your story.

    #4 Fear of Failure to Sell

    I am afraid my writing won’t sell itself and/or I won’t be able to sell my manuscripts.

    I do not have the sales ability to sell my manuscripts. Andrea Phillips says you suffer from a fear of not making money with your writing.

    Read 100 of the best-selling books in your genre. Then you’ll know what sells.

    Read the pitch summaries from the back of these best-selling book, too.

    Choose three of them to use as a pattern to write your pitch summary for you book.

    Memorize your short selling pitch that fits on a 3×5 inch card. Practice using it to explain what you write to your friends when they ask, “What do you write?”

    Be sure to tell the genre and the number of words in your manuscript in your pitch.

    Interview the top-selling car salesman for your favorite car dealership. Ask him to demonstrate and tell you how he sells a car. Use his tactics to help you sell your manuscript.

     

     #5 Fear of Not Having the Time to Write

    Perhaps you’re a writer whose afraid you won’t have enough time to write. Many people talk themselves into that becoming the truth. Do you know that the more you say something, the more your brain wants you to be right. It goes around searching for experiences to prove you right. So when you say, “I don’t have time to write,” bingo, it becomes true. You have to make time for you to write.

    1. While your children are reading, playing with blocks, a fun activity for them, sit in their midst, and write. Use a pen and paper, electronic tablet or have everyone play in the office where your computer is. Plan your time to write.

    2. If your book needs a lot of research and you’re afraid you won’t have time to do the research that is necessary. Do a Google Search, read the first paragraph or two of a link. If it’s pertinent to your story, copy the link down in a word document or in an email to yourself. Write one sentence that helps in your research from this article. Do 3 each day. Voila. It will add up.

    3. Get up earlier in the morning than you usually do and write for 15 minutes.

    #6 Fear of Being Too Young or Too Old to Write, or Having

    Nothing to Write about That People Will Want to Read

    Hogwash. No one is too young or too old to write. Write about a topic that is extremely interesting and intriguing to you. Chances are it will be fascinating to others, too. Writers usually write about conflicts with universal appeal. If it gets you fired up, it’ll probably get other people’s emotions riled up, too. Don’t set limits on your capabilities. Write what comes from your heart.

    Sarah Jio suggest that you write about what scares you. An awesome idea.

    Keep your eye on the prize – focus your attention (your thoughts, words, and actions) on what you want! Submit That Manuscript – Pub Sub.

    PubSub

    For ideas to help you get your manuscript and necessary queries, cover letters, proposals, etc. read the Pub Subber Pages at the top of my blog:

    Pub Subbers

    Week 1

    Week 2

    Week 3

    Week 4

    Good luck in your publication. Believe in you and your writing.

    Resources I know you will enjoy reading:

    1. Agent X. “Seven Deadly Fears of Writing:” http://menwithpens.ca/7-deadly-fears-of-writing/
    2. Janna Malamud Smith. “Three Quiet Fears That Stop Writers from Writing:” http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/3-quiet-fears-that-stop-writers-from-writing
    3. Matthew Cook. “3 Keys for Dealing with Rejection in Sales:” http://web2.salesforcesearch.com/bid/149770/3-Keys-for-Dealing-with-Rejection-in-Sales
    4. Sage Cohen. “10 Ways to Harness Fear and Fuel Your Writing:” http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/10-ways-to-harness-fear-and-fuel-your-writing
    5. Sarah Jio. “Writing and Fear:” http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/10/writing-and-fear/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
    6. Suzannah Windsor Freeman. “15 Common Writing Fears You Need to Face:” http://writeitsideways.com/15-common-writing-fears-you-need-to-face/

    Please leave a comment. Tell me one of your biggest writing fears and how you overcome it!

    Celebrate you.
    Never Give Up
    Joan Y. Edwards

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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    199 Subscribers  – Thank you. (Oh my goodness! Only one more to an extra gift of 20 affirmations for writers when you subscribe.)

    Subscribe to Joan’s Never Give Up blog by email from the left-hand column and receive a free Never Give Up logo image. You’ll receive her new blog posts filled with inspiration and information in your inbox as soon as she uploads them.

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    And the Four Winners of Free Manuscript Critiques Are…


    Copyright © 2013 Joan Y. Edwards

    Copyright © 2013-2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    “And the Four Winners of Free Manuscript Critiques Are…”
    There were 14 people who left a comment on the 140,000 views post before Midnight on June 17, 2014. I treasure your interaction with me. Thank you for reading my blog and for leaving a comment:
    1.    June Phyllis Baker
    2.    Becky Shillington
    3.    Linda Martin Andersen
    4.    Cindy B
    5.    Beverly Stowe McClure
    6.    Sharon Willett
    7.    Mona Pease
    8.    Dr. Bob Rich
    9.    Sandra Warren
    10.    Janis Silverman
    11.    Kathleen Burkinshaw
    12.    Carol Federlin Baldwin
    13.    Widdershins
    14.    Sandra Haase

    Congratulations to the four winners chosen by Random.org:

    1. A free critique of 1,000 words of a manuscript-Linda Martin Andersen
    2. A free critique of 2,000 words of a manuscript-Janis Silverman
    3. A free critique of 3,000 words of a manuscript-Cindy B.
    4. A free critique of 4,000 words of a manuscript-Becky Shillington

    Please send your manuscripts to me at joanyedwards1@gmail.com.

    Celebrate you! Have a fun day!

    Never Give Up
    Joan Y. Edwards

    Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

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    How to Write a Pitch, Summary, and Synopsis That Sells


    How to Write a Pitch, Summary, and Synopsis That Sells Image Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    How to Write a Pitch, Summary, and Synopsis That Sells
    Image Copyright © 2014 Joan Y. Edwards

    “How to Write a Pitch, Summary, and Synopsis That Sells” by Joan Y. Edwards

    In a pitch, query, pitch summary/chapter summary, or a synopsis:

    1. Mention the genre and the number of words.
    2. Use Times New Roman, Size 12 Font.
    3. Use One Inch Margins.
    4. Single or double-spaced according to the guidelines of the publisher or agent. If there are no directions online, go with your best gut feeling or the advice of someone you trust.

     A Pitch is the shortest summary of story that captures the core emotional conflict of a story.

    Best selling short pitches use only one or two sentences. They call a pitch for a movie a logline. Your pitch’s job is to tug at the reader’s heartstrings and cause him to feel empathy, sympathy, compassion, respect, favor, understanding, and/or support for the main character’s predicament along with an unstoppable curiosity to find out if and how he solves his problem. If your pitch doesn’t do that, simply it does not sell. The reader closes his mind to your story and that’s it.

    A Pitch tells Who, What, When, Where, and How and Why should I care? 

    In the Short Selling Pitch -Elevator Pitch – (one or two sentences – 25 words or less is BEST. Keep under 60-100. Get readers to relate to your main character.Short Selling Pitch Describe an ironic emotional situation that your main character is in that cannot be solved unless this character changes. The pitch must have the biggest conflict mentioned so that the emotional pull is there for the audience. Describe his present condition in the inciting incident at which he has no hope of winning or getting what he wants (reaching his goal). In many stories, characters don’t get what they want, however, they get what they need.

    Longer Selling Pitch is also only about the Main Character and one or two others in the main problem or conflict. This longer selling pitch is used as the blurb on the back of your book in a paragraph or two. It can be used as the plot summary for Amazon or Barnes & Noble to help sell the book. This longer pitch can be 60-200 words (100-300 for a romance). Lean to the fewest words you can use and still tell the story and pull in with emotion.

    Use phrases from short and long pitches in conversations with editors, agents, and prospective readers. Use them also in query letters, cover letters, proposals, and beginning of a synopsis. It is a great marketing tool to persuade people to buy your book.

    The Literary Consultancy in the United Kingdom shared a short pitch and a longer pitch for Pride and Prejudice:

     Short Pitch

    Pride and Prejudice is a contemporary, literary romance about a woman who falls in love with a man she thinks she hates. (22 words)

    Longer Pitch (Major Problem Summary)

    Pride and Prejudice, a contemporary, literary novel, tells the story of Elizabeth Bennett, a proud, intelligent woman, one of five sisters, whose mother is committed to marrying her children off as a matter of urgency. Elizabeth meets Darcy, owner of a grand estate, but considers him over proud, arrogant and undesirable. In time, she learns that he is not all that he appears to be, and revises her prejudice, before they fall deeply in love. (75 words)

    Non-Fiction Chapter-by-Chapter Summary for Your Book Proposal

    In addition to a table of contents, your book proposal needs what Michael Larsen calls “chapter-by-chapter summary.” The chapter-by-chapter summary outlines what each chapter covers in one paragraph each.

    Your Agent or Editor wants a Synopsis.

    What is a synopsis? A synopsis is an outline of the plot of a book that is 2-5 pages with from 500-1250 words. If your synopsis is 25-30 pages long, the agent or editor might lose interest after the first 5, so be succinct. You don’t want your reader to fall asleep.

    When you write a Synopsis, first start with your pitch summary from the blurb on the back of your book cover. After the pitch summary, then write the full synopsis using a paragraph for each plot point and tell the ending.

    Scriptlab.com gives 5 major points in a video: http://thescriptlab.com/screenwriting-101/screenplay/five-plot-point-breakdowns

    1. Inciting Incident
    2. Lock In
    3. Midpoint
    4. Main Culmination
    5. Third Act Twist

    My Plot Points:

    • Ordinary Day
    • Inciting incident with new goal to solve a really big problem
    • First failure
    • Second failure
    • Third failure – Aha moment when he figures it out and gets brave enough to confront
    • Fight
    • Win/Lose
    • Resolution What’s it like on the new ordinary day

    Bonnie Adamson, illustrator and Assistant Regional Advisor of SCBWI-Carolinas shared Darcy Pattison’s article about Synopsis: Darcy Pattison. “Synopsis: A Google Search Example:”http://www.darcypattison.com/marketing/synopsis-a-google-example/. Darcy proposes a fun and effective writing exercise for crafting synopses, blurbs, elevator pitches, based on the conventions of Google search shown through 12 phrases.

    Synopsis: A Google Example: Need better marketing copy for your story? Using only 12 phrases, this video tells a story and evokes emotion.

    Holly Robinson gives pointers for your synopsis:

    1. Keep your language clear and active, and focus on telling the story. As your plot unfolds, write it the way you would tell about a movie to a friend, skip the dull parts and hit the main highlights.
    2. Start the book at the first scene in the book with the main character: “From the moment she woke on that chilly February morning, Savannah Smith knew without a doubt that she would divorce her husband.”
    3. Show the beginning, middle, and end with main character conflicts and resolutions. Don’t get bogged down in details. Stick to a few main characters – perhaps the protagonist and antagonist and make their core conflicts and their emotional ups and downs, with their twists and turns.
    4. When you introduce a new character, give a quick character sketch: “Burly Jones is a 36-year-old workaholic whose biggest joys in life are horseshoes, women, and his motorcycle, not necessarily in that order.”
    5. Include perhaps one piece of dialogue between the protagonist and the antagonist to give evidence of the tone of the story.

    On Internet Movie Data Base website (IMBd.com), you can check the Plot Summaries against the Synopsis. The synopsis is usually much longer. Compare the Plot Summary of Gone with the Wind with its Synopsis. The Plot Summary is approximately one page. The Synopsis goes on and on and on.Synopsis.

    References:

    1. AP Watt Agent Juliet Pickering. “How to Approach a Literary Agent written by a real life AP Watt Agent:” http://bubblecow.net/how-to-approach-a-literary-agent-written-by-a-real-life-ap-watt-agent/
    2. Book Ends Literary Agency. “Synopsis:” http://bookendslitagency.blogspot.com/2009/02/synopsis.html
    3. Bonnie Adamson. http://bonnieadamson.com/
    4. Cliff Daigle. “How to Pitch Your Novel:” http://fictionwriting.about.com/od/thebusinessofwriting/a/How-To-Pitch-Your-Novel.htm.
    5. Darcy Pattison. “Synopsis: A Google Search Example:”http://www.darcypattison.com/marketing/synopsis-a-google-example/
    6. Glen C. Strathy. “How to Write a Synopsis:” http://www.how-to-write-a-book-now.com/how-to-write-a-synopsis.html
    7. Holly Robinson, “Synopsis Tips:” http://www.huffingtonpost.com/holly-robinson/book-synopsis-tips_b_2426724.html
    8. Internet Movie DataBase. http://www.imdb.com
    9. Lee Allen. “How to Write a Book.now.com Plot Outline vs Synopsis:” http://www.how-to-write-a-book-now.com/plot-outline-vs-synopsis.html#sthash.eXbj8Uxa.dpuf
    10. Literary Consultancy: “Synopsis:” http://literaryconsultancy.co.uk/?s=synopsis
    11. Miss Snark. the literary agent. “Synopsis Spacing:” http://misssnark.blogspot.com/2006/01/synopsis-spacing.html
    12. Nathan Bransford. “How to Format a Query Letter:” http://blog.nathanbransford.com/2010/03/how-to-format query-letter.html
    13. Nathan Bransford. “How to Write a Synopsis:” http://blog.nathanbransford.com/2007/08/how-to-write-synopsis.html
    14. Scriptlab. “Five Plot Point Breakdowns:” http://thescriptlab.com/screenwriting-101/screenplay/five-plot-point-breakdowns
    15. William Cane. “Book Proposal:” http://www.hiwrite.com/bookproposal.html

    Thank you for reading my blog. I’d love to hear your tips to make your pitch, summary, and synopsis sell! It’s not too late to enter to win a free critique on the following blog post:
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    Joan Y. Edwards

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